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A comparative study of non-covalent encapsulation methods for organic dyes into silica nanoparticles.

Auger A, Samuel J, Poncelet O, Raccurt O - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: Nevertheless, the behaviour and effect of such luminescent molecules appear to have been much less studied and may possibly prevent the encapsulation process from occurring.Mainly, the photophysical characteristics of the dyes are retained upon their encapsulation into the silica matrix, leading to fluorescent silica nanoparticles.This feature article surveys recent research progress on the fabrication strategies of these dye-doped silica nanoparticles.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: CEA Grenoble, Department of Nano Materials, NanoChemistry and NanoSafety Laboratory (DRT/LITEN/DTNM/LCSN), 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9, France. aurelien.auger@cea.fr.

ABSTRACT
Numerous luminophores may be encapsulated into silica nanoparticles (< 100 nm) using the reverse microemulsion process. Nevertheless, the behaviour and effect of such luminescent molecules appear to have been much less studied and may possibly prevent the encapsulation process from occurring. Such nanospheres represent attractive nanoplatforms for the development of biotargeted biocompatible luminescent tracers. Physical and chemical properties of the encapsulated molecules may be affected by the nanomatrix. This study examines the synthesis of different types of dispersed silica nanoparticles, the ability of the selected luminophores towards incorporation into the silica matrix of those nanoobjects as well as the photophysical properties of the produced dye-doped silica nanoparticles. The nanoparticles present mean diameters between 40 and 60 nm as shown by TEM analysis. Mainly, the photophysical characteristics of the dyes are retained upon their encapsulation into the silica matrix, leading to fluorescent silica nanoparticles. This feature article surveys recent research progress on the fabrication strategies of these dye-doped silica nanoparticles.

No MeSH data available.


Excitation and emission spectra of aqueous solutions of (left) HITC and silica nanoparticles doped with HITC 3e and 4e, and (right) ICG and silica nanoparticles doped with ICG 3f.
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Figure 9: Excitation and emission spectra of aqueous solutions of (left) HITC and silica nanoparticles doped with HITC 3e and 4e, and (right) ICG and silica nanoparticles doped with ICG 3f.

Mentions: Finally, two cyanine-based near-infrared absorbing dyes (HITC and ICG) were subjected to the four methods of encapsulations involved in this study. Those dyes are commercially available due to their photographic sensitivity and infrared lasers absorption, essential properties to the printing industry. It is also important to notice that, currently, the organic dye ICG is the only near-infrared fluorophores approved by FDA for use in vivo in humans [56]. Aqueous solutions of free-HITC and free-ICG displayed sharp excitation peaks at 734 and 776 nm, respectively, as well as sharp emission peaks at 790 and 806 nm as indicated in Figure 9.


A comparative study of non-covalent encapsulation methods for organic dyes into silica nanoparticles.

Auger A, Samuel J, Poncelet O, Raccurt O - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Excitation and emission spectra of aqueous solutions of (left) HITC and silica nanoparticles doped with HITC 3e and 4e, and (right) ICG and silica nanoparticles doped with ICG 3f.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211415&req=5

Figure 9: Excitation and emission spectra of aqueous solutions of (left) HITC and silica nanoparticles doped with HITC 3e and 4e, and (right) ICG and silica nanoparticles doped with ICG 3f.
Mentions: Finally, two cyanine-based near-infrared absorbing dyes (HITC and ICG) were subjected to the four methods of encapsulations involved in this study. Those dyes are commercially available due to their photographic sensitivity and infrared lasers absorption, essential properties to the printing industry. It is also important to notice that, currently, the organic dye ICG is the only near-infrared fluorophores approved by FDA for use in vivo in humans [56]. Aqueous solutions of free-HITC and free-ICG displayed sharp excitation peaks at 734 and 776 nm, respectively, as well as sharp emission peaks at 790 and 806 nm as indicated in Figure 9.

Bottom Line: Nevertheless, the behaviour and effect of such luminescent molecules appear to have been much less studied and may possibly prevent the encapsulation process from occurring.Mainly, the photophysical characteristics of the dyes are retained upon their encapsulation into the silica matrix, leading to fluorescent silica nanoparticles.This feature article surveys recent research progress on the fabrication strategies of these dye-doped silica nanoparticles.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: CEA Grenoble, Department of Nano Materials, NanoChemistry and NanoSafety Laboratory (DRT/LITEN/DTNM/LCSN), 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9, France. aurelien.auger@cea.fr.

ABSTRACT
Numerous luminophores may be encapsulated into silica nanoparticles (< 100 nm) using the reverse microemulsion process. Nevertheless, the behaviour and effect of such luminescent molecules appear to have been much less studied and may possibly prevent the encapsulation process from occurring. Such nanospheres represent attractive nanoplatforms for the development of biotargeted biocompatible luminescent tracers. Physical and chemical properties of the encapsulated molecules may be affected by the nanomatrix. This study examines the synthesis of different types of dispersed silica nanoparticles, the ability of the selected luminophores towards incorporation into the silica matrix of those nanoobjects as well as the photophysical properties of the produced dye-doped silica nanoparticles. The nanoparticles present mean diameters between 40 and 60 nm as shown by TEM analysis. Mainly, the photophysical characteristics of the dyes are retained upon their encapsulation into the silica matrix, leading to fluorescent silica nanoparticles. This feature article surveys recent research progress on the fabrication strategies of these dye-doped silica nanoparticles.

No MeSH data available.