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Light-emitting diodes enhanced by localized surface plasmon resonance.

Gu X, Qiu T, Zhang W, Chu PK - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: The mechanism is based on the energy coupling effect between the emitted photons from the semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles fabricated by nanotechnology.In this review, we describe the mechanism of this coupling effect and summarize the common fabrication techniques.The prospect, including the potential to replace fluorescent/incandescent lighting devices as well as applications to flat panel displays and optoelectronics, and future challenges with regard to the design of metallic nanostructures and fabrication techniques are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, People's Republic of China. tqiu@seu.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
Light-emitting diodes [LEDs] are of particular interest recently as their performance is approaching fluorescent/incandescent tubes. Moreover, their energy-saving property is attracting many researchers because of the huge energy crisis we are facing. Among all methods intending to enhance the efficiency and intensity of a conventional LED, localized surface plasmon resonance is a promising way. The mechanism is based on the energy coupling effect between the emitted photons from the semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles fabricated by nanotechnology. In this review, we describe the mechanism of this coupling effect and summarize the common fabrication techniques. The prospect, including the potential to replace fluorescent/incandescent lighting devices as well as applications to flat panel displays and optoelectronics, and future challenges with regard to the design of metallic nanostructures and fabrication techniques are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Use of NPs to enhance the IQE of LEDs. (a) Two-dimensional ordered array of metal NPs placed in the vicinity of the QW active region of a LED. (b) Enhancement due to isolated Ag spheres on InGaN/GaN QW emitters with a separation of 10 nm as a function of the sphere radius a for different original radiative efficiencies. (c) Enhancement due to two-dimensional array of Ag spheres on InGaN/GaN QW emitters with a separation of 10 nm as a function of the sphere radius a for different original radiative efficiencies. Also shown is the optimized sphere spacing Ropt for ηrad = 0.001. Reproduced from [35]. Copyright American Institute of Physics, 2008.
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Figure 3: Use of NPs to enhance the IQE of LEDs. (a) Two-dimensional ordered array of metal NPs placed in the vicinity of the QW active region of a LED. (b) Enhancement due to isolated Ag spheres on InGaN/GaN QW emitters with a separation of 10 nm as a function of the sphere radius a for different original radiative efficiencies. (c) Enhancement due to two-dimensional array of Ag spheres on InGaN/GaN QW emitters with a separation of 10 nm as a function of the sphere radius a for different original radiative efficiencies. Also shown is the optimized sphere spacing Ropt for ηrad = 0.001. Reproduced from [35]. Copyright American Institute of Physics, 2008.

Mentions: A model proposed by Khurgin et al. [35] further confirms the importance of the higher local field and demonstrates that the IQE can indeed be enhanced by LSPR via the electric field/emitter interaction. However, the use of NPs to enhance the IQE of LEDs is effective only when the original IQE is very low (<1%) and the NPs are highly disordered, as shown in Figure 3. The results are corroborated by experiments. For example, Yeh et al. [36] have studied two InGaN/GaN QW-based LEDs emitting different colors and discovered that the green one, which has a lower original IQE corresponding to a lower crystal quality, exhibits a more effective enhancement than the blue one. Besides, due to indirect band-gap emission, Si has a relatively low original IQE and can possibly gain the most from LSP, which will be discussed in "Applications" section.


Light-emitting diodes enhanced by localized surface plasmon resonance.

Gu X, Qiu T, Zhang W, Chu PK - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Use of NPs to enhance the IQE of LEDs. (a) Two-dimensional ordered array of metal NPs placed in the vicinity of the QW active region of a LED. (b) Enhancement due to isolated Ag spheres on InGaN/GaN QW emitters with a separation of 10 nm as a function of the sphere radius a for different original radiative efficiencies. (c) Enhancement due to two-dimensional array of Ag spheres on InGaN/GaN QW emitters with a separation of 10 nm as a function of the sphere radius a for different original radiative efficiencies. Also shown is the optimized sphere spacing Ropt for ηrad = 0.001. Reproduced from [35]. Copyright American Institute of Physics, 2008.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211255&req=5

Figure 3: Use of NPs to enhance the IQE of LEDs. (a) Two-dimensional ordered array of metal NPs placed in the vicinity of the QW active region of a LED. (b) Enhancement due to isolated Ag spheres on InGaN/GaN QW emitters with a separation of 10 nm as a function of the sphere radius a for different original radiative efficiencies. (c) Enhancement due to two-dimensional array of Ag spheres on InGaN/GaN QW emitters with a separation of 10 nm as a function of the sphere radius a for different original radiative efficiencies. Also shown is the optimized sphere spacing Ropt for ηrad = 0.001. Reproduced from [35]. Copyright American Institute of Physics, 2008.
Mentions: A model proposed by Khurgin et al. [35] further confirms the importance of the higher local field and demonstrates that the IQE can indeed be enhanced by LSPR via the electric field/emitter interaction. However, the use of NPs to enhance the IQE of LEDs is effective only when the original IQE is very low (<1%) and the NPs are highly disordered, as shown in Figure 3. The results are corroborated by experiments. For example, Yeh et al. [36] have studied two InGaN/GaN QW-based LEDs emitting different colors and discovered that the green one, which has a lower original IQE corresponding to a lower crystal quality, exhibits a more effective enhancement than the blue one. Besides, due to indirect band-gap emission, Si has a relatively low original IQE and can possibly gain the most from LSP, which will be discussed in "Applications" section.

Bottom Line: The mechanism is based on the energy coupling effect between the emitted photons from the semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles fabricated by nanotechnology.In this review, we describe the mechanism of this coupling effect and summarize the common fabrication techniques.The prospect, including the potential to replace fluorescent/incandescent lighting devices as well as applications to flat panel displays and optoelectronics, and future challenges with regard to the design of metallic nanostructures and fabrication techniques are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, People's Republic of China. tqiu@seu.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
Light-emitting diodes [LEDs] are of particular interest recently as their performance is approaching fluorescent/incandescent tubes. Moreover, their energy-saving property is attracting many researchers because of the huge energy crisis we are facing. Among all methods intending to enhance the efficiency and intensity of a conventional LED, localized surface plasmon resonance is a promising way. The mechanism is based on the energy coupling effect between the emitted photons from the semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles fabricated by nanotechnology. In this review, we describe the mechanism of this coupling effect and summarize the common fabrication techniques. The prospect, including the potential to replace fluorescent/incandescent lighting devices as well as applications to flat panel displays and optoelectronics, and future challenges with regard to the design of metallic nanostructures and fabrication techniques are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus