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Shock-induced breaking of the nanowire with the dependence of crystallographic orientation and strain rate.

Wang F, Gao Y, Zhu T, Zhao J - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: The failure of the metallic nanowire has raised concerns due to its applied reliability in nanoelectromechanical system.The statistical breaking position distributions of the nanowires have been investigated to give the effects of strain rate and crystallographic orientation on micro-atomic fluctuation in the symmetric stretching of the nanowires.However, when the strain rate is larger than 3.54% ps-1, the anisotropy is not obvious because of strong symmetric shocks.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Sciences, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210008, P, R, China. zhaojw@nju.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
The failure of the metallic nanowire has raised concerns due to its applied reliability in nanoelectromechanical system. In this article, the breaking failure is studied for the [100], [110], and [111] single-crystal copper nanowires at different strain rates. The statistical breaking position distributions of the nanowires have been investigated to give the effects of strain rate and crystallographic orientation on micro-atomic fluctuation in the symmetric stretching of the nanowires. When the strain rate is less than 0.26% ps-1, macro-breaking position distributions exhibit the anisotropy of micro-atomic fluctuation. However, when the strain rate is larger than 3.54% ps-1, the anisotropy is not obvious because of strong symmetric shocks.

No MeSH data available.


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The breaking position distribution of the single-crystal copper nanowire. (a) Models of the breaking position distribution (I), (II), and (III) of the [100] nanowire at three representative strain rates, and schematic illustration of the corresponding deformation mechanism of the [100] copper nanowire, (b) the breaking position distributions of the [100] nanowires at all the simulated strain rates from 0.01 to 7.69% ps-1, (c) The breaking position distributions of the [110] nanowires at all the simulated strain rates from 0.01 to 6.16% ps-1, (d) The breaking position distributions of the [111] nanowires at all the simulated strain rates from 0.01 to 6.16% ps-1.
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Figure 4: The breaking position distribution of the single-crystal copper nanowire. (a) Models of the breaking position distribution (I), (II), and (III) of the [100] nanowire at three representative strain rates, and schematic illustration of the corresponding deformation mechanism of the [100] copper nanowire, (b) the breaking position distributions of the [100] nanowires at all the simulated strain rates from 0.01 to 7.69% ps-1, (c) The breaking position distributions of the [110] nanowires at all the simulated strain rates from 0.01 to 6.16% ps-1, (d) The breaking position distributions of the [111] nanowires at all the simulated strain rates from 0.01 to 6.16% ps-1.

Mentions: For example, in most cases, the final breaking positions of [100] occur at the central part of the nanowire at low strain rates, and the nanowires are apt to break at the two ends with the strain rate increasing. Using the [100] nanowire, the scheme in Figure 4a shows the relationships between macro-breaking position distribution and deformation mechanism induced by micro-atomic fluctuation. The statistical histograms of the breaking positions are fitted with Gaussian function, and the fitting peaks replace the most probable breaking position (MPBP) of the nanowires [25]. The MPBP is in the middle of the [100] nanowire at the insensitive area of strain rate (I), and the MPBP distributes at the two ends of the [100] nanowire at the sensitive area of strain rate (III), whereas the MPBP is in the middle or two ends of the [100] nanowire at the transition area of the strain rate (II). In detail, Figure 4b shows the MPBP distributions of the [100] nanowires at the strain rates from 0.01 to 7.69% ps-1 (to refer to strain rates in Table 1). The breaking position distributions at three areas correspond to the stretching deformation processes of the nanowires in equilibrium state, quasi-equilibrium state, and non-equilibrium state, respectively. At low strain rates, the slippage along (111) planes dominates the stretching deformation, and atomic fluctuation is in an equilibrium state. Strong shocks at high strain rates result in the superplastic behaviors and local melted structures, which induced atomic fluctuation in non-equilibrium state, whereas the atomic fluctuation in quasi-equilibrium state brings irregular character of the MPBP distribution at the transition area of the strain rate (II). It reflects the microscopic uncertain property of nanoscale materials. Moreover, there is a transition among the equilibrium state, quasi-equilibrium state, and non-equilibrium state, e.g., Figure 〈11〉 in Figure 4b belongs to quasi-equilibrium state of non-equilibrium state.


