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Light-emitting diodes enhanced by localized surface plasmon resonance.

Gu X, Qiu T, Zhang W, Chu PK - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: The mechanism is based on the energy coupling effect between the emitted photons from the semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles fabricated by nanotechnology.In this review, we describe the mechanism of this coupling effect and summarize the common fabrication techniques.The prospect, including the potential to replace fluorescent/incandescent lighting devices as well as applications to flat panel displays and optoelectronics, and future challenges with regard to the design of metallic nanostructures and fabrication techniques are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, People's Republic of China. tqiu@seu.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
Light-emitting diodes [LEDs] are of particular interest recently as their performance is approaching fluorescent/incandescent tubes. Moreover, their energy-saving property is attracting many researchers because of the huge energy crisis we are facing. Among all methods intending to enhance the efficiency and intensity of a conventional LED, localized surface plasmon resonance is a promising way. The mechanism is based on the energy coupling effect between the emitted photons from the semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles fabricated by nanotechnology. In this review, we describe the mechanism of this coupling effect and summarize the common fabrication techniques. The prospect, including the potential to replace fluorescent/incandescent lighting devices as well as applications to flat panel displays and optoelectronics, and future challenges with regard to the design of metallic nanostructures and fabrication techniques are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Image of an organic display panel developed by Philips Electronics. Reproduced from [75]. Copyright Nature Publishing Group, 2004.
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Figure 10: Image of an organic display panel developed by Philips Electronics. Reproduced from [75]. Copyright Nature Publishing Group, 2004.

Mentions: Commercial flat panel displays are typically liquid crystal [LCD] and plasma displays [PD]. Although these two schemes dominate the market today, many problems still remain unsolved, for instance, narrow viewing angle in spite of big improvement since its inception, poor resistance to shock associated with LCDs, complexity in small-area fabrication and UV radiation inherent to PDs. Consequently, scientists continue to search for other display schemes and devices. LED is a viable alternative due to the high intensity and energy saving. Unlike LCDs, commercial LED displays usually adopt organic emitting materials, and an image of which is shown in Figure 10[75]. OLEDs have attracted considerable attention due to advantages such as flexibility, good intensity, and large area. Both indoor (televisions) and outdoor LED displays have been introduced to the market, and LSPR can be used to enhance the efficiency of these LEDs (mainly LEE). Meanwhile, the ability of performing light extraction from LEDs enables LSPR to be an effective top emitter (emission from the metal side instead of the substrate). In addition, utilization of LSPR obviates the need for carefully designed surface structures, thus reducing both the fabrication complexity and cost. Although a commercial display with LSPR-enhanced light extraction has not yet been made, there have been encouraging experimental results concerning the efficiency, color composition, and top emission capability, which are instrumental to the practical application of LSPR-enhanced LEDs.


Light-emitting diodes enhanced by localized surface plasmon resonance.

Gu X, Qiu T, Zhang W, Chu PK - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Image of an organic display panel developed by Philips Electronics. Reproduced from [75]. Copyright Nature Publishing Group, 2004.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211255&req=5

Figure 10: Image of an organic display panel developed by Philips Electronics. Reproduced from [75]. Copyright Nature Publishing Group, 2004.
Mentions: Commercial flat panel displays are typically liquid crystal [LCD] and plasma displays [PD]. Although these two schemes dominate the market today, many problems still remain unsolved, for instance, narrow viewing angle in spite of big improvement since its inception, poor resistance to shock associated with LCDs, complexity in small-area fabrication and UV radiation inherent to PDs. Consequently, scientists continue to search for other display schemes and devices. LED is a viable alternative due to the high intensity and energy saving. Unlike LCDs, commercial LED displays usually adopt organic emitting materials, and an image of which is shown in Figure 10[75]. OLEDs have attracted considerable attention due to advantages such as flexibility, good intensity, and large area. Both indoor (televisions) and outdoor LED displays have been introduced to the market, and LSPR can be used to enhance the efficiency of these LEDs (mainly LEE). Meanwhile, the ability of performing light extraction from LEDs enables LSPR to be an effective top emitter (emission from the metal side instead of the substrate). In addition, utilization of LSPR obviates the need for carefully designed surface structures, thus reducing both the fabrication complexity and cost. Although a commercial display with LSPR-enhanced light extraction has not yet been made, there have been encouraging experimental results concerning the efficiency, color composition, and top emission capability, which are instrumental to the practical application of LSPR-enhanced LEDs.

Bottom Line: The mechanism is based on the energy coupling effect between the emitted photons from the semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles fabricated by nanotechnology.In this review, we describe the mechanism of this coupling effect and summarize the common fabrication techniques.The prospect, including the potential to replace fluorescent/incandescent lighting devices as well as applications to flat panel displays and optoelectronics, and future challenges with regard to the design of metallic nanostructures and fabrication techniques are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, People's Republic of China. tqiu@seu.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
Light-emitting diodes [LEDs] are of particular interest recently as their performance is approaching fluorescent/incandescent tubes. Moreover, their energy-saving property is attracting many researchers because of the huge energy crisis we are facing. Among all methods intending to enhance the efficiency and intensity of a conventional LED, localized surface plasmon resonance is a promising way. The mechanism is based on the energy coupling effect between the emitted photons from the semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles fabricated by nanotechnology. In this review, we describe the mechanism of this coupling effect and summarize the common fabrication techniques. The prospect, including the potential to replace fluorescent/incandescent lighting devices as well as applications to flat panel displays and optoelectronics, and future challenges with regard to the design of metallic nanostructures and fabrication techniques are discussed.

No MeSH data available.