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Synthesis of carbon nanotubes with and without catalyst particles.

Rümmeli MH, Bachmatiuk A, Börrnert F, Schäffel F, Ibrahim I, Cendrowski K, Simha-Martynkova G, Plachá D, Borowiak-Palen E, Cuniberti G, Büchner B - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: More recently, noble metals (e.g. Au) and poor metals (e.g. In, Pb) have been shown to also yield carbon nanotubes.All-carbon systems for carbon nanotube growth without any catalytic particles have also been demonstrated.These different growth systems are briefly examined in this article and serve to highlight the breadth of avenues available for carbon nanotube synthesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: IFW Dresden, P,O, Box 270116, 01069 Dresden, Germany. m.ruemmeli@ifw-dresden.de.

ABSTRACT
The initial development of carbon nanotube synthesis revolved heavily around the use of 3d valence transition metals such as Fe, Ni, and Co. More recently, noble metals (e.g. Au) and poor metals (e.g. In, Pb) have been shown to also yield carbon nanotubes. In addition, various ceramics and semiconductors can serve as catalytic particles suitable for tube formation and in some cases hybrid metal/metal oxide systems are possible. All-carbon systems for carbon nanotube growth without any catalytic particles have also been demonstrated. These different growth systems are briefly examined in this article and serve to highlight the breadth of avenues available for carbon nanotube synthesis.

No MeSH data available.


Energy filtered TEM images of carbon nanotubes produced from phenylboronic acid in a MgO matrix. The images show a carbon outer shell and a core (nanowire) comprised B, O and Mg. Top image-zero loss image. The C, B, O and MgO energy filtered TEM images are presented in false colour. Reprinted with kind permission from Bachmatiuk et al. [34].
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Figure 4: Energy filtered TEM images of carbon nanotubes produced from phenylboronic acid in a MgO matrix. The images show a carbon outer shell and a core (nanowire) comprised B, O and Mg. Top image-zero loss image. The C, B, O and MgO energy filtered TEM images are presented in false colour. Reprinted with kind permission from Bachmatiuk et al. [34].

Mentions: Numerous investigators have shown oxides are well suited for CNT growth. An early example was the use of MgO as the catalysts for SWNT formation via the laser evaporation route [11]. More recently, Liu et al. [31] showed Al2O3 nanoparticles could be used to grow SWNT using an alcohol CVD route. Steiner et al. [32] showed both multi- and single-walled carbon nanotubes could be grown from zirconia. The use of magnesium borates can yield B-doped CNT (Figure 4) as was first demonstrated by Bystrzejewski et al. [33,34].


Synthesis of carbon nanotubes with and without catalyst particles.

Rümmeli MH, Bachmatiuk A, Börrnert F, Schäffel F, Ibrahim I, Cendrowski K, Simha-Martynkova G, Plachá D, Borowiak-Palen E, Cuniberti G, Büchner B - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Energy filtered TEM images of carbon nanotubes produced from phenylboronic acid in a MgO matrix. The images show a carbon outer shell and a core (nanowire) comprised B, O and Mg. Top image-zero loss image. The C, B, O and MgO energy filtered TEM images are presented in false colour. Reprinted with kind permission from Bachmatiuk et al. [34].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211370&req=5

Figure 4: Energy filtered TEM images of carbon nanotubes produced from phenylboronic acid in a MgO matrix. The images show a carbon outer shell and a core (nanowire) comprised B, O and Mg. Top image-zero loss image. The C, B, O and MgO energy filtered TEM images are presented in false colour. Reprinted with kind permission from Bachmatiuk et al. [34].
Mentions: Numerous investigators have shown oxides are well suited for CNT growth. An early example was the use of MgO as the catalysts for SWNT formation via the laser evaporation route [11]. More recently, Liu et al. [31] showed Al2O3 nanoparticles could be used to grow SWNT using an alcohol CVD route. Steiner et al. [32] showed both multi- and single-walled carbon nanotubes could be grown from zirconia. The use of magnesium borates can yield B-doped CNT (Figure 4) as was first demonstrated by Bystrzejewski et al. [33,34].

Bottom Line: More recently, noble metals (e.g. Au) and poor metals (e.g. In, Pb) have been shown to also yield carbon nanotubes.All-carbon systems for carbon nanotube growth without any catalytic particles have also been demonstrated.These different growth systems are briefly examined in this article and serve to highlight the breadth of avenues available for carbon nanotube synthesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: IFW Dresden, P,O, Box 270116, 01069 Dresden, Germany. m.ruemmeli@ifw-dresden.de.

ABSTRACT
The initial development of carbon nanotube synthesis revolved heavily around the use of 3d valence transition metals such as Fe, Ni, and Co. More recently, noble metals (e.g. Au) and poor metals (e.g. In, Pb) have been shown to also yield carbon nanotubes. In addition, various ceramics and semiconductors can serve as catalytic particles suitable for tube formation and in some cases hybrid metal/metal oxide systems are possible. All-carbon systems for carbon nanotube growth without any catalytic particles have also been demonstrated. These different growth systems are briefly examined in this article and serve to highlight the breadth of avenues available for carbon nanotube synthesis.

No MeSH data available.