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Optimal synthesis and characterization of Ag nanofluids by electrical explosion of wires in liquids.

Ju Park E, Won Lee S, Bang IC, Park HW - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: In this study, we optimized the fabrication method and examined the effects of manufacturing process parameters.The average Ag nanoparticle size in water was 118.9 nm and the zeta potential was -42.5 mV.The critical heat flux of the 0.001-vol.% Ag nanofluid was higher than pure water.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Mechanical and Advanced Materials Engineering, UNIST 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan Metropolitan City 689-798, Republic of Korea. hwpark@unist.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT
Silver nanoparticles were produced by electrical explosion of wires in liquids with no additive. In this study, we optimized the fabrication method and examined the effects of manufacturing process parameters. Morphology and size of the Ag nanoparticles were determined using transmission electron microscopy and field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Size and zeta potential were analyzed using dynamic light scattering. A response optimization technique showed that optimal conditions were achieved when capacitance was 30 μF, wire length was 38 mm, liquid volume was 500 mL, and the liquid type was deionized water. The average Ag nanoparticle size in water was 118.9 nm and the zeta potential was -42.5 mV. The critical heat flux of the 0.001-vol.% Ag nanofluid was higher than pure water.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic diagram of the experimental system for the EEWL process.
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Figure 1: Schematic diagram of the experimental system for the EEWL process.

Mentions: A schematic illustration of the experimental system is shown in Figure 1. The system consists of a container for liquid media for the explosion process and a simple discharge circuit, which includes a high-voltage power supply, a capacitor, and a spark-gap switch. A metal wire (conductor) was placed in the container filled with the liquids. The capacitor was charged using an applied voltage. The amount of stored energy in the capacitor was W = 0.5CV2, where C is the capacitance and V is the charged voltage. By closing the switch, the current was allowed to flow through the wire. The current deposited the electrical energy in the wire due to its finite resistance. Thus, the wire located between the two electrodes melted, vaporized, and turned into plasma. Finally, nanoparticles were formed by interaction with the liquid. The vaporized particles were condensed more efficiently in the liquid than in ambient air. The basic principle of the method is illustrated in Figure 2.


Optimal synthesis and characterization of Ag nanofluids by electrical explosion of wires in liquids.

Ju Park E, Won Lee S, Bang IC, Park HW - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Schematic diagram of the experimental system for the EEWL process.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211281&req=5

Figure 1: Schematic diagram of the experimental system for the EEWL process.
Mentions: A schematic illustration of the experimental system is shown in Figure 1. The system consists of a container for liquid media for the explosion process and a simple discharge circuit, which includes a high-voltage power supply, a capacitor, and a spark-gap switch. A metal wire (conductor) was placed in the container filled with the liquids. The capacitor was charged using an applied voltage. The amount of stored energy in the capacitor was W = 0.5CV2, where C is the capacitance and V is the charged voltage. By closing the switch, the current was allowed to flow through the wire. The current deposited the electrical energy in the wire due to its finite resistance. Thus, the wire located between the two electrodes melted, vaporized, and turned into plasma. Finally, nanoparticles were formed by interaction with the liquid. The vaporized particles were condensed more efficiently in the liquid than in ambient air. The basic principle of the method is illustrated in Figure 2.

Bottom Line: In this study, we optimized the fabrication method and examined the effects of manufacturing process parameters.The average Ag nanoparticle size in water was 118.9 nm and the zeta potential was -42.5 mV.The critical heat flux of the 0.001-vol.% Ag nanofluid was higher than pure water.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Mechanical and Advanced Materials Engineering, UNIST 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan Metropolitan City 689-798, Republic of Korea. hwpark@unist.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT
Silver nanoparticles were produced by electrical explosion of wires in liquids with no additive. In this study, we optimized the fabrication method and examined the effects of manufacturing process parameters. Morphology and size of the Ag nanoparticles were determined using transmission electron microscopy and field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Size and zeta potential were analyzed using dynamic light scattering. A response optimization technique showed that optimal conditions were achieved when capacitance was 30 μF, wire length was 38 mm, liquid volume was 500 mL, and the liquid type was deionized water. The average Ag nanoparticle size in water was 118.9 nm and the zeta potential was -42.5 mV. The critical heat flux of the 0.001-vol.% Ag nanofluid was higher than pure water.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus