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Synthesis of carbon nanotubes with and without catalyst particles.

Rümmeli MH, Bachmatiuk A, Börrnert F, Schäffel F, Ibrahim I, Cendrowski K, Simha-Martynkova G, Plachá D, Borowiak-Palen E, Cuniberti G, Büchner B - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: More recently, noble metals (e.g. Au) and poor metals (e.g. In, Pb) have been shown to also yield carbon nanotubes.All-carbon systems for carbon nanotube growth without any catalytic particles have also been demonstrated.These different growth systems are briefly examined in this article and serve to highlight the breadth of avenues available for carbon nanotube synthesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: IFW Dresden, P,O, Box 270116, 01069 Dresden, Germany. m.ruemmeli@ifw-dresden.de.

ABSTRACT
The initial development of carbon nanotube synthesis revolved heavily around the use of 3d valence transition metals such as Fe, Ni, and Co. More recently, noble metals (e.g. Au) and poor metals (e.g. In, Pb) have been shown to also yield carbon nanotubes. In addition, various ceramics and semiconductors can serve as catalytic particles suitable for tube formation and in some cases hybrid metal/metal oxide systems are possible. All-carbon systems for carbon nanotube growth without any catalytic particles have also been demonstrated. These different growth systems are briefly examined in this article and serve to highlight the breadth of avenues available for carbon nanotube synthesis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Transmission electron micrograph of the interface between the graphite constructing a carbon nanotube and β-SiC on the surface of (111) β-SiC. Lower panel: Schematic of the orientation relationship between one [111] SiC plane, on which carbon nanotubes are standing perpendicularly, and the other [111] SiC planes. Reprinted with permission from Kusunoki et al. [18].
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Figure 3: Transmission electron micrograph of the interface between the graphite constructing a carbon nanotube and β-SiC on the surface of (111) β-SiC. Lower panel: Schematic of the orientation relationship between one [111] SiC plane, on which carbon nanotubes are standing perpendicularly, and the other [111] SiC planes. Reprinted with permission from Kusunoki et al. [18].

Mentions: Of the non-metallic catalysts for CNT, SiC is the most widely used and historically one of the first to be exploited. The early investigations involved the high temperature annealing (>1500°C) of SiC and was first demonstrated by Kusunoki et al. [18]. An example of the CNT is provided in Figure 3. Kusunoki and co-workers showed that in low vacuum conditions the SiC decomposes through the following oxidation route:(1)


Synthesis of carbon nanotubes with and without catalyst particles.

Rümmeli MH, Bachmatiuk A, Börrnert F, Schäffel F, Ibrahim I, Cendrowski K, Simha-Martynkova G, Plachá D, Borowiak-Palen E, Cuniberti G, Büchner B - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Transmission electron micrograph of the interface between the graphite constructing a carbon nanotube and β-SiC on the surface of (111) β-SiC. Lower panel: Schematic of the orientation relationship between one [111] SiC plane, on which carbon nanotubes are standing perpendicularly, and the other [111] SiC planes. Reprinted with permission from Kusunoki et al. [18].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211370&req=5

Figure 3: Transmission electron micrograph of the interface between the graphite constructing a carbon nanotube and β-SiC on the surface of (111) β-SiC. Lower panel: Schematic of the orientation relationship between one [111] SiC plane, on which carbon nanotubes are standing perpendicularly, and the other [111] SiC planes. Reprinted with permission from Kusunoki et al. [18].
Mentions: Of the non-metallic catalysts for CNT, SiC is the most widely used and historically one of the first to be exploited. The early investigations involved the high temperature annealing (>1500°C) of SiC and was first demonstrated by Kusunoki et al. [18]. An example of the CNT is provided in Figure 3. Kusunoki and co-workers showed that in low vacuum conditions the SiC decomposes through the following oxidation route:(1)

Bottom Line: More recently, noble metals (e.g. Au) and poor metals (e.g. In, Pb) have been shown to also yield carbon nanotubes.All-carbon systems for carbon nanotube growth without any catalytic particles have also been demonstrated.These different growth systems are briefly examined in this article and serve to highlight the breadth of avenues available for carbon nanotube synthesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: IFW Dresden, P,O, Box 270116, 01069 Dresden, Germany. m.ruemmeli@ifw-dresden.de.

ABSTRACT
The initial development of carbon nanotube synthesis revolved heavily around the use of 3d valence transition metals such as Fe, Ni, and Co. More recently, noble metals (e.g. Au) and poor metals (e.g. In, Pb) have been shown to also yield carbon nanotubes. In addition, various ceramics and semiconductors can serve as catalytic particles suitable for tube formation and in some cases hybrid metal/metal oxide systems are possible. All-carbon systems for carbon nanotube growth without any catalytic particles have also been demonstrated. These different growth systems are briefly examined in this article and serve to highlight the breadth of avenues available for carbon nanotube synthesis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus