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Tuning photoluminescence of organic rubrene nanoparticles through a hydrothermal process.

Kim MS, Cho EH, Park DH, Jung H, Bang J, Joo J - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: The light-emitting color distribution of the NPs was confirmed using confocal laser spectrum microscope.Filtered-up rubrene NPs treated at 170°C and 180°C exhibited blue luminescence due to the decrease of intermolecular excimer densities with the rapid increase in size.Variations in PL of hydrothermally treated rubrene NPs resulted from different size distributions of the NPs.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, Korea University, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713, Korea. jjoo@korea.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT
Light-emitting 5,6,11,12-tetraphenylnaphthacene (rubrene) nanoparticles (NPs) prepared by a reprecipitation method were treated hydrothermally. The diameters of hydrothermally treated rubrene NPs were changed from 100 nm to 2 μm, depending on hydrothermal temperature. Photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of rubrene NPs varied with hydrothermal temperatures. Luminescence of pristine rubrene NPs was yellow-orange, and it changed to blue as the hydrothermal temperature increased to 180°C. The light-emitting color distribution of the NPs was confirmed using confocal laser spectrum microscope. As the hydrothermal temperature increased from 110°C to 160°C, the blue light emission at 464 to approximately 516 nm from filtered-down NPs was enhanced by H-type aggregation. Filtered-up rubrene NPs treated at 170°C and 180°C exhibited blue luminescence due to the decrease of intermolecular excimer densities with the rapid increase in size. Variations in PL of hydrothermally treated rubrene NPs resulted from different size distributions of the NPs.

No MeSH data available.


SEM images. (a) Unfiltered pristine and (b) HT-110, (c) HT-130, (d) HT-150, (e) HT-160, and (f) HT-180 rubrene NPs. Inset of Figure 1a: Schematic chemical structure of rubrene molecule. Insets of Figure 1b, d, e, and f: HR-TEM images of corresponding HT rubrene NPs.
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Figure 1: SEM images. (a) Unfiltered pristine and (b) HT-110, (c) HT-130, (d) HT-150, (e) HT-160, and (f) HT-180 rubrene NPs. Inset of Figure 1a: Schematic chemical structure of rubrene molecule. Insets of Figure 1b, d, e, and f: HR-TEM images of corresponding HT rubrene NPs.

Mentions: Figure 1a, b, c, d, e, f and their insets show the SEM and HR-TEM images of the unfiltered pristine and HT rubrene NPs, respectively. Pristine NPs were spherical with diameters of 100 nm to approximately 200 nm (Figure 1a). The diameters of HT-110 rubrene NPs were 100 nm to approximately 250 nm (Figure 1b), and some had a nanohole of ≤20 nm on the surface. The inset of Figure 1b shows an HR-TEM image of HT-110 rubrene NPs with nanoholes. As shown in Figure 1c, HT-130 rubrene NPs have diameters of 100 nm to approximately 500 nm, some with nanoholes on the surface. We can suggest that the formation of nanoholes on the rubrene NPs might be due to the aggregation of the pristine NPs during the hydrothermal process, in which the empty spaces between the NPs could be existed and induced the nanoholes [30]. Diameters of the HT-150 NPs were 100 nm to approximately 900 nm (Figure 1d). The shapes of HT-160 and HT-180 rubrene NPs were similar to those of HT-150 NPs, and their diameters increased to 100 nm to approximately 900 and 200 nm to approximately 2 μm, respectively (Figure 1e, f). The average diameters of the unfiltered HT rubrene NPs were increased with increasing hydrothermal temperatures.


Tuning photoluminescence of organic rubrene nanoparticles through a hydrothermal process.

Kim MS, Cho EH, Park DH, Jung H, Bang J, Joo J - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

SEM images. (a) Unfiltered pristine and (b) HT-110, (c) HT-130, (d) HT-150, (e) HT-160, and (f) HT-180 rubrene NPs. Inset of Figure 1a: Schematic chemical structure of rubrene molecule. Insets of Figure 1b, d, e, and f: HR-TEM images of corresponding HT rubrene NPs.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 1: SEM images. (a) Unfiltered pristine and (b) HT-110, (c) HT-130, (d) HT-150, (e) HT-160, and (f) HT-180 rubrene NPs. Inset of Figure 1a: Schematic chemical structure of rubrene molecule. Insets of Figure 1b, d, e, and f: HR-TEM images of corresponding HT rubrene NPs.
Mentions: Figure 1a, b, c, d, e, f and their insets show the SEM and HR-TEM images of the unfiltered pristine and HT rubrene NPs, respectively. Pristine NPs were spherical with diameters of 100 nm to approximately 200 nm (Figure 1a). The diameters of HT-110 rubrene NPs were 100 nm to approximately 250 nm (Figure 1b), and some had a nanohole of ≤20 nm on the surface. The inset of Figure 1b shows an HR-TEM image of HT-110 rubrene NPs with nanoholes. As shown in Figure 1c, HT-130 rubrene NPs have diameters of 100 nm to approximately 500 nm, some with nanoholes on the surface. We can suggest that the formation of nanoholes on the rubrene NPs might be due to the aggregation of the pristine NPs during the hydrothermal process, in which the empty spaces between the NPs could be existed and induced the nanoholes [30]. Diameters of the HT-150 NPs were 100 nm to approximately 900 nm (Figure 1d). The shapes of HT-160 and HT-180 rubrene NPs were similar to those of HT-150 NPs, and their diameters increased to 100 nm to approximately 900 and 200 nm to approximately 2 μm, respectively (Figure 1e, f). The average diameters of the unfiltered HT rubrene NPs were increased with increasing hydrothermal temperatures.

Bottom Line: The light-emitting color distribution of the NPs was confirmed using confocal laser spectrum microscope.Filtered-up rubrene NPs treated at 170°C and 180°C exhibited blue luminescence due to the decrease of intermolecular excimer densities with the rapid increase in size.Variations in PL of hydrothermally treated rubrene NPs resulted from different size distributions of the NPs.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, Korea University, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713, Korea. jjoo@korea.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT
Light-emitting 5,6,11,12-tetraphenylnaphthacene (rubrene) nanoparticles (NPs) prepared by a reprecipitation method were treated hydrothermally. The diameters of hydrothermally treated rubrene NPs were changed from 100 nm to 2 μm, depending on hydrothermal temperature. Photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of rubrene NPs varied with hydrothermal temperatures. Luminescence of pristine rubrene NPs was yellow-orange, and it changed to blue as the hydrothermal temperature increased to 180°C. The light-emitting color distribution of the NPs was confirmed using confocal laser spectrum microscope. As the hydrothermal temperature increased from 110°C to 160°C, the blue light emission at 464 to approximately 516 nm from filtered-down NPs was enhanced by H-type aggregation. Filtered-up rubrene NPs treated at 170°C and 180°C exhibited blue luminescence due to the decrease of intermolecular excimer densities with the rapid increase in size. Variations in PL of hydrothermally treated rubrene NPs resulted from different size distributions of the NPs.

No MeSH data available.