Shock-induced breaking of the nanowire with the dependence of crystallographic orientation and strain rate.

Wang F, Gao Y, Zhu T, Zhao J - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

The breaking position distribution of the single-crystal copper nanowire. (a) Models of the breaking position distribution (I), (II), and (III) of the [100] nanowire at three representative strain rates, and schematic illustration of the corresponding deformation mechanism of the [100] copper nanowire, (b) the breaking position distributions of the [100] nanowires at all the simulated strain rates from 0.01 to 7.69% ps-1, (c) The breaking position distributions of the [110] nanowires at all the simulated strain rates from 0.01 to 6.16% ps-1, (d) The breaking position distributions of the [111] nanowires at all the simulated strain rates from 0.01 to 6.16% ps-1.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211357&req=5

Figure 4: The breaking position distribution of the single-crystal copper nanowire. (a) Models of the breaking position distribution (I), (II), and (III) of the [100] nanowire at three representative strain rates, and schematic illustration of the corresponding deformation mechanism of the [100] copper nanowire, (b) the breaking position distributions of the [100] nanowires at all the simulated strain rates from 0.01 to 7.69% ps-1, (c) The breaking position distributions of the [110] nanowires at all the simulated strain rates from 0.01 to 6.16% ps-1, (d) The breaking position distributions of the [111] nanowires at all the simulated strain rates from 0.01 to 6.16% ps-1.
Mentions: For example, in most cases, the final breaking positions of [100] occur at the central part of the nanowire at low strain rates, and the nanowires are apt to break at the two ends with the strain rate increasing. Using the [100] nanowire, the scheme in Figure 4a shows the relationships between macro-breaking position distribution and deformation mechanism induced by micro-atomic fluctuation. The statistical histograms of the breaking positions are fitted with Gaussian function, and the fitting peaks replace the most probable breaking position (MPBP) of the nanowires [25]. The MPBP is in the middle of the [100] nanowire at the insensitive area of strain rate (I), and the MPBP distributes at the two ends of the [100] nanowire at the sensitive area of strain rate (III), whereas the MPBP is in the middle or two ends of the [100] nanowire at the transition area of the strain rate (II). In detail, Figure 4b shows the MPBP distributions of the [100] nanowires at the strain rates from 0.01 to 7.69% ps-1 (to refer to strain rates in Table 1). The breaking position distributions at three areas correspond to the stretching deformation processes of the nanowires in equilibrium state, quasi-equilibrium state, and non-equilibrium state, respectively. At low strain rates, the slippage along (111) planes dominates the stretching deformation, and atomic fluctuation is in an equilibrium state. Strong shocks at high strain rates result in the superplastic behaviors and local melted structures, which induced atomic fluctuation in non-equilibrium state, whereas the atomic fluctuation in quasi-equilibrium state brings irregular character of the MPBP distribution at the transition area of the strain rate (II). It reflects the microscopic uncertain property of nanoscale materials. Moreover, there is a transition among the equilibrium state, quasi-equilibrium state, and non-equilibrium state, e.g., Figure 〈11〉 in Figure 4b belongs to quasi-equilibrium state of non-equilibrium state.

Bottom Line: The failure of the metallic nanowire has raised concerns due to its applied reliability in nanoelectromechanical system.The statistical breaking position distributions of the nanowires have been investigated to give the effects of strain rate and crystallographic orientation on micro-atomic fluctuation in the symmetric stretching of the nanowires.However, when the strain rate is larger than 3.54% ps-1, the anisotropy is not obvious because of strong symmetric shocks.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Sciences, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210008, P, R, China. zhaojw@nju.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
The failure of the metallic nanowire has raised concerns due to its applied reliability in nanoelectromechanical system. In this article, the breaking failure is studied for the [100], [110], and [111] single-crystal copper nanowires at different strain rates. The statistical breaking position distributions of the nanowires have been investigated to give the effects of strain rate and crystallographic orientation on micro-atomic fluctuation in the symmetric stretching of the nanowires. When the strain rate is less than 0.26% ps-1, macro-breaking position distributions exhibit the anisotropy of micro-atomic fluctuation. However, when the strain rate is larger than 3.54% ps-1, the anisotropy is not obvious because of strong symmetric shocks.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus