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Flame synthesis of carbon nanostructures on Ni-plated hardmetal substrates.

Zhu H, Kuang T, Zhu B, Lei S, Liu Z, Ringer SP - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: In this article, we demonstrate that carbon nanostructures could be synthesized on the Ni-plated YG6 (WC-6 wt% Co) hardmetal substrate by a simple ethanol diffusion flame method.The growth mechanism of such carbon nanostructures is discussed.This work may provide a strategy to improve the performance of hardmetal products and thus to widen their potential applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Analytical and Testing Center, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, China. tckuang@scut.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
In this article, we demonstrate that carbon nanostructures could be synthesized on the Ni-plated YG6 (WC-6 wt% Co) hardmetal substrate by a simple ethanol diffusion flame method. The morphologies and microstructures of the Ni-plated layer and the carbon nanostructures were examined by various techniques including scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. The growth mechanism of such carbon nanostructures is discussed. This work may provide a strategy to improve the performance of hardmetal products and thus to widen their potential applications.

No MeSH data available.


The XRD patterns of the Ni-plated substrate and the flame-deposited products for different time lengths. (a) the Ni-plated substrate, (b) the 30-min sample and (c) the 60-min sample.
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Figure 5: The XRD patterns of the Ni-plated substrate and the flame-deposited products for different time lengths. (a) the Ni-plated substrate, (b) the 30-min sample and (c) the 60-min sample.

Mentions: Figure 5 provides the XRD patterns of the original Ni-plated YG6 hardmetal substrate and the flame-deposited carbon nanostructures. The reflections occurred at around 26.4°, 44.5°, and 77.0° can be attributed to graphite, which correspond to the crystal planes of (002), (101), and (110), respectively, according to the International Centre for Diffraction Data (ICDD, #65-6212)


Flame synthesis of carbon nanostructures on Ni-plated hardmetal substrates.

Zhu H, Kuang T, Zhu B, Lei S, Liu Z, Ringer SP - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

The XRD patterns of the Ni-plated substrate and the flame-deposited products for different time lengths. (a) the Ni-plated substrate, (b) the 30-min sample and (c) the 60-min sample.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211419&req=5

Figure 5: The XRD patterns of the Ni-plated substrate and the flame-deposited products for different time lengths. (a) the Ni-plated substrate, (b) the 30-min sample and (c) the 60-min sample.
Mentions: Figure 5 provides the XRD patterns of the original Ni-plated YG6 hardmetal substrate and the flame-deposited carbon nanostructures. The reflections occurred at around 26.4°, 44.5°, and 77.0° can be attributed to graphite, which correspond to the crystal planes of (002), (101), and (110), respectively, according to the International Centre for Diffraction Data (ICDD, #65-6212)

Bottom Line: In this article, we demonstrate that carbon nanostructures could be synthesized on the Ni-plated YG6 (WC-6 wt% Co) hardmetal substrate by a simple ethanol diffusion flame method.The growth mechanism of such carbon nanostructures is discussed.This work may provide a strategy to improve the performance of hardmetal products and thus to widen their potential applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Analytical and Testing Center, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, China. tckuang@scut.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
In this article, we demonstrate that carbon nanostructures could be synthesized on the Ni-plated YG6 (WC-6 wt% Co) hardmetal substrate by a simple ethanol diffusion flame method. The morphologies and microstructures of the Ni-plated layer and the carbon nanostructures were examined by various techniques including scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. The growth mechanism of such carbon nanostructures is discussed. This work may provide a strategy to improve the performance of hardmetal products and thus to widen their potential applications.

No MeSH data available.