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Ultrafast nano-oscillators based on interlayer-bridged carbon nanoscrolls.

Zhang Z, Li T - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: We demonstrate an effective strategy to reduce the dissipation of the CNS-based nano-oscillator by covalently bridging the carbon layers in the CNS.We further demonstrate that such a CNS-based nano-oscillator can be excited and driven by an external AC electric field, and oscillate at more than 100 GHz.The CNS-based nano-oscillators not only offer a feasible pathway toward ultrafast nano-devices but also hold promise to enable nanoscale energy transduction, harnessing, and storage (e.g., from electric to mechanical).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA. LiT@umd.edu.

ABSTRACT
We demonstrate a viable approach to fabricating ultrafast axial nano-oscillators based on carbon nanoscrolls (CNSs) using molecular dynamics simulations. Initiated by a single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT), a monolayer graphene can continuously scroll into a CNS with the CNT housed inside. The CNT inside the CNS can oscillate along axial direction at a natural frequency of tens of gigahertz. We demonstrate an effective strategy to reduce the dissipation of the CNS-based nano-oscillator by covalently bridging the carbon layers in the CNS. We further demonstrate that such a CNS-based nano-oscillator can be excited and driven by an external AC electric field, and oscillate at more than 100 GHz. The CNS-based nano-oscillators not only offer a feasible pathway toward ultrafast nano-devices but also hold promise to enable nanoscale energy transduction, harnessing, and storage (e.g., from electric to mechanical).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Oscillation of a CNT housed inside an interlayer-bridged CNS. (a) Snapshots of the axial oscillation of the bridged-CNS-based nano-oscillator at 25, 35, 45, 55, 65, and 75 ps, respectively. Note the oscillation of the CNS itself is fully constrained by the interlayer bridging bonds. (b) The evolution of CNT oscillation amplitude. (c) The peak amplitude of each oscillation cycle and the corresponding oscillation frequency as a function of time, respectively. The simulations are carried out at 100 K.
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Figure 5: Oscillation of a CNT housed inside an interlayer-bridged CNS. (a) Snapshots of the axial oscillation of the bridged-CNS-based nano-oscillator at 25, 35, 45, 55, 65, and 75 ps, respectively. Note the oscillation of the CNS itself is fully constrained by the interlayer bridging bonds. (b) The evolution of CNT oscillation amplitude. (c) The peak amplitude of each oscillation cycle and the corresponding oscillation frequency as a function of time, respectively. The simulations are carried out at 100 K.

Mentions: The oscillation of the SWCNT housed inside the interlayer-bridged CNS is then investigated following the similar procedure used for that of the SWCNT inside the un-bridged CNS. Figure 5a shows the snapshots of the axial oscillation of the interlayer-bridged CNS/CNT nanostructure at 25, 35, 45, 55, 65, and 75 ps, respectively (see Additional file 4 for a video of the oscillation). No appreciable relative sliding among the CNS layers is found during the oscillation of the CNT. In other words, the self-oscillation of the CNS is effectively suppressed by the interlayer bridging bonds. This is further confirmed by the negligible difference between the absolute amplitude and relative amplitude of the CNT as defined above. Figures 5b plots the absolute amplitude of CNT as a function of simulation time. Compared with the oscillation of the CNT inside an un-bridged CNS, the CNT oscillation inside an interlayer-bridged CNS is much more regular. Also evident in Figure 5b is the slower decay of the oscillation amplitude when compared with Figure 3b, which results from the suppression of energy dissipation due to interlayer relative sliding in the CNS. Figure 5c plots the peak amplitude of each oscillation cycle and the corresponding oscillation frequency obtained from FFT analysis as a function of simulation time, respectively. The initial frequency of the CNT oscillation is 29.4 GHz when the oscillation amplitude is about 1.15 nm, and the oscillation frequency at 2 ns is 47.0 GHz when the oscillation amplitude is about 0.30 nm. The oscillation frequency increases monotonically as the oscillation amplitude decreases over the time. Such a dependence of oscillation frequency on oscillation amplitude is consistent with the MWCNT-based axial oscillators as reported in earlier studies [30,31].


Ultrafast nano-oscillators based on interlayer-bridged carbon nanoscrolls.

Zhang Z, Li T - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Oscillation of a CNT housed inside an interlayer-bridged CNS. (a) Snapshots of the axial oscillation of the bridged-CNS-based nano-oscillator at 25, 35, 45, 55, 65, and 75 ps, respectively. Note the oscillation of the CNS itself is fully constrained by the interlayer bridging bonds. (b) The evolution of CNT oscillation amplitude. (c) The peak amplitude of each oscillation cycle and the corresponding oscillation frequency as a function of time, respectively. The simulations are carried out at 100 K.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211983&req=5

Figure 5: Oscillation of a CNT housed inside an interlayer-bridged CNS. (a) Snapshots of the axial oscillation of the bridged-CNS-based nano-oscillator at 25, 35, 45, 55, 65, and 75 ps, respectively. Note the oscillation of the CNS itself is fully constrained by the interlayer bridging bonds. (b) The evolution of CNT oscillation amplitude. (c) The peak amplitude of each oscillation cycle and the corresponding oscillation frequency as a function of time, respectively. The simulations are carried out at 100 K.
Mentions: The oscillation of the SWCNT housed inside the interlayer-bridged CNS is then investigated following the similar procedure used for that of the SWCNT inside the un-bridged CNS. Figure 5a shows the snapshots of the axial oscillation of the interlayer-bridged CNS/CNT nanostructure at 25, 35, 45, 55, 65, and 75 ps, respectively (see Additional file 4 for a video of the oscillation). No appreciable relative sliding among the CNS layers is found during the oscillation of the CNT. In other words, the self-oscillation of the CNS is effectively suppressed by the interlayer bridging bonds. This is further confirmed by the negligible difference between the absolute amplitude and relative amplitude of the CNT as defined above. Figures 5b plots the absolute amplitude of CNT as a function of simulation time. Compared with the oscillation of the CNT inside an un-bridged CNS, the CNT oscillation inside an interlayer-bridged CNS is much more regular. Also evident in Figure 5b is the slower decay of the oscillation amplitude when compared with Figure 3b, which results from the suppression of energy dissipation due to interlayer relative sliding in the CNS. Figure 5c plots the peak amplitude of each oscillation cycle and the corresponding oscillation frequency obtained from FFT analysis as a function of simulation time, respectively. The initial frequency of the CNT oscillation is 29.4 GHz when the oscillation amplitude is about 1.15 nm, and the oscillation frequency at 2 ns is 47.0 GHz when the oscillation amplitude is about 0.30 nm. The oscillation frequency increases monotonically as the oscillation amplitude decreases over the time. Such a dependence of oscillation frequency on oscillation amplitude is consistent with the MWCNT-based axial oscillators as reported in earlier studies [30,31].

Bottom Line: We demonstrate an effective strategy to reduce the dissipation of the CNS-based nano-oscillator by covalently bridging the carbon layers in the CNS.We further demonstrate that such a CNS-based nano-oscillator can be excited and driven by an external AC electric field, and oscillate at more than 100 GHz.The CNS-based nano-oscillators not only offer a feasible pathway toward ultrafast nano-devices but also hold promise to enable nanoscale energy transduction, harnessing, and storage (e.g., from electric to mechanical).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA. LiT@umd.edu.

ABSTRACT
We demonstrate a viable approach to fabricating ultrafast axial nano-oscillators based on carbon nanoscrolls (CNSs) using molecular dynamics simulations. Initiated by a single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT), a monolayer graphene can continuously scroll into a CNS with the CNT housed inside. The CNT inside the CNS can oscillate along axial direction at a natural frequency of tens of gigahertz. We demonstrate an effective strategy to reduce the dissipation of the CNS-based nano-oscillator by covalently bridging the carbon layers in the CNS. We further demonstrate that such a CNS-based nano-oscillator can be excited and driven by an external AC electric field, and oscillate at more than 100 GHz. The CNS-based nano-oscillators not only offer a feasible pathway toward ultrafast nano-devices but also hold promise to enable nanoscale energy transduction, harnessing, and storage (e.g., from electric to mechanical).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus