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Effect of particle size on the thermal conductivity of nanofluids containing metallic nanoparticles.

Warrier P, Teja A - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: The model takes into account the decrease in thermal conductivity of metal nanoparticles with decreasing size.Although literature data could be correlated well using the model, the effect of the size of the particles on the effective thermal conductivity of the nanofluid could not be elucidated from these data.The results provide strong evidence that the decrease in the thermal conductivity of the solid with particle size must be considered when developing models for the thermal conductivity of nanofluids.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0100, USA. amyn.teja@chbe.gatech.edu.

ABSTRACT
A one-parameter model is presented for the thermal conductivity of nanofluids containing dispersed metallic nanoparticles. The model takes into account the decrease in thermal conductivity of metal nanoparticles with decreasing size. Although literature data could be correlated well using the model, the effect of the size of the particles on the effective thermal conductivity of the nanofluid could not be elucidated from these data. Therefore, new thermal conductivity measurements are reported for six nanofluids containing silver nanoparticles of different sizes and volume fractions. The results provide strong evidence that the decrease in the thermal conductivity of the solid with particle size must be considered when developing models for the thermal conductivity of nanofluids.

No MeSH data available.


Size dependent thermal conductivity of copper. The solid line represents the thermal conductivity of copper nanoparticles calculated using Equations 3 and 5. The dashed line represents the bulk thermal conductivity of copper at 298 K. Data points are for copper thin films [18]
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Figure 1: Size dependent thermal conductivity of copper. The solid line represents the thermal conductivity of copper nanoparticles calculated using Equations 3 and 5. The dashed line represents the bulk thermal conductivity of copper at 298 K. Data points are for copper thin films [18]

Mentions: Equations 3 and 5 relate the thermal conductivity of metallic nanoparticles to their characteristic size, and is illustrated in Figure 1 for copper nanoparticles. The solid line in Figure 1 was obtained using Equation 3 to calculate the thermal conductivity when Kn > 5, and Eq. 5 when Kn < 1. In the intermediate region (1 <Kn < 5), the thermal conductivity was obtained by interpolation. Although no data are available to validate these calculations, the measurements of Nath and Chopra [18] for the thermal conductivity of thin films of copper (also plotted in Figure 1) clearly show a decrease in the thermal conductivity as the thickness of the film decreases. We expect metallic nanoparticles to exhibit similar trends with size. The dashed line in Figure 1 shows the bulk value of the thermal conductivity of copper, which is significantly higher than the measured values for thin films.


Effect of particle size on the thermal conductivity of nanofluids containing metallic nanoparticles.

Warrier P, Teja A - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Size dependent thermal conductivity of copper. The solid line represents the thermal conductivity of copper nanoparticles calculated using Equations 3 and 5. The dashed line represents the bulk thermal conductivity of copper at 298 K. Data points are for copper thin films [18]
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211308&req=5

Figure 1: Size dependent thermal conductivity of copper. The solid line represents the thermal conductivity of copper nanoparticles calculated using Equations 3 and 5. The dashed line represents the bulk thermal conductivity of copper at 298 K. Data points are for copper thin films [18]
Mentions: Equations 3 and 5 relate the thermal conductivity of metallic nanoparticles to their characteristic size, and is illustrated in Figure 1 for copper nanoparticles. The solid line in Figure 1 was obtained using Equation 3 to calculate the thermal conductivity when Kn > 5, and Eq. 5 when Kn < 1. In the intermediate region (1 <Kn < 5), the thermal conductivity was obtained by interpolation. Although no data are available to validate these calculations, the measurements of Nath and Chopra [18] for the thermal conductivity of thin films of copper (also plotted in Figure 1) clearly show a decrease in the thermal conductivity as the thickness of the film decreases. We expect metallic nanoparticles to exhibit similar trends with size. The dashed line in Figure 1 shows the bulk value of the thermal conductivity of copper, which is significantly higher than the measured values for thin films.

Bottom Line: The model takes into account the decrease in thermal conductivity of metal nanoparticles with decreasing size.Although literature data could be correlated well using the model, the effect of the size of the particles on the effective thermal conductivity of the nanofluid could not be elucidated from these data.The results provide strong evidence that the decrease in the thermal conductivity of the solid with particle size must be considered when developing models for the thermal conductivity of nanofluids.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0100, USA. amyn.teja@chbe.gatech.edu.

ABSTRACT
A one-parameter model is presented for the thermal conductivity of nanofluids containing dispersed metallic nanoparticles. The model takes into account the decrease in thermal conductivity of metal nanoparticles with decreasing size. Although literature data could be correlated well using the model, the effect of the size of the particles on the effective thermal conductivity of the nanofluid could not be elucidated from these data. Therefore, new thermal conductivity measurements are reported for six nanofluids containing silver nanoparticles of different sizes and volume fractions. The results provide strong evidence that the decrease in the thermal conductivity of the solid with particle size must be considered when developing models for the thermal conductivity of nanofluids.

No MeSH data available.