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A comparative study of non-covalent encapsulation methods for organic dyes into silica nanoparticles.

Auger A, Samuel J, Poncelet O, Raccurt O - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: Nevertheless, the behaviour and effect of such luminescent molecules appear to have been much less studied and may possibly prevent the encapsulation process from occurring.Mainly, the photophysical characteristics of the dyes are retained upon their encapsulation into the silica matrix, leading to fluorescent silica nanoparticles.This feature article surveys recent research progress on the fabrication strategies of these dye-doped silica nanoparticles.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: CEA Grenoble, Department of Nano Materials, NanoChemistry and NanoSafety Laboratory (DRT/LITEN/DTNM/LCSN), 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9, France. aurelien.auger@cea.fr.

ABSTRACT
Numerous luminophores may be encapsulated into silica nanoparticles (< 100 nm) using the reverse microemulsion process. Nevertheless, the behaviour and effect of such luminescent molecules appear to have been much less studied and may possibly prevent the encapsulation process from occurring. Such nanospheres represent attractive nanoplatforms for the development of biotargeted biocompatible luminescent tracers. Physical and chemical properties of the encapsulated molecules may be affected by the nanomatrix. This study examines the synthesis of different types of dispersed silica nanoparticles, the ability of the selected luminophores towards incorporation into the silica matrix of those nanoobjects as well as the photophysical properties of the produced dye-doped silica nanoparticles. The nanoparticles present mean diameters between 40 and 60 nm as shown by TEM analysis. Mainly, the photophysical characteristics of the dyes are retained upon their encapsulation into the silica matrix, leading to fluorescent silica nanoparticles. This feature article surveys recent research progress on the fabrication strategies of these dye-doped silica nanoparticles.

No MeSH data available.


Names and structures of the different dyes and fluorophores used during the study.
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Figure 1: Names and structures of the different dyes and fluorophores used during the study.

Mentions: We have synthesised luminescent probes based on silica nanoparticles embedded with different hydrophilic and organic dyes (Figure 1). The criteria and the parameters required to properly encapsulating those fluorophores within the silica shell have been investigated and seem to differ from one fluorophore to another. The success of relatively good encapsulation tends to be related to the structure of the selected dye. The first series of silica nanoparticles, 1a-h, was prepared using the recently developed W/O microemulsion method proposed by Bagwe et al. [28] This regular synthesis involved the use of Triton X100, n-hexanol, cyclohexane and water to prepare the microemulsion. The desired dye (Rhodamine B, Fluorescein, PABI, PPC, IR 806, NBA, HITC, ICG see Figure 1 for full names and structures) was dissolved in the aqueous phase at a concentration of 0.1 M in 200 μl, and injected in the W/O microemulsion system. The second step involves the hydrolysis of TEOS initiated by the addition of aqueous ammonia to the reaction mixture that results in the formation of monodisperse spherical particles of amorphous silica.


A comparative study of non-covalent encapsulation methods for organic dyes into silica nanoparticles.

Auger A, Samuel J, Poncelet O, Raccurt O - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Names and structures of the different dyes and fluorophores used during the study.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211415&req=5

Figure 1: Names and structures of the different dyes and fluorophores used during the study.
Mentions: We have synthesised luminescent probes based on silica nanoparticles embedded with different hydrophilic and organic dyes (Figure 1). The criteria and the parameters required to properly encapsulating those fluorophores within the silica shell have been investigated and seem to differ from one fluorophore to another. The success of relatively good encapsulation tends to be related to the structure of the selected dye. The first series of silica nanoparticles, 1a-h, was prepared using the recently developed W/O microemulsion method proposed by Bagwe et al. [28] This regular synthesis involved the use of Triton X100, n-hexanol, cyclohexane and water to prepare the microemulsion. The desired dye (Rhodamine B, Fluorescein, PABI, PPC, IR 806, NBA, HITC, ICG see Figure 1 for full names and structures) was dissolved in the aqueous phase at a concentration of 0.1 M in 200 μl, and injected in the W/O microemulsion system. The second step involves the hydrolysis of TEOS initiated by the addition of aqueous ammonia to the reaction mixture that results in the formation of monodisperse spherical particles of amorphous silica.

Bottom Line: Nevertheless, the behaviour and effect of such luminescent molecules appear to have been much less studied and may possibly prevent the encapsulation process from occurring.Mainly, the photophysical characteristics of the dyes are retained upon their encapsulation into the silica matrix, leading to fluorescent silica nanoparticles.This feature article surveys recent research progress on the fabrication strategies of these dye-doped silica nanoparticles.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: CEA Grenoble, Department of Nano Materials, NanoChemistry and NanoSafety Laboratory (DRT/LITEN/DTNM/LCSN), 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9, France. aurelien.auger@cea.fr.

ABSTRACT
Numerous luminophores may be encapsulated into silica nanoparticles (< 100 nm) using the reverse microemulsion process. Nevertheless, the behaviour and effect of such luminescent molecules appear to have been much less studied and may possibly prevent the encapsulation process from occurring. Such nanospheres represent attractive nanoplatforms for the development of biotargeted biocompatible luminescent tracers. Physical and chemical properties of the encapsulated molecules may be affected by the nanomatrix. This study examines the synthesis of different types of dispersed silica nanoparticles, the ability of the selected luminophores towards incorporation into the silica matrix of those nanoobjects as well as the photophysical properties of the produced dye-doped silica nanoparticles. The nanoparticles present mean diameters between 40 and 60 nm as shown by TEM analysis. Mainly, the photophysical characteristics of the dyes are retained upon their encapsulation into the silica matrix, leading to fluorescent silica nanoparticles. This feature article surveys recent research progress on the fabrication strategies of these dye-doped silica nanoparticles.

No MeSH data available.