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Hyperspectral optical imaging of two different species of lepidoptera.

Medina JM, Nascimento SM, Vukusic P - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: Color coordinates from reflectance spectra were calculated taking into account human spectral sensitivity.For each butterfly wing, the observed color is described by a characteristic color map in the chromaticity diagram and spreads over a limited volume in the color space.The results suggest that variability in the reflectance spectra is correlated with different random arrangements in the spatial distribution of the scales that cover the wing membranes.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre of Physics, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, Braga, 4710-057, Portugal. jmanuel@fisica.uminho.pt.

ABSTRACT
In this article, we report a hyperspectral optical imaging application for measurement of the reflectance spectra of photonic structures that produce structural colors with high spatial resolution. The measurement of the spectral reflectance function is exemplified in the butterfly wings of two different species of Lepidoptera: the blue iridescence reflected by the nymphalid Morpho didius and the green iridescence of the papilionid Papilio palinurus. Color coordinates from reflectance spectra were calculated taking into account human spectral sensitivity. For each butterfly wing, the observed color is described by a characteristic color map in the chromaticity diagram and spreads over a limited volume in the color space. The results suggest that variability in the reflectance spectra is correlated with different random arrangements in the spatial distribution of the scales that cover the wing membranes. Hyperspectral optical imaging opens new ways for the non-invasive study and classification of different forms of irregularity in structural colors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic view of the hyperspectral imaging acquisition system. Light from the Xenon lamp converges into a LCTF and is projected into the sample using two mirrors. The mirrors also provide the fine adjustment of the illumination angle. Light reflected from the butterfly wing is recorded by a monochrome CCD camera for further processing.
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Figure 1: Schematic view of the hyperspectral imaging acquisition system. Light from the Xenon lamp converges into a LCTF and is projected into the sample using two mirrors. The mirrors also provide the fine adjustment of the illumination angle. Light reflected from the butterfly wing is recorded by a monochrome CCD camera for further processing.

Mentions: Figure 1 represents a schematic view of the hyperspectral imaging system. The experimental device consisted of an illumination source or xenon lamp filtered with an ultraviolet and an infrared filter. The light was collimated using a standard convergent lens and a circular diaphragm. A liquid crystal tunable filter (LCTF) (Varispec VS-VIS2-10HC-35-SQ, Cambridge Research and Instrumentation, Inc., Boston, MA, USA) was mounted in front of the light source.


Hyperspectral optical imaging of two different species of lepidoptera.

Medina JM, Nascimento SM, Vukusic P - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Schematic view of the hyperspectral imaging acquisition system. Light from the Xenon lamp converges into a LCTF and is projected into the sample using two mirrors. The mirrors also provide the fine adjustment of the illumination angle. Light reflected from the butterfly wing is recorded by a monochrome CCD camera for further processing.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211459&req=5

Figure 1: Schematic view of the hyperspectral imaging acquisition system. Light from the Xenon lamp converges into a LCTF and is projected into the sample using two mirrors. The mirrors also provide the fine adjustment of the illumination angle. Light reflected from the butterfly wing is recorded by a monochrome CCD camera for further processing.
Mentions: Figure 1 represents a schematic view of the hyperspectral imaging system. The experimental device consisted of an illumination source or xenon lamp filtered with an ultraviolet and an infrared filter. The light was collimated using a standard convergent lens and a circular diaphragm. A liquid crystal tunable filter (LCTF) (Varispec VS-VIS2-10HC-35-SQ, Cambridge Research and Instrumentation, Inc., Boston, MA, USA) was mounted in front of the light source.

Bottom Line: Color coordinates from reflectance spectra were calculated taking into account human spectral sensitivity.For each butterfly wing, the observed color is described by a characteristic color map in the chromaticity diagram and spreads over a limited volume in the color space.The results suggest that variability in the reflectance spectra is correlated with different random arrangements in the spatial distribution of the scales that cover the wing membranes.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre of Physics, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, Braga, 4710-057, Portugal. jmanuel@fisica.uminho.pt.

ABSTRACT
In this article, we report a hyperspectral optical imaging application for measurement of the reflectance spectra of photonic structures that produce structural colors with high spatial resolution. The measurement of the spectral reflectance function is exemplified in the butterfly wings of two different species of Lepidoptera: the blue iridescence reflected by the nymphalid Morpho didius and the green iridescence of the papilionid Papilio palinurus. Color coordinates from reflectance spectra were calculated taking into account human spectral sensitivity. For each butterfly wing, the observed color is described by a characteristic color map in the chromaticity diagram and spreads over a limited volume in the color space. The results suggest that variability in the reflectance spectra is correlated with different random arrangements in the spatial distribution of the scales that cover the wing membranes. Hyperspectral optical imaging opens new ways for the non-invasive study and classification of different forms of irregularity in structural colors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus