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β -Phase Morphology in Ordered Poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) Nanopillars by Template Wetting Method

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ABSTRACT

An efficient method based in template wetting is applied for fabrication of ordered Poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO) nanopillars with β-phase morphology. In this process, nanoporous alumina obtained by anodization process is used as template. PFO nanostructures are prepared under ambient conditions via infiltration of the polymeric solution into the pores of the alumina with an average pore diameter of 225 nm and a pore depth of 500 nm. The geometric features of the resulting structures are characterized with environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), luminescence fluorimeter (PL) and micro μ-X-ray diffractometer (μ-XRD). The characterization demonstrates the β-phase of the PFO in the nanopillars fabricated. Furthermore, the PFO nanopillars are characterized by Raman spectroscopy to study the polymer conformation. These ordered nanostructures can be used in optoelectronic applications such as polymer light-emitting diodes, sensors and organic solar cells.

No MeSH data available.


a UV–Vis absorption and PL spectra of PFO solution, PFO film and PFO nanopillars. b X-ray diffraction patterns of PFO film and PFO nanopillars (curves are offset for clarity).
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Figure 2: a UV–Vis absorption and PL spectra of PFO solution, PFO film and PFO nanopillars. b X-ray diffraction patterns of PFO film and PFO nanopillars (curves are offset for clarity).

Mentions: Figure 2 shows the UV–Vis absorbance spectra of a PFO solution in chloroform and a PFO film. The nanopillars spectrum was not possible measured due to the high concentration of the solution that we used in order to fabricate the structures. The solution absorption spectra exhibited a band at 373–395 nm assigned to the S0 → S1 0-0 transition of PFO. The film spectrum was red-shifted and broader with a band at 388 nm and a low-energy shoulder at 435 nm characteristic of β-phase PFO [4,19,20].


β -Phase Morphology in Ordered Poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) Nanopillars by Template Wetting Method
a UV–Vis absorption and PL spectra of PFO solution, PFO film and PFO nanopillars. b X-ray diffraction patterns of PFO film and PFO nanopillars (curves are offset for clarity).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211439&req=5

Figure 2: a UV–Vis absorption and PL spectra of PFO solution, PFO film and PFO nanopillars. b X-ray diffraction patterns of PFO film and PFO nanopillars (curves are offset for clarity).
Mentions: Figure 2 shows the UV–Vis absorbance spectra of a PFO solution in chloroform and a PFO film. The nanopillars spectrum was not possible measured due to the high concentration of the solution that we used in order to fabricate the structures. The solution absorption spectra exhibited a band at 373–395 nm assigned to the S0 → S1 0-0 transition of PFO. The film spectrum was red-shifted and broader with a band at 388 nm and a low-energy shoulder at 435 nm characteristic of β-phase PFO [4,19,20].

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT

An efficient method based in template wetting is applied for fabrication of ordered Poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO) nanopillars with β-phase morphology. In this process, nanoporous alumina obtained by anodization process is used as template. PFO nanostructures are prepared under ambient conditions via infiltration of the polymeric solution into the pores of the alumina with an average pore diameter of 225 nm and a pore depth of 500 nm. The geometric features of the resulting structures are characterized with environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), luminescence fluorimeter (PL) and micro μ-X-ray diffractometer (μ-XRD). The characterization demonstrates the β-phase of the PFO in the nanopillars fabricated. Furthermore, the PFO nanopillars are characterized by Raman spectroscopy to study the polymer conformation. These ordered nanostructures can be used in optoelectronic applications such as polymer light-emitting diodes, sensors and organic solar cells.

No MeSH data available.