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Polystyrene negative resist for high-resolution electron beam lithography.

Ma S, Con C, Yavuz M, Cui B - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: It demonstrated fairly well-defined patterning of a 20-nm period line array and a 15-nm period dot array, which are the densest patterns ever achieved using organic EBL resists.It is also considerably more resistant to dry etching than PMMA.With a low sensitivity, it would find applications where negative resist is desired and throughput is not a major concern.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology (WIN), University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave, West, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada. bcui@uwaterloo.ca.

ABSTRACT
We studied the exposure behavior of low molecular weight polystyrene as a negative tone electron beam lithography (EBL) resist, with the goal of finding the ultimate achievable resolution. It demonstrated fairly well-defined patterning of a 20-nm period line array and a 15-nm period dot array, which are the densest patterns ever achieved using organic EBL resists. Such dense patterns can be achieved both at 20 and 5 keV beam energies using different developers. In addition to its ultra-high resolution capability, polystyrene is a simple and low-cost resist with easy process control and practically unlimited shelf life. It is also considerably more resistant to dry etching than PMMA. With a low sensitivity, it would find applications where negative resist is desired and throughput is not a major concern.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Dense 2D dot array with a period of 15-nm exposure at 5 keV and developed by chlorobenzene and xylene for 1.5 min at room temperature.
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Figure 4: Dense 2D dot array with a period of 15-nm exposure at 5 keV and developed by chlorobenzene and xylene for 1.5 min at room temperature.

Mentions: For dot array patterns, the densest array for which the dot is still fairly well defined is with a 15-nm period (Figure 4), which is believed to be the highest pattern density ever obtained using organic EBL resists. Here, the array was exposed at 5 keV and developed by xylene and chlorobenzene for 90 s at room temperature. The effort toward dense 2D array pattern has been driven by the fabrication of bit-patterned media [22], and the previously evaluated array periods of 18 nm (corresponding to 2.0 Tbits/in2) using organic ZEP resist, and 12 nm using inorganic HSQ resist have been achieved [23].


Polystyrene negative resist for high-resolution electron beam lithography.

Ma S, Con C, Yavuz M, Cui B - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Dense 2D dot array with a period of 15-nm exposure at 5 keV and developed by chlorobenzene and xylene for 1.5 min at room temperature.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211865&req=5

Figure 4: Dense 2D dot array with a period of 15-nm exposure at 5 keV and developed by chlorobenzene and xylene for 1.5 min at room temperature.
Mentions: For dot array patterns, the densest array for which the dot is still fairly well defined is with a 15-nm period (Figure 4), which is believed to be the highest pattern density ever obtained using organic EBL resists. Here, the array was exposed at 5 keV and developed by xylene and chlorobenzene for 90 s at room temperature. The effort toward dense 2D array pattern has been driven by the fabrication of bit-patterned media [22], and the previously evaluated array periods of 18 nm (corresponding to 2.0 Tbits/in2) using organic ZEP resist, and 12 nm using inorganic HSQ resist have been achieved [23].

Bottom Line: It demonstrated fairly well-defined patterning of a 20-nm period line array and a 15-nm period dot array, which are the densest patterns ever achieved using organic EBL resists.It is also considerably more resistant to dry etching than PMMA.With a low sensitivity, it would find applications where negative resist is desired and throughput is not a major concern.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology (WIN), University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave, West, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada. bcui@uwaterloo.ca.

ABSTRACT
We studied the exposure behavior of low molecular weight polystyrene as a negative tone electron beam lithography (EBL) resist, with the goal of finding the ultimate achievable resolution. It demonstrated fairly well-defined patterning of a 20-nm period line array and a 15-nm period dot array, which are the densest patterns ever achieved using organic EBL resists. Such dense patterns can be achieved both at 20 and 5 keV beam energies using different developers. In addition to its ultra-high resolution capability, polystyrene is a simple and low-cost resist with easy process control and practically unlimited shelf life. It is also considerably more resistant to dry etching than PMMA. With a low sensitivity, it would find applications where negative resist is desired and throughput is not a major concern.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus