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Shock-induced breaking of the nanowire with the dependence of crystallographic orientation and strain rate.

Wang F, Gao Y, Zhu T, Zhao J - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: The failure of the metallic nanowire has raised concerns due to its applied reliability in nanoelectromechanical system.The statistical breaking position distributions of the nanowires have been investigated to give the effects of strain rate and crystallographic orientation on micro-atomic fluctuation in the symmetric stretching of the nanowires.However, when the strain rate is larger than 3.54% ps-1, the anisotropy is not obvious because of strong symmetric shocks.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Sciences, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210008, P, R, China. zhaojw@nju.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
The failure of the metallic nanowire has raised concerns due to its applied reliability in nanoelectromechanical system. In this article, the breaking failure is studied for the [100], [110], and [111] single-crystal copper nanowires at different strain rates. The statistical breaking position distributions of the nanowires have been investigated to give the effects of strain rate and crystallographic orientation on micro-atomic fluctuation in the symmetric stretching of the nanowires. When the strain rate is less than 0.26% ps-1, macro-breaking position distributions exhibit the anisotropy of micro-atomic fluctuation. However, when the strain rate is larger than 3.54% ps-1, the anisotropy is not obvious because of strong symmetric shocks.

No MeSH data available.


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The mechanical behavior of the single-crystal copper nanowire. (a) The representative stress-strain relationship of the [100] copper nanowire at the strain rates from 0.01 to 7.69% ps-1. (b) The first yield strain of [100], [110], and [111] plotted against strain rates, respectively. (c) The first yield stress of [100], [110], and [111] plotted against strain rates. (d) Young's modulus of [100], [110], and [111] plotted against strain rates.
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Figure 3: The mechanical behavior of the single-crystal copper nanowire. (a) The representative stress-strain relationship of the [100] copper nanowire at the strain rates from 0.01 to 7.69% ps-1. (b) The first yield strain of [100], [110], and [111] plotted against strain rates, respectively. (c) The first yield stress of [100], [110], and [111] plotted against strain rates. (d) Young's modulus of [100], [110], and [111] plotted against strain rates.

Mentions: For the effect of the strain rate on the mechanical property, Figure 3a shows the typical stress-strain responses of the [100] single-crystal copper nanowires at strain rates from 0.01 to 7.69% ps-1 (to refer to strain rates in Table 1). Stress increases linearly with the strain increasing before the first yield point (the critical point between elastic and plastic deformation), which is consistent with elastic law (That is σ1 = Yε1, σ1, and ε1 are the first yield strain and stress, respectively. Y is Young's modulus.). When the stress decreases abruptly after the first yield point, the nanowire undergoes an irreversible deformation which indicates the beginning of plastic deformation. Subsequently, the yield cycle repeats continuously with a decreasing trend, and the yield cycle is over when the nanowires have no ability to maintain their structures and finally break. At low strain rates, the displayed periodic characters of the stress-strain responses imply the presence of the temporary stable state. By contrast, the periodicity at high strain rates is not obvious in the whole yield cycle.


Shock-induced breaking of the nanowire with the dependence of crystallographic orientation and strain rate.

Wang F, Gao Y, Zhu T, Zhao J - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

The mechanical behavior of the single-crystal copper nanowire. (a) The representative stress-strain relationship of the [100] copper nanowire at the strain rates from 0.01 to 7.69% ps-1. (b) The first yield strain of [100], [110], and [111] plotted against strain rates, respectively. (c) The first yield stress of [100], [110], and [111] plotted against strain rates. (d) Young's modulus of [100], [110], and [111] plotted against strain rates.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211357&req=5

Figure 3: The mechanical behavior of the single-crystal copper nanowire. (a) The representative stress-strain relationship of the [100] copper nanowire at the strain rates from 0.01 to 7.69% ps-1. (b) The first yield strain of [100], [110], and [111] plotted against strain rates, respectively. (c) The first yield stress of [100], [110], and [111] plotted against strain rates. (d) Young's modulus of [100], [110], and [111] plotted against strain rates.
Mentions: For the effect of the strain rate on the mechanical property, Figure 3a shows the typical stress-strain responses of the [100] single-crystal copper nanowires at strain rates from 0.01 to 7.69% ps-1 (to refer to strain rates in Table 1). Stress increases linearly with the strain increasing before the first yield point (the critical point between elastic and plastic deformation), which is consistent with elastic law (That is σ1 = Yε1, σ1, and ε1 are the first yield strain and stress, respectively. Y is Young's modulus.). When the stress decreases abruptly after the first yield point, the nanowire undergoes an irreversible deformation which indicates the beginning of plastic deformation. Subsequently, the yield cycle repeats continuously with a decreasing trend, and the yield cycle is over when the nanowires have no ability to maintain their structures and finally break. At low strain rates, the displayed periodic characters of the stress-strain responses imply the presence of the temporary stable state. By contrast, the periodicity at high strain rates is not obvious in the whole yield cycle.

Bottom Line: The failure of the metallic nanowire has raised concerns due to its applied reliability in nanoelectromechanical system.The statistical breaking position distributions of the nanowires have been investigated to give the effects of strain rate and crystallographic orientation on micro-atomic fluctuation in the symmetric stretching of the nanowires.However, when the strain rate is larger than 3.54% ps-1, the anisotropy is not obvious because of strong symmetric shocks.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Sciences, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210008, P, R, China. zhaojw@nju.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
The failure of the metallic nanowire has raised concerns due to its applied reliability in nanoelectromechanical system. In this article, the breaking failure is studied for the [100], [110], and [111] single-crystal copper nanowires at different strain rates. The statistical breaking position distributions of the nanowires have been investigated to give the effects of strain rate and crystallographic orientation on micro-atomic fluctuation in the symmetric stretching of the nanowires. When the strain rate is less than 0.26% ps-1, macro-breaking position distributions exhibit the anisotropy of micro-atomic fluctuation. However, when the strain rate is larger than 3.54% ps-1, the anisotropy is not obvious because of strong symmetric shocks.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus