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Organic nanofibers integrated by transfer technique in field-effect transistor devices.

Tavares L, Kjelstrup-Hansen J, Thilsing-Hansen K, Rubahn HG - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: Bottom contact devices are dominated by contact effects, while the top contact device characteristics are determined by the nanofiber bulk properties.It is found that the contact resistance is lower for crystalline nanofibers when compared to amorphous thin films.These results shed light on the charge injection and transport properties for such organic nanostructures and thus constitute a significant step forward toward a nanofiber-based light-emitting device.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: NanoSYD, Mads Clausen Institute, University of Southern Denmark, Alsion 2, DK-6400 Sønderborg, Denmark. tavares@mci.sdu.dk.

ABSTRACT
The electrical properties of self-assembled organic crystalline nanofibers are studied by integrating these on field-effect transistor platforms using both top and bottom contact configurations. In the staggered geometries, where the nanofibers are sandwiched between the gate and the source-drain electrodes, a better electrical conduction is observed when compared to the coplanar geometry where the nanofibers are placed over the gate and the source-drain electrodes. Qualitatively different output characteristics were observed for top and bottom contact devices reflecting the significantly different contact resistances. Bottom contact devices are dominated by contact effects, while the top contact device characteristics are determined by the nanofiber bulk properties. It is found that the contact resistance is lower for crystalline nanofibers when compared to amorphous thin films. These results shed light on the charge injection and transport properties for such organic nanostructures and thus constitute a significant step forward toward a nanofiber-based light-emitting device.

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The three different configurations used: (a) BC/BG, (b) TC/BG, and (c) BC/TG. (d) Drawing of a device with TC/BG configuration prepared by deposition of the top contacts through a nanostencil.
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Figure 1: The three different configurations used: (a) BC/BG, (b) TC/BG, and (c) BC/TG. (d) Drawing of a device with TC/BG configuration prepared by deposition of the top contacts through a nanostencil.

Mentions: The type 1 devices, which had a bottom contact/bottom gate (BC/BG, see Figure 1a) configuration, were ready for characterization directly after nanofiber transfer and annealing using the underlying highly doped silicon as the gate electrode. The type 2 devices had a top contact/bottom gate (TC/BG, see Figure 1b) configuration, and were prepared by depositing gold electrodes in high vacuum (range of 10-6 mbar) on top of the transferred and annealed nanofibers through a nanostencil [28] with a pattern that gives top electrodes with the same dimensions as those used for the bottom contacts. In both bottom and top contact configurations, the contacts had dimensions of 10 μm × 200 μm, separated by a channel length of around 2 μm. Figure 1d shows an illustration of a TC/BG device with top contacts prepared by deposition through a stencil. The device type 3 was also a staggered configuration in a bottom contact/top gate (BC/TG, see Figure 1c) geometry.


Organic nanofibers integrated by transfer technique in field-effect transistor devices.

Tavares L, Kjelstrup-Hansen J, Thilsing-Hansen K, Rubahn HG - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

The three different configurations used: (a) BC/BG, (b) TC/BG, and (c) BC/TG. (d) Drawing of a device with TC/BG configuration prepared by deposition of the top contacts through a nanostencil.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211406&req=5

Figure 1: The three different configurations used: (a) BC/BG, (b) TC/BG, and (c) BC/TG. (d) Drawing of a device with TC/BG configuration prepared by deposition of the top contacts through a nanostencil.
Mentions: The type 1 devices, which had a bottom contact/bottom gate (BC/BG, see Figure 1a) configuration, were ready for characterization directly after nanofiber transfer and annealing using the underlying highly doped silicon as the gate electrode. The type 2 devices had a top contact/bottom gate (TC/BG, see Figure 1b) configuration, and were prepared by depositing gold electrodes in high vacuum (range of 10-6 mbar) on top of the transferred and annealed nanofibers through a nanostencil [28] with a pattern that gives top electrodes with the same dimensions as those used for the bottom contacts. In both bottom and top contact configurations, the contacts had dimensions of 10 μm × 200 μm, separated by a channel length of around 2 μm. Figure 1d shows an illustration of a TC/BG device with top contacts prepared by deposition through a stencil. The device type 3 was also a staggered configuration in a bottom contact/top gate (BC/TG, see Figure 1c) geometry.

Bottom Line: Bottom contact devices are dominated by contact effects, while the top contact device characteristics are determined by the nanofiber bulk properties.It is found that the contact resistance is lower for crystalline nanofibers when compared to amorphous thin films.These results shed light on the charge injection and transport properties for such organic nanostructures and thus constitute a significant step forward toward a nanofiber-based light-emitting device.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: NanoSYD, Mads Clausen Institute, University of Southern Denmark, Alsion 2, DK-6400 Sønderborg, Denmark. tavares@mci.sdu.dk.

ABSTRACT
The electrical properties of self-assembled organic crystalline nanofibers are studied by integrating these on field-effect transistor platforms using both top and bottom contact configurations. In the staggered geometries, where the nanofibers are sandwiched between the gate and the source-drain electrodes, a better electrical conduction is observed when compared to the coplanar geometry where the nanofibers are placed over the gate and the source-drain electrodes. Qualitatively different output characteristics were observed for top and bottom contact devices reflecting the significantly different contact resistances. Bottom contact devices are dominated by contact effects, while the top contact device characteristics are determined by the nanofiber bulk properties. It is found that the contact resistance is lower for crystalline nanofibers when compared to amorphous thin films. These results shed light on the charge injection and transport properties for such organic nanostructures and thus constitute a significant step forward toward a nanofiber-based light-emitting device.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus