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Shock-induced breaking of the nanowire with the dependence of crystallographic orientation and strain rate.

Wang F, Gao Y, Zhu T, Zhao J - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: The failure of the metallic nanowire has raised concerns due to its applied reliability in nanoelectromechanical system.The statistical breaking position distributions of the nanowires have been investigated to give the effects of strain rate and crystallographic orientation on micro-atomic fluctuation in the symmetric stretching of the nanowires.However, when the strain rate is larger than 3.54% ps-1, the anisotropy is not obvious because of strong symmetric shocks.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Sciences, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210008, P, R, China. zhaojw@nju.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
The failure of the metallic nanowire has raised concerns due to its applied reliability in nanoelectromechanical system. In this article, the breaking failure is studied for the [100], [110], and [111] single-crystal copper nanowires at different strain rates. The statistical breaking position distributions of the nanowires have been investigated to give the effects of strain rate and crystallographic orientation on micro-atomic fluctuation in the symmetric stretching of the nanowires. When the strain rate is less than 0.26% ps-1, macro-breaking position distributions exhibit the anisotropy of micro-atomic fluctuation. However, when the strain rate is larger than 3.54% ps-1, the anisotropy is not obvious because of strong symmetric shocks.

No MeSH data available.


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The potential energy and corresponding deformation of the [100] single-crystal copper nanowire. (a) The maximum average potential energy per atom of the [100] nanowire plotted against strain rates, (b) the representative snapshots of the [100] copper nanowire.
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Figure 2: The potential energy and corresponding deformation of the [100] single-crystal copper nanowire. (a) The maximum average potential energy per atom of the [100] nanowire plotted against strain rates, (b) the representative snapshots of the [100] copper nanowire.

Mentions: The deformation styles of the [100] single-crystal copper nanowires are mainly slippage, amorphization, and local melted structures at low, middle, and high strain rates, respectively. The dependence of deformation characters at the applied strain rates is related with the micro-atomic fluctuation of crystalline structures. The degree of lattice order could be reflected by the maximum average potential energy per atom, which results from the breaking of metallic bonds in the tensile deformation process. Bond breaking is a direct consequence of atomic fluctuation overcoming the interatomic cohesive energy, which in turn causes the disordered fluctuation of atoms. When the nanowire stretches, the atoms under strong shocks overcome the interatomic cohesive energy to get a disordered amorphous state with the increase of the average potential energy per atom. Figure 2a shows the maximum average potential energy per atom at each strain rate from the statistical results, and the energy increases with the strain rate increasing before the high strain rate of 5.39% ps-1, but it exhibits a decreasing trend after the strain rate of 5.39% ps-1, attributing that symmetric shocks are so strong that the shock wave at such high strain rate (>5.39% ps-1) has some difficulties in propagating from the two ends to the middle of the nanowire. So the nanowire behaves as the local melted structures at the two ends and retains the order lattice within the nanowire. We can also see the corresponding breaking characters at the selected strain rates from the representative snapshots of the [100] single-crystal copper nanowires at the breaking moment in Figure 2b.


Shock-induced breaking of the nanowire with the dependence of crystallographic orientation and strain rate.

Wang F, Gao Y, Zhu T, Zhao J - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

The potential energy and corresponding deformation of the [100] single-crystal copper nanowire. (a) The maximum average potential energy per atom of the [100] nanowire plotted against strain rates, (b) the representative snapshots of the [100] copper nanowire.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211357&req=5

Figure 2: The potential energy and corresponding deformation of the [100] single-crystal copper nanowire. (a) The maximum average potential energy per atom of the [100] nanowire plotted against strain rates, (b) the representative snapshots of the [100] copper nanowire.
Mentions: The deformation styles of the [100] single-crystal copper nanowires are mainly slippage, amorphization, and local melted structures at low, middle, and high strain rates, respectively. The dependence of deformation characters at the applied strain rates is related with the micro-atomic fluctuation of crystalline structures. The degree of lattice order could be reflected by the maximum average potential energy per atom, which results from the breaking of metallic bonds in the tensile deformation process. Bond breaking is a direct consequence of atomic fluctuation overcoming the interatomic cohesive energy, which in turn causes the disordered fluctuation of atoms. When the nanowire stretches, the atoms under strong shocks overcome the interatomic cohesive energy to get a disordered amorphous state with the increase of the average potential energy per atom. Figure 2a shows the maximum average potential energy per atom at each strain rate from the statistical results, and the energy increases with the strain rate increasing before the high strain rate of 5.39% ps-1, but it exhibits a decreasing trend after the strain rate of 5.39% ps-1, attributing that symmetric shocks are so strong that the shock wave at such high strain rate (>5.39% ps-1) has some difficulties in propagating from the two ends to the middle of the nanowire. So the nanowire behaves as the local melted structures at the two ends and retains the order lattice within the nanowire. We can also see the corresponding breaking characters at the selected strain rates from the representative snapshots of the [100] single-crystal copper nanowires at the breaking moment in Figure 2b.

Bottom Line: The failure of the metallic nanowire has raised concerns due to its applied reliability in nanoelectromechanical system.The statistical breaking position distributions of the nanowires have been investigated to give the effects of strain rate and crystallographic orientation on micro-atomic fluctuation in the symmetric stretching of the nanowires.However, when the strain rate is larger than 3.54% ps-1, the anisotropy is not obvious because of strong symmetric shocks.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Sciences, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210008, P, R, China. zhaojw@nju.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
The failure of the metallic nanowire has raised concerns due to its applied reliability in nanoelectromechanical system. In this article, the breaking failure is studied for the [100], [110], and [111] single-crystal copper nanowires at different strain rates. The statistical breaking position distributions of the nanowires have been investigated to give the effects of strain rate and crystallographic orientation on micro-atomic fluctuation in the symmetric stretching of the nanowires. When the strain rate is less than 0.26% ps-1, macro-breaking position distributions exhibit the anisotropy of micro-atomic fluctuation. However, when the strain rate is larger than 3.54% ps-1, the anisotropy is not obvious because of strong symmetric shocks.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus