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Mechanical tuning of molecular machines for nucleotide recognition at the air-water interface.

Mori T, Okamoto K, Endo H, Sakakibara K, Hill JP, Shinoda S, Matsukura M, Tsukube H, Suzuki Y, Kanekiyo Y, Ariga K - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: Molecular machines embedded in a Langmuir monolayer at the air-water interface can be operated by application of lateral pressure.As part of the challenge associated with versatile sensing of biologically important substances, we here demonstrate discrimination of nucleotides by applying a cholesterol-armed-triazacyclononane host molecule.The concept of mechanical tuning of the host structure for optimization of molecular recognition should become a novel methodology in bio-related nanotechnology as an alternative to traditional strategies based on increasingly complex and inconvenient molecular design strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: World Premier International (WPI) Research Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044, Japan. ARIGA.Katsuhiko@nims.go.jp.

ABSTRACT
Molecular machines embedded in a Langmuir monolayer at the air-water interface can be operated by application of lateral pressure. As part of the challenge associated with versatile sensing of biologically important substances, we here demonstrate discrimination of nucleotides by applying a cholesterol-armed-triazacyclononane host molecule. This molecular machine can discriminate ribonucleotides based on a twofold to tenfold difference in binding constants under optimized conditions including accompanying ions in the subphase and lateral surface pressures of its Langmuir monolayer. The concept of mechanical tuning of the host structure for optimization of molecular recognition should become a novel methodology in bio-related nanotechnology as an alternative to traditional strategies based on increasingly complex and inconvenient molecular design strategies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Binding constant (K) of AMP, CMP, GMP, and UMP to the monolayer of 1 at various surface pressures at 20°C: (A) without LiCl and (B) with 10 mM of LiCl.
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Figure 4: Binding constant (K) of AMP, CMP, GMP, and UMP to the monolayer of 1 at various surface pressures at 20°C: (A) without LiCl and (B) with 10 mM of LiCl.

Mentions: π-A isotherms of the molecular machine 1 with four different ribonucleotides (AMP, CMP, GMP, and UMP) in the subphase are shown in Figure 2 (on pure water) and Figure 3 (on aqueous solution of [LiCl] = 10 mM). In general, isotherms of 1 under each condition exhibit monotonic increases without phase transitions. Increase in the nucleotide concentration in the subphase shifted the isotherms to larger molecular areas, suggesting that the molecular packing of 1 was disturbed by interaction between the nucleotides and 1 at the air-water interface. According to a reported method [14,16], the shifts in molecular areas at various guest concentrations can be converted into the binding constants (K) of nucleotides to the monolayer of 1 at each surface pressure. The calculated values are summarized in Figure 4. In all the cases, assumption of an equimolecular binding gave the best fitting of the binding curves.


Mechanical tuning of molecular machines for nucleotide recognition at the air-water interface.

Mori T, Okamoto K, Endo H, Sakakibara K, Hill JP, Shinoda S, Matsukura M, Tsukube H, Suzuki Y, Kanekiyo Y, Ariga K - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Binding constant (K) of AMP, CMP, GMP, and UMP to the monolayer of 1 at various surface pressures at 20°C: (A) without LiCl and (B) with 10 mM of LiCl.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211390&req=5

Figure 4: Binding constant (K) of AMP, CMP, GMP, and UMP to the monolayer of 1 at various surface pressures at 20°C: (A) without LiCl and (B) with 10 mM of LiCl.
Mentions: π-A isotherms of the molecular machine 1 with four different ribonucleotides (AMP, CMP, GMP, and UMP) in the subphase are shown in Figure 2 (on pure water) and Figure 3 (on aqueous solution of [LiCl] = 10 mM). In general, isotherms of 1 under each condition exhibit monotonic increases without phase transitions. Increase in the nucleotide concentration in the subphase shifted the isotherms to larger molecular areas, suggesting that the molecular packing of 1 was disturbed by interaction between the nucleotides and 1 at the air-water interface. According to a reported method [14,16], the shifts in molecular areas at various guest concentrations can be converted into the binding constants (K) of nucleotides to the monolayer of 1 at each surface pressure. The calculated values are summarized in Figure 4. In all the cases, assumption of an equimolecular binding gave the best fitting of the binding curves.

Bottom Line: Molecular machines embedded in a Langmuir monolayer at the air-water interface can be operated by application of lateral pressure.As part of the challenge associated with versatile sensing of biologically important substances, we here demonstrate discrimination of nucleotides by applying a cholesterol-armed-triazacyclononane host molecule.The concept of mechanical tuning of the host structure for optimization of molecular recognition should become a novel methodology in bio-related nanotechnology as an alternative to traditional strategies based on increasingly complex and inconvenient molecular design strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: World Premier International (WPI) Research Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044, Japan. ARIGA.Katsuhiko@nims.go.jp.

ABSTRACT
Molecular machines embedded in a Langmuir monolayer at the air-water interface can be operated by application of lateral pressure. As part of the challenge associated with versatile sensing of biologically important substances, we here demonstrate discrimination of nucleotides by applying a cholesterol-armed-triazacyclononane host molecule. This molecular machine can discriminate ribonucleotides based on a twofold to tenfold difference in binding constants under optimized conditions including accompanying ions in the subphase and lateral surface pressures of its Langmuir monolayer. The concept of mechanical tuning of the host structure for optimization of molecular recognition should become a novel methodology in bio-related nanotechnology as an alternative to traditional strategies based on increasingly complex and inconvenient molecular design strategies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus