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High-precision, large-domain three-dimensional manipulation of nano-materials for fabrication nanodevices.

Zou R, Yu L, Zhang Z, Chen Z, Hu J - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: With some advantages of high precision and large domain, we can move and position and interconnect individual nanowires for contracting nanodevices.Interestingly, by the manipulating technique, the nanodevice made of three vertically interconnecting nanowires, i.e., diode, was realized and showed an excellent electrical property.This technique may be useful to fabricate electronic devices based on the nanowires' moving, positioning, and interconnecting and may overcome fundamental limitations of conventional mechanical fabrication.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620, China. hu.junqing@dhu.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
Nanoscaled materials are attractive building blocks for hierarchical assembly of functional nanodevices, which exhibit diverse performances and simultaneous functions. We innovatively fabricated semiconductor nano-probes of tapered ZnS nanowires through melting and solidifying by electro-thermal process; and then, as-prepared nano-probes can manipulate nanomaterials including semiconductor/metal nanowires and nanoparticles through sufficiently electrostatic force to the desired location without structurally and functionally damage. With some advantages of high precision and large domain, we can move and position and interconnect individual nanowires for contracting nanodevices. Interestingly, by the manipulating technique, the nanodevice made of three vertically interconnecting nanowires, i.e., diode, was realized and showed an excellent electrical property. This technique may be useful to fabricate electronic devices based on the nanowires' moving, positioning, and interconnecting and may overcome fundamental limitations of conventional mechanical fabrication.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic of the setup shows moving nanomaterials by electrostatic force. A DC bias voltage is applied between the nanowire probe and the target nanomaterials, and an electrostatic force between the nanowire probe and the target nanomaterials is initiated.
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Figure 3: Schematic of the setup shows moving nanomaterials by electrostatic force. A DC bias voltage is applied between the nanowire probe and the target nanomaterials, and an electrostatic force between the nanowire probe and the target nanomaterials is initiated.

Mentions: Employing the ZnS nanowire nano-probe, 3D scale high-precision manipulating semiconductor nanowires for the fabrication of prototypical nanodevices is achieved, and a possible mechanism for this manipulating process is proposed in Figure 3. When a sufficient DC bias voltage is loaded between the ZnS nanowire probe and an adjacent target nanowire (to be moved) on opposite cantilever, electrostatic force is initiated. If the nanowire probe has some positive electric charges, the target nanowire on opposite cantilever will have negative charges. Oppositely, if the nanowire probe has negative electric charges, the target nanowire on opposite cantilever has positive electric charges. Also, the ZnS nanowire probe can be located at different positions on the target nanowire, and then electrostatic force can be initiated at different positions on the target nanowire. The strong adhesion of the target nanowire to the ZnS nanowire probe will be effectively formed when the ZnS nanowire probe contacts it by electrostatic force. So, we can accomplish a simple, high-precision, and large-domain movement of some nanowires for fabricating nanodevices. These TEM images show the ZnS nanowire probe attached to the Pt cantilever and an Au electrode (or cantilever) oriented opposite. An obvious feature showing achieving reliable electrostatic force can be demonstrated from the consecutive variation of an angle between the ZnS nanowire probe and a marked nanowire (marked by two lines). As the bias voltage increases from 0 V, electrostatic force occurs and the ZnS nanowire probe bends toward the opposite Au electrode. Continuously increasing bias voltage results in a continuous increase of the ZnS nanowire probe bending degree. A series of TEM images of the ZnS nanowire probe continuously bending when the bias voltage is continuously increased from V = 0 V to V = 55 V are shown in Figure 4a. As the DC bias voltage increases, the electrostatic force increases, and the ZnS nanowire probe bending is clearly observable. The angle between the nanoprobe and marked nanowire (indicated by two lines) when voltage applied is 0, 5, 35, and 55 V, is 0°, 1.1°, 7°, and 11.2°, respectively. A curve of the ZnS nanowire probe bending angle and applied voltage over the whole process is shown in Figure 4b, which has also been acquired using counter bias voltage. It illustrates that the angle of the nanowire probe bending is associated with the applied DC bias voltage. In addition, the electrostatic force of other materials, such as, Si nanowires, was confirmed in our study (see Figure S1 in Additional file 1). The present finding suggests that an electrostatic force motivated by the applied bias voltage is a common phenomenon for moving nanomaterials.


High-precision, large-domain three-dimensional manipulation of nano-materials for fabrication nanodevices.

Zou R, Yu L, Zhang Z, Chen Z, Hu J - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Schematic of the setup shows moving nanomaterials by electrostatic force. A DC bias voltage is applied between the nanowire probe and the target nanomaterials, and an electrostatic force between the nanowire probe and the target nanomaterials is initiated.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211986&req=5

Figure 3: Schematic of the setup shows moving nanomaterials by electrostatic force. A DC bias voltage is applied between the nanowire probe and the target nanomaterials, and an electrostatic force between the nanowire probe and the target nanomaterials is initiated.
Mentions: Employing the ZnS nanowire nano-probe, 3D scale high-precision manipulating semiconductor nanowires for the fabrication of prototypical nanodevices is achieved, and a possible mechanism for this manipulating process is proposed in Figure 3. When a sufficient DC bias voltage is loaded between the ZnS nanowire probe and an adjacent target nanowire (to be moved) on opposite cantilever, electrostatic force is initiated. If the nanowire probe has some positive electric charges, the target nanowire on opposite cantilever will have negative charges. Oppositely, if the nanowire probe has negative electric charges, the target nanowire on opposite cantilever has positive electric charges. Also, the ZnS nanowire probe can be located at different positions on the target nanowire, and then electrostatic force can be initiated at different positions on the target nanowire. The strong adhesion of the target nanowire to the ZnS nanowire probe will be effectively formed when the ZnS nanowire probe contacts it by electrostatic force. So, we can accomplish a simple, high-precision, and large-domain movement of some nanowires for fabricating nanodevices. These TEM images show the ZnS nanowire probe attached to the Pt cantilever and an Au electrode (or cantilever) oriented opposite. An obvious feature showing achieving reliable electrostatic force can be demonstrated from the consecutive variation of an angle between the ZnS nanowire probe and a marked nanowire (marked by two lines). As the bias voltage increases from 0 V, electrostatic force occurs and the ZnS nanowire probe bends toward the opposite Au electrode. Continuously increasing bias voltage results in a continuous increase of the ZnS nanowire probe bending degree. A series of TEM images of the ZnS nanowire probe continuously bending when the bias voltage is continuously increased from V = 0 V to V = 55 V are shown in Figure 4a. As the DC bias voltage increases, the electrostatic force increases, and the ZnS nanowire probe bending is clearly observable. The angle between the nanoprobe and marked nanowire (indicated by two lines) when voltage applied is 0, 5, 35, and 55 V, is 0°, 1.1°, 7°, and 11.2°, respectively. A curve of the ZnS nanowire probe bending angle and applied voltage over the whole process is shown in Figure 4b, which has also been acquired using counter bias voltage. It illustrates that the angle of the nanowire probe bending is associated with the applied DC bias voltage. In addition, the electrostatic force of other materials, such as, Si nanowires, was confirmed in our study (see Figure S1 in Additional file 1). The present finding suggests that an electrostatic force motivated by the applied bias voltage is a common phenomenon for moving nanomaterials.

Bottom Line: With some advantages of high precision and large domain, we can move and position and interconnect individual nanowires for contracting nanodevices.Interestingly, by the manipulating technique, the nanodevice made of three vertically interconnecting nanowires, i.e., diode, was realized and showed an excellent electrical property.This technique may be useful to fabricate electronic devices based on the nanowires' moving, positioning, and interconnecting and may overcome fundamental limitations of conventional mechanical fabrication.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620, China. hu.junqing@dhu.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
Nanoscaled materials are attractive building blocks for hierarchical assembly of functional nanodevices, which exhibit diverse performances and simultaneous functions. We innovatively fabricated semiconductor nano-probes of tapered ZnS nanowires through melting and solidifying by electro-thermal process; and then, as-prepared nano-probes can manipulate nanomaterials including semiconductor/metal nanowires and nanoparticles through sufficiently electrostatic force to the desired location without structurally and functionally damage. With some advantages of high precision and large domain, we can move and position and interconnect individual nanowires for contracting nanodevices. Interestingly, by the manipulating technique, the nanodevice made of three vertically interconnecting nanowires, i.e., diode, was realized and showed an excellent electrical property. This technique may be useful to fabricate electronic devices based on the nanowires' moving, positioning, and interconnecting and may overcome fundamental limitations of conventional mechanical fabrication.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus