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Light-emitting diodes enhanced by localized surface plasmon resonance.

Gu X, Qiu T, Zhang W, Chu PK - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: The mechanism is based on the energy coupling effect between the emitted photons from the semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles fabricated by nanotechnology.In this review, we describe the mechanism of this coupling effect and summarize the common fabrication techniques.The prospect, including the potential to replace fluorescent/incandescent lighting devices as well as applications to flat panel displays and optoelectronics, and future challenges with regard to the design of metallic nanostructures and fabrication techniques are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, People's Republic of China. tqiu@seu.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
Light-emitting diodes [LEDs] are of particular interest recently as their performance is approaching fluorescent/incandescent tubes. Moreover, their energy-saving property is attracting many researchers because of the huge energy crisis we are facing. Among all methods intending to enhance the efficiency and intensity of a conventional LED, localized surface plasmon resonance is a promising way. The mechanism is based on the energy coupling effect between the emitted photons from the semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles fabricated by nanotechnology. In this review, we describe the mechanism of this coupling effect and summarize the common fabrication techniques. The prospect, including the potential to replace fluorescent/incandescent lighting devices as well as applications to flat panel displays and optoelectronics, and future challenges with regard to the design of metallic nanostructures and fabrication techniques are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Illustration of the NSL process. Shown are the deposition of polystyrene spheres on the substrate, thermal evaporation of gold, and removal of polystyrene spheres leaving triangular gold NPs. Reproduced from [52]. Copyright The Royal Society of Chemistry, 2006.
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Figure 8: Illustration of the NSL process. Shown are the deposition of polystyrene spheres on the substrate, thermal evaporation of gold, and removal of polystyrene spheres leaving triangular gold NPs. Reproduced from [52]. Copyright The Royal Society of Chemistry, 2006.

Mentions: Traditional NSL, as illustrated in Figure 8, involves dropping a suspension of nanospheres onto a substrate, self-assembly into a hexagonally closely packed two-dimensional colloidal crystal that serves as a deposition mask, vacuum/electron beam deposition, and finally, removal of the nanosphere mask by ultrasonic treatment in an organic solution [55-57]. Different from EBL, the patterning is based on self-assembly rather than electron beam irradiation. Hence, the production cost is reduced because only a small amount of nanosphere solution is needed. In addition, the use of copper instead of Au, Ag, and Pt without degrading the NP properties can lead to further low production cost [58]. Other NSL-based techniques, for example, double-layer mask-based and angle-resolved NSL, allow more flexible tuning of the metallic NP optical response [59,60] and, consequently, enhancement in light emission. NSL has been utilized to fabricate metallic NPs to increase PL from Si nanocrystals and GaN light emitters [61,62]. However, on account of inherent restrictions such as difficulty to fabricate structures other than triangles or quasi-triangles, this method has not been extended to produce LEDs.


Light-emitting diodes enhanced by localized surface plasmon resonance.

Gu X, Qiu T, Zhang W, Chu PK - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Illustration of the NSL process. Shown are the deposition of polystyrene spheres on the substrate, thermal evaporation of gold, and removal of polystyrene spheres leaving triangular gold NPs. Reproduced from [52]. Copyright The Royal Society of Chemistry, 2006.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211255&req=5

Figure 8: Illustration of the NSL process. Shown are the deposition of polystyrene spheres on the substrate, thermal evaporation of gold, and removal of polystyrene spheres leaving triangular gold NPs. Reproduced from [52]. Copyright The Royal Society of Chemistry, 2006.
Mentions: Traditional NSL, as illustrated in Figure 8, involves dropping a suspension of nanospheres onto a substrate, self-assembly into a hexagonally closely packed two-dimensional colloidal crystal that serves as a deposition mask, vacuum/electron beam deposition, and finally, removal of the nanosphere mask by ultrasonic treatment in an organic solution [55-57]. Different from EBL, the patterning is based on self-assembly rather than electron beam irradiation. Hence, the production cost is reduced because only a small amount of nanosphere solution is needed. In addition, the use of copper instead of Au, Ag, and Pt without degrading the NP properties can lead to further low production cost [58]. Other NSL-based techniques, for example, double-layer mask-based and angle-resolved NSL, allow more flexible tuning of the metallic NP optical response [59,60] and, consequently, enhancement in light emission. NSL has been utilized to fabricate metallic NPs to increase PL from Si nanocrystals and GaN light emitters [61,62]. However, on account of inherent restrictions such as difficulty to fabricate structures other than triangles or quasi-triangles, this method has not been extended to produce LEDs.

Bottom Line: The mechanism is based on the energy coupling effect between the emitted photons from the semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles fabricated by nanotechnology.In this review, we describe the mechanism of this coupling effect and summarize the common fabrication techniques.The prospect, including the potential to replace fluorescent/incandescent lighting devices as well as applications to flat panel displays and optoelectronics, and future challenges with regard to the design of metallic nanostructures and fabrication techniques are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, People's Republic of China. tqiu@seu.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
Light-emitting diodes [LEDs] are of particular interest recently as their performance is approaching fluorescent/incandescent tubes. Moreover, their energy-saving property is attracting many researchers because of the huge energy crisis we are facing. Among all methods intending to enhance the efficiency and intensity of a conventional LED, localized surface plasmon resonance is a promising way. The mechanism is based on the energy coupling effect between the emitted photons from the semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles fabricated by nanotechnology. In this review, we describe the mechanism of this coupling effect and summarize the common fabrication techniques. The prospect, including the potential to replace fluorescent/incandescent lighting devices as well as applications to flat panel displays and optoelectronics, and future challenges with regard to the design of metallic nanostructures and fabrication techniques are discussed.

No MeSH data available.