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Electrorheology of nanofiber suspensions.

Yin J, Zhao X - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: Recent researches of using nanoparticles as the dispersal phase have led to new interest in the development of non-conventional ER fluids with improved performances.In this review, we especially focus on the recent researches on electrorheology of various nanofiber-based suspensions, including inorganic, organic, and inorganic/organic composite nanofibers.Our goal is to highlight the advantages of using anisotropic nanostructured materials as dispersal phases to improve ER performances.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Smart Materials Laboratory, Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710129, China. jbyin@nwpu.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
Electrorheological (ER) fluid, which can be transformed rapidly from a fluid-like state to a solid-like state under an external electric field, is considered to be one of the most important smart fluids. However, conventional ER fluids based on microparticles are subjected to challenges in practical applications due to the lack of versatile performances. Recent researches of using nanoparticles as the dispersal phase have led to new interest in the development of non-conventional ER fluids with improved performances. In this review, we especially focus on the recent researches on electrorheology of various nanofiber-based suspensions, including inorganic, organic, and inorganic/organic composite nanofibers. Our goal is to highlight the advantages of using anisotropic nanostructured materials as dispersal phases to improve ER performances.

No MeSH data available.


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SEM image (a) and TEM image (b) with the SAED pattern in the inset of the calcium and titanium precipitate nanofibers [79].
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Figure 5: SEM image (a) and TEM image (b) with the SAED pattern in the inset of the calcium and titanium precipitate nanofibers [79].

Mentions: A recent study by Cheng et al. [79] investigated the ER effect of a suspension of calcium and titanium precipitate (CTP) nanofibers. The nanofibers, which were prepared via a precipitation route in an ethanol/water mixed solution system containing tetrabutyl titanate, calcium chloride, oxalic acid dehydrate, had width of 23 nm and length of 40 to 130 nm (Figure 5). The nanofibers were claimed to be polycrystalline, but no clear crystal structure was ascertained according to the electron diffraction pattern. The X-ray diffraction pattern showed that the nanofibers were made of a complex mixture containing calcium oxalate dehydrate, TiOC2O4(H2O)2, and TiO(OH)2. The rheological measurements showed that the complex nanofibers showed a large yield stress beyond 110 kPa at 66.6 wt% particle concentration in silicone oil, which was about twice higher as high as that of granular suspensions. From the absorption peaks at 3438 and 1649 cm-1 in Fourier transform infrared spectra, however, it could be judged that the nanofiber suspension belonged to a water-containing system. Therefore, the shortages of water effect on ER properties including thermal and electrical instabilities needed to be further overcome for the CTP nanofiber suspension.


Electrorheology of nanofiber suspensions.

Yin J, Zhao X - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

SEM image (a) and TEM image (b) with the SAED pattern in the inset of the calcium and titanium precipitate nanofibers [79].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211318&req=5

Figure 5: SEM image (a) and TEM image (b) with the SAED pattern in the inset of the calcium and titanium precipitate nanofibers [79].
Mentions: A recent study by Cheng et al. [79] investigated the ER effect of a suspension of calcium and titanium precipitate (CTP) nanofibers. The nanofibers, which were prepared via a precipitation route in an ethanol/water mixed solution system containing tetrabutyl titanate, calcium chloride, oxalic acid dehydrate, had width of 23 nm and length of 40 to 130 nm (Figure 5). The nanofibers were claimed to be polycrystalline, but no clear crystal structure was ascertained according to the electron diffraction pattern. The X-ray diffraction pattern showed that the nanofibers were made of a complex mixture containing calcium oxalate dehydrate, TiOC2O4(H2O)2, and TiO(OH)2. The rheological measurements showed that the complex nanofibers showed a large yield stress beyond 110 kPa at 66.6 wt% particle concentration in silicone oil, which was about twice higher as high as that of granular suspensions. From the absorption peaks at 3438 and 1649 cm-1 in Fourier transform infrared spectra, however, it could be judged that the nanofiber suspension belonged to a water-containing system. Therefore, the shortages of water effect on ER properties including thermal and electrical instabilities needed to be further overcome for the CTP nanofiber suspension.

Bottom Line: Recent researches of using nanoparticles as the dispersal phase have led to new interest in the development of non-conventional ER fluids with improved performances.In this review, we especially focus on the recent researches on electrorheology of various nanofiber-based suspensions, including inorganic, organic, and inorganic/organic composite nanofibers.Our goal is to highlight the advantages of using anisotropic nanostructured materials as dispersal phases to improve ER performances.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Smart Materials Laboratory, Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710129, China. jbyin@nwpu.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
Electrorheological (ER) fluid, which can be transformed rapidly from a fluid-like state to a solid-like state under an external electric field, is considered to be one of the most important smart fluids. However, conventional ER fluids based on microparticles are subjected to challenges in practical applications due to the lack of versatile performances. Recent researches of using nanoparticles as the dispersal phase have led to new interest in the development of non-conventional ER fluids with improved performances. In this review, we especially focus on the recent researches on electrorheology of various nanofiber-based suspensions, including inorganic, organic, and inorganic/organic composite nanofibers. Our goal is to highlight the advantages of using anisotropic nanostructured materials as dispersal phases to improve ER performances.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus