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Peptide immobilisation on porous silicon surface for metal ions detection.

Sam SS, Chazalviel JN, Gouget-Laemmel AC, Ozanam FF, Etcheberry AA, Gabouze NE - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: The recorded cyclic voltammograms show a quasi-irreversible process corresponding to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple.The kinetic factors (the heterogeneous rate constant and the transfer coefficient) and the stability constant of the complex formed on the porous silicon surface are determined.These results demonstrate the potential role of peptides grafted on porous silicon in developing strategies for simple and fast detection of metal ions in solution.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: UDTS, 2 bd Frantz Fanon, BP 140, Alger-7 Merveilles, Algiers, Algeria. sabrina.sam@polytechnique.edu.

ABSTRACT
In this work, a Glycyl-Histidyl-Glycyl-Histidine (GlyHisGlyHis) peptide is covalently anchored to the porous silicon PSi surface using a multi-step reaction scheme compatible with the mild conditions required for preserving the probe activity. In a first step, alkene precursors are grafted onto the hydrogenated PSi surface using the hydrosilylation route, allowing for the formation of a carboxyl-terminated monolayer which is activated by reaction with N-hydroxysuccinimide in the presence of a peptide-coupling carbodiimide N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and subsequently reacted with the amino linker of the peptide to form a covalent amide bond. Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to investigate the different steps of functionalization.The property of peptides to form stable complexes with metal ions is exploited to achieve metal-ion recognition by the peptide-modified PSi-based biosensor. An electrochemical study of the GlyHisGlyHis-modified PSi electrode is achieved in the presence of copper ions. The recorded cyclic voltammograms show a quasi-irreversible process corresponding to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. The kinetic factors (the heterogeneous rate constant and the transfer coefficient) and the stability constant of the complex formed on the porous silicon surface are determined. These results demonstrate the potential role of peptides grafted on porous silicon in developing strategies for simple and fast detection of metal ions in solution.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Plots of the anodic peak potential against logarithm of scan rate for Gly-His-Gly-His-modified PSi after copper accumulation. (a) For all scan rates considered. (b) In the case where Ep > 200 mV.
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Figure 5: Plots of the anodic peak potential against logarithm of scan rate for Gly-His-Gly-His-modified PSi after copper accumulation. (a) For all scan rates considered. (b) In the case where Ep > 200 mV.

Mentions: The degree of kinetic reversibility displayed by a surface redox reaction depends on the scan rate. It is expected [28] that a surface redox reaction will exhibit a reversible behaviour (manifested by a peak potential variation quasi-constant with logarithm of scan rate (ln v) when the scan rate is small, and an irreversible behaviour (indicated by a linear variation of peak potential with ln v) when the scan rate is large. This general prospect was confirmed in our experiments. When the scan rate is higher than 0.02 Vs-1, the cathodic peak potential Epc shifts negatively and the anodic peak potential shifts positively with increasing scan rate. Figure 5 shows plots of the anodic peak potential as a function of the logarithm of the scan rate for a GlyHisGlyHis-modified PSi surface after copper accumulation. This figure shows that the peak potentials are practically invariant when the scan rate is low and in contrast for high scan rate, the peak potentials vary linearly as a function of ln v.


Peptide immobilisation on porous silicon surface for metal ions detection.

Sam SS, Chazalviel JN, Gouget-Laemmel AC, Ozanam FF, Etcheberry AA, Gabouze NE - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Plots of the anodic peak potential against logarithm of scan rate for Gly-His-Gly-His-modified PSi after copper accumulation. (a) For all scan rates considered. (b) In the case where Ep > 200 mV.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211508&req=5

Figure 5: Plots of the anodic peak potential against logarithm of scan rate for Gly-His-Gly-His-modified PSi after copper accumulation. (a) For all scan rates considered. (b) In the case where Ep > 200 mV.
Mentions: The degree of kinetic reversibility displayed by a surface redox reaction depends on the scan rate. It is expected [28] that a surface redox reaction will exhibit a reversible behaviour (manifested by a peak potential variation quasi-constant with logarithm of scan rate (ln v) when the scan rate is small, and an irreversible behaviour (indicated by a linear variation of peak potential with ln v) when the scan rate is large. This general prospect was confirmed in our experiments. When the scan rate is higher than 0.02 Vs-1, the cathodic peak potential Epc shifts negatively and the anodic peak potential shifts positively with increasing scan rate. Figure 5 shows plots of the anodic peak potential as a function of the logarithm of the scan rate for a GlyHisGlyHis-modified PSi surface after copper accumulation. This figure shows that the peak potentials are practically invariant when the scan rate is low and in contrast for high scan rate, the peak potentials vary linearly as a function of ln v.

Bottom Line: The recorded cyclic voltammograms show a quasi-irreversible process corresponding to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple.The kinetic factors (the heterogeneous rate constant and the transfer coefficient) and the stability constant of the complex formed on the porous silicon surface are determined.These results demonstrate the potential role of peptides grafted on porous silicon in developing strategies for simple and fast detection of metal ions in solution.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: UDTS, 2 bd Frantz Fanon, BP 140, Alger-7 Merveilles, Algiers, Algeria. sabrina.sam@polytechnique.edu.

ABSTRACT
In this work, a Glycyl-Histidyl-Glycyl-Histidine (GlyHisGlyHis) peptide is covalently anchored to the porous silicon PSi surface using a multi-step reaction scheme compatible with the mild conditions required for preserving the probe activity. In a first step, alkene precursors are grafted onto the hydrogenated PSi surface using the hydrosilylation route, allowing for the formation of a carboxyl-terminated monolayer which is activated by reaction with N-hydroxysuccinimide in the presence of a peptide-coupling carbodiimide N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and subsequently reacted with the amino linker of the peptide to form a covalent amide bond. Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to investigate the different steps of functionalization.The property of peptides to form stable complexes with metal ions is exploited to achieve metal-ion recognition by the peptide-modified PSi-based biosensor. An electrochemical study of the GlyHisGlyHis-modified PSi electrode is achieved in the presence of copper ions. The recorded cyclic voltammograms show a quasi-irreversible process corresponding to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. The kinetic factors (the heterogeneous rate constant and the transfer coefficient) and the stability constant of the complex formed on the porous silicon surface are determined. These results demonstrate the potential role of peptides grafted on porous silicon in developing strategies for simple and fast detection of metal ions in solution.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus