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Wettability of amorphous and nanocrystalline Fe78B13Si9 substrates by molten Sn and Bi.

Shen P, Sun J, Yang J, Qi Y, Jiang Q - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: The wettability of amorphous and annealing-induced nanocrystalline Fe78B13Si9 ribbons by molten Sn and Bi at 600 K was measured using an improved sessile drop method.The results demonstrate that the structural relaxation and crystallization in the amorphous substrates do not substantially change the wettability with molten Bi because of their invariable physical interaction, but remarkably deteriorate the wettability and interfacial bonding with molten Sn as a result of changing a chemical interaction to a physical one for the atoms at the interface.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130025, PR China. shenping@jlu.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
The wettability of amorphous and annealing-induced nanocrystalline Fe78B13Si9 ribbons by molten Sn and Bi at 600 K was measured using an improved sessile drop method. The results demonstrate that the structural relaxation and crystallization in the amorphous substrates do not substantially change the wettability with molten Bi because of their invariable physical interaction, but remarkably deteriorate the wettability and interfacial bonding with molten Sn as a result of changing a chemical interaction to a physical one for the atoms at the interface.

No MeSH data available.


Variations in contact angle with time at the constant wetting temperature of 600 K (upper) and variations in the initial and final contact angles with the substrate annealing temperature (lower). (a, c) for the Bi/Fe78B13Si9 system and (b, d) for the Sn/Fe78B13Si9 system.
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Figure 2: Variations in contact angle with time at the constant wetting temperature of 600 K (upper) and variations in the initial and final contact angles with the substrate annealing temperature (lower). (a, c) for the Bi/Fe78B13Si9 system and (b, d) for the Sn/Fe78B13Si9 system.

Mentions: Figure 2a, b shows the variations in contact angle with time during the isothermal (600 K) wetting tests of the Bi and Sn drops on the Fe78B13Si9 ribbons annealed at different temperatures, and Figure 2c, d show the variations in the initial (at t = 0 s) and final (after wetting for 1 h) contact angles with Ta, respectively. For the Bi/Fe78B13Si9 system, the contact angles remained almost constant during the 1-h isothermal dwell and they did not vary noticeably with Ta, even though a slightly larger value was observed at temperatures approaching the critical crystallization point (i.e., 725 K according to Figure 1a). Clearly, the Fe78B13Si9 ribbons could not be wetted by molten Bi, regardless of the annealing temperature, or more exactly, of the substrate structure and phase changes as well as grain growth. However, for the Sn/Fe78B13Si9 system, despite the fact that the initial contact angles do not vary considerably with Ta, the final contact angles and the wetting dynamics indeed do, particularly for the substrates being in the apparently amorphous state (i.e., when Ta is lower than 725 K). In this range, the contact angle decreased first rapidly and then progressively with time. The lower the annealing temperature, the faster the spreading rate, suggesting that structural relaxation in the amorphous substrates gives rise to an appreciable decrease in the wettability. As Ta approached 725 K, the triple line of the liquid drop advanced very slowly and even stopped moving, indicating that the primary crystallization significantly deteriorates the wettability. After the crystallization, similar to that in the Bi/Fe78B13Si9 system, the contact angle did no longer change with time, nor with the annealing temperature. In this sense, the nanocrystalline Fe78B13Si9 substrates possess much poorer wettability by molten Sn compared with their amorphous counterparts.


Wettability of amorphous and nanocrystalline Fe78B13Si9 substrates by molten Sn and Bi.

Shen P, Sun J, Yang J, Qi Y, Jiang Q - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Variations in contact angle with time at the constant wetting temperature of 600 K (upper) and variations in the initial and final contact angles with the substrate annealing temperature (lower). (a, c) for the Bi/Fe78B13Si9 system and (b, d) for the Sn/Fe78B13Si9 system.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211405&req=5

Figure 2: Variations in contact angle with time at the constant wetting temperature of 600 K (upper) and variations in the initial and final contact angles with the substrate annealing temperature (lower). (a, c) for the Bi/Fe78B13Si9 system and (b, d) for the Sn/Fe78B13Si9 system.
Mentions: Figure 2a, b shows the variations in contact angle with time during the isothermal (600 K) wetting tests of the Bi and Sn drops on the Fe78B13Si9 ribbons annealed at different temperatures, and Figure 2c, d show the variations in the initial (at t = 0 s) and final (after wetting for 1 h) contact angles with Ta, respectively. For the Bi/Fe78B13Si9 system, the contact angles remained almost constant during the 1-h isothermal dwell and they did not vary noticeably with Ta, even though a slightly larger value was observed at temperatures approaching the critical crystallization point (i.e., 725 K according to Figure 1a). Clearly, the Fe78B13Si9 ribbons could not be wetted by molten Bi, regardless of the annealing temperature, or more exactly, of the substrate structure and phase changes as well as grain growth. However, for the Sn/Fe78B13Si9 system, despite the fact that the initial contact angles do not vary considerably with Ta, the final contact angles and the wetting dynamics indeed do, particularly for the substrates being in the apparently amorphous state (i.e., when Ta is lower than 725 K). In this range, the contact angle decreased first rapidly and then progressively with time. The lower the annealing temperature, the faster the spreading rate, suggesting that structural relaxation in the amorphous substrates gives rise to an appreciable decrease in the wettability. As Ta approached 725 K, the triple line of the liquid drop advanced very slowly and even stopped moving, indicating that the primary crystallization significantly deteriorates the wettability. After the crystallization, similar to that in the Bi/Fe78B13Si9 system, the contact angle did no longer change with time, nor with the annealing temperature. In this sense, the nanocrystalline Fe78B13Si9 substrates possess much poorer wettability by molten Sn compared with their amorphous counterparts.

Bottom Line: The wettability of amorphous and annealing-induced nanocrystalline Fe78B13Si9 ribbons by molten Sn and Bi at 600 K was measured using an improved sessile drop method.The results demonstrate that the structural relaxation and crystallization in the amorphous substrates do not substantially change the wettability with molten Bi because of their invariable physical interaction, but remarkably deteriorate the wettability and interfacial bonding with molten Sn as a result of changing a chemical interaction to a physical one for the atoms at the interface.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130025, PR China. shenping@jlu.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
The wettability of amorphous and annealing-induced nanocrystalline Fe78B13Si9 ribbons by molten Sn and Bi at 600 K was measured using an improved sessile drop method. The results demonstrate that the structural relaxation and crystallization in the amorphous substrates do not substantially change the wettability with molten Bi because of their invariable physical interaction, but remarkably deteriorate the wettability and interfacial bonding with molten Sn as a result of changing a chemical interaction to a physical one for the atoms at the interface.

No MeSH data available.