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Light-emitting diodes enhanced by localized surface plasmon resonance.

Gu X, Qiu T, Zhang W, Chu PK - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: The mechanism is based on the energy coupling effect between the emitted photons from the semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles fabricated by nanotechnology.In this review, we describe the mechanism of this coupling effect and summarize the common fabrication techniques.The prospect, including the potential to replace fluorescent/incandescent lighting devices as well as applications to flat panel displays and optoelectronics, and future challenges with regard to the design of metallic nanostructures and fabrication techniques are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, People's Republic of China. tqiu@seu.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
Light-emitting diodes [LEDs] are of particular interest recently as their performance is approaching fluorescent/incandescent tubes. Moreover, their energy-saving property is attracting many researchers because of the huge energy crisis we are facing. Among all methods intending to enhance the efficiency and intensity of a conventional LED, localized surface plasmon resonance is a promising way. The mechanism is based on the energy coupling effect between the emitted photons from the semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles fabricated by nanotechnology. In this review, we describe the mechanism of this coupling effect and summarize the common fabrication techniques. The prospect, including the potential to replace fluorescent/incandescent lighting devices as well as applications to flat panel displays and optoelectronics, and future challenges with regard to the design of metallic nanostructures and fabrication techniques are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


AFM images of Ag NPs deposited on an n-GaN layer before and after annealing. (a) Before annealing and (b) after annealing. After deposition, the particle size is significantly enlarged for better enhancement. AFM, atomic force microscopy. Reproduced from [33]. Copyright WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, 2008.
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Figure 5: AFM images of Ag NPs deposited on an n-GaN layer before and after annealing. (a) Before annealing and (b) after annealing. After deposition, the particle size is significantly enlarged for better enhancement. AFM, atomic force microscopy. Reproduced from [33]. Copyright WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, 2008.

Mentions: Owing to the ease of implementation and reasonable cost, vacuum deposition together with PTP is the most common method in fabricating LEDs containing metallic NPs. Figure 5 shows a typical image of Ag NPs deposited on an n-GaN layer before and after annealing [33]. Similar to the results described in [43], after annealing at 750°C for 10 min in a metal/organic chemical vapor deposition chamber, the size and height of the NPs change from 275 ± 50 and 8 ± 4 nm to 450 ± 50 and 15 ± 5 nm, respectively. Afterwards, a 20-nm-thick undoped GaN, 22-nm-thick InGaN/GaN MQW, and a 0.2-μm p-type GaN layer are deposited onto the Ag NPs and two electrodes are added to the LED structure. The output optical power is observed to increase by 32.2% at an input current of 100 mA due to the enhancement of IQE resulting from coupling between the MQW and Ag NPs. In addition, InGaN/GaN MQW LEDs with different structures [36,37,47] and Si-based LEDs [48] have been produced by the sputtering-annealing process.


Light-emitting diodes enhanced by localized surface plasmon resonance.

Gu X, Qiu T, Zhang W, Chu PK - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

AFM images of Ag NPs deposited on an n-GaN layer before and after annealing. (a) Before annealing and (b) after annealing. After deposition, the particle size is significantly enlarged for better enhancement. AFM, atomic force microscopy. Reproduced from [33]. Copyright WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, 2008.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211255&req=5

Figure 5: AFM images of Ag NPs deposited on an n-GaN layer before and after annealing. (a) Before annealing and (b) after annealing. After deposition, the particle size is significantly enlarged for better enhancement. AFM, atomic force microscopy. Reproduced from [33]. Copyright WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, 2008.
Mentions: Owing to the ease of implementation and reasonable cost, vacuum deposition together with PTP is the most common method in fabricating LEDs containing metallic NPs. Figure 5 shows a typical image of Ag NPs deposited on an n-GaN layer before and after annealing [33]. Similar to the results described in [43], after annealing at 750°C for 10 min in a metal/organic chemical vapor deposition chamber, the size and height of the NPs change from 275 ± 50 and 8 ± 4 nm to 450 ± 50 and 15 ± 5 nm, respectively. Afterwards, a 20-nm-thick undoped GaN, 22-nm-thick InGaN/GaN MQW, and a 0.2-μm p-type GaN layer are deposited onto the Ag NPs and two electrodes are added to the LED structure. The output optical power is observed to increase by 32.2% at an input current of 100 mA due to the enhancement of IQE resulting from coupling between the MQW and Ag NPs. In addition, InGaN/GaN MQW LEDs with different structures [36,37,47] and Si-based LEDs [48] have been produced by the sputtering-annealing process.

Bottom Line: The mechanism is based on the energy coupling effect between the emitted photons from the semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles fabricated by nanotechnology.In this review, we describe the mechanism of this coupling effect and summarize the common fabrication techniques.The prospect, including the potential to replace fluorescent/incandescent lighting devices as well as applications to flat panel displays and optoelectronics, and future challenges with regard to the design of metallic nanostructures and fabrication techniques are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, People's Republic of China. tqiu@seu.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
Light-emitting diodes [LEDs] are of particular interest recently as their performance is approaching fluorescent/incandescent tubes. Moreover, their energy-saving property is attracting many researchers because of the huge energy crisis we are facing. Among all methods intending to enhance the efficiency and intensity of a conventional LED, localized surface plasmon resonance is a promising way. The mechanism is based on the energy coupling effect between the emitted photons from the semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles fabricated by nanotechnology. In this review, we describe the mechanism of this coupling effect and summarize the common fabrication techniques. The prospect, including the potential to replace fluorescent/incandescent lighting devices as well as applications to flat panel displays and optoelectronics, and future challenges with regard to the design of metallic nanostructures and fabrication techniques are discussed.

No MeSH data available.