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Enhancement of critical heat flux in nucleate boiling of nanofluids: a state-of-art review.

Kim H - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: The purpose of this article is to provide an exhaustive review of these studies.Also, attempts to explain the physical mechanism based on available CHF theories are described.Finally, future research needs are identified.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyunggi 446-701, Republic of Korea. hdkims@khu.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT
Nanofluids (suspensions of nanometer-sized particles in base fluids) have recently been shown to have nucleate boiling critical heat flux (CHF) far superior to that of the pure base fluid. Over the past decade, numerous experimental and analytical studies on the nucleate boiling CHF of nanofluids have been conducted. The purpose of this article is to provide an exhaustive review of these studies. The characteristics of CHF enhancement in nanofluids are systemically presented according to the effects of the primary boiling parameters. Research efforts to identify the effects of nanoparticles underlying irregular enhancement phenomena of CHF in nanofluids are then presented. Also, attempts to explain the physical mechanism based on available CHF theories are described. Finally, future research needs are identified.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Images of nanparticle coating generated, on the heater surface [28].
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Figure 10: Images of nanparticle coating generated, on the heater surface [28].

Mentions: Before proceeding to the assessment of surface effects on CHF enhancement in nanofluids, a prior question arises: why are nanoparticles deposited on the heater surface during nucleate boiling of nanofluids? Kim et al. [52] reported that the nanoparticle layer developed only during nucleate boiling in nanofluids, but was not caused by gravitational sedimentation or single-phase natural convection. Kim et al. [46] suggested the hypothesis that the evaporation of microlayers initially containing nanoparticles could be the reason for the formation of the porous layer. As vapor bubbles grow, the evaporating liquid leaves behind nanoparticles, which then concentrate at the base of the bubbles, forming the microlayer. As the microlayer evaporates, nanoparticles are again left behind, and they then bond to the hot heater surface. Kwark et al. [28] recently confirmed this theory by optically observing a single circular nanoparticle coating formed on a boiling surface, where a single-active bubble nucleation site was allowed to undergo several boiling cycles, as shown in Figure 10. Accordingly, nanofluid boiling itself, and specifically microlayer evaporation, is responsible for producing the nanoparticle layer on the surface.


Enhancement of critical heat flux in nucleate boiling of nanofluids: a state-of-art review.

Kim H - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Images of nanparticle coating generated, on the heater surface [28].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211511&req=5

Figure 10: Images of nanparticle coating generated, on the heater surface [28].
Mentions: Before proceeding to the assessment of surface effects on CHF enhancement in nanofluids, a prior question arises: why are nanoparticles deposited on the heater surface during nucleate boiling of nanofluids? Kim et al. [52] reported that the nanoparticle layer developed only during nucleate boiling in nanofluids, but was not caused by gravitational sedimentation or single-phase natural convection. Kim et al. [46] suggested the hypothesis that the evaporation of microlayers initially containing nanoparticles could be the reason for the formation of the porous layer. As vapor bubbles grow, the evaporating liquid leaves behind nanoparticles, which then concentrate at the base of the bubbles, forming the microlayer. As the microlayer evaporates, nanoparticles are again left behind, and they then bond to the hot heater surface. Kwark et al. [28] recently confirmed this theory by optically observing a single circular nanoparticle coating formed on a boiling surface, where a single-active bubble nucleation site was allowed to undergo several boiling cycles, as shown in Figure 10. Accordingly, nanofluid boiling itself, and specifically microlayer evaporation, is responsible for producing the nanoparticle layer on the surface.

Bottom Line: The purpose of this article is to provide an exhaustive review of these studies.Also, attempts to explain the physical mechanism based on available CHF theories are described.Finally, future research needs are identified.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyunggi 446-701, Republic of Korea. hdkims@khu.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT
Nanofluids (suspensions of nanometer-sized particles in base fluids) have recently been shown to have nucleate boiling critical heat flux (CHF) far superior to that of the pure base fluid. Over the past decade, numerous experimental and analytical studies on the nucleate boiling CHF of nanofluids have been conducted. The purpose of this article is to provide an exhaustive review of these studies. The characteristics of CHF enhancement in nanofluids are systemically presented according to the effects of the primary boiling parameters. Research efforts to identify the effects of nanoparticles underlying irregular enhancement phenomena of CHF in nanofluids are then presented. Also, attempts to explain the physical mechanism based on available CHF theories are described. Finally, future research needs are identified.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus