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Light-emitting diodes enhanced by localized surface plasmon resonance.

Gu X, Qiu T, Zhang W, Chu PK - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: The mechanism is based on the energy coupling effect between the emitted photons from the semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles fabricated by nanotechnology.In this review, we describe the mechanism of this coupling effect and summarize the common fabrication techniques.The prospect, including the potential to replace fluorescent/incandescent lighting devices as well as applications to flat panel displays and optoelectronics, and future challenges with regard to the design of metallic nanostructures and fabrication techniques are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, People's Republic of China. tqiu@seu.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
Light-emitting diodes [LEDs] are of particular interest recently as their performance is approaching fluorescent/incandescent tubes. Moreover, their energy-saving property is attracting many researchers because of the huge energy crisis we are facing. Among all methods intending to enhance the efficiency and intensity of a conventional LED, localized surface plasmon resonance is a promising way. The mechanism is based on the energy coupling effect between the emitted photons from the semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles fabricated by nanotechnology. In this review, we describe the mechanism of this coupling effect and summarize the common fabrication techniques. The prospect, including the potential to replace fluorescent/incandescent lighting devices as well as applications to flat panel displays and optoelectronics, and future challenges with regard to the design of metallic nanostructures and fabrication techniques are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Enhanced emission efficiency, Purcell factor, and PL spectrum of the sample. These are shown as red dashed line, blue solid line, and black dotted line, respectively. Nearly 100% emission efficiency can be obtained at around 440 nm; however, this does not perfectly match the emission peak. Reproduced from [18]. Copyright Nature Publishing Group, 2004.
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Figure 1: Enhanced emission efficiency, Purcell factor, and PL spectrum of the sample. These are shown as red dashed line, blue solid line, and black dotted line, respectively. Nearly 100% emission efficiency can be obtained at around 440 nm; however, this does not perfectly match the emission peak. Reproduced from [18]. Copyright Nature Publishing Group, 2004.

Mentions: where ηint represents the original IQE. Figure 1 shows the wavelength-dependent η*int, Purcell factor, and the emission spectrum of their sample. It is clear that greater enhancement can be obtained at shorter wavelengths (~440 nm). However, this wavelength does not perfectly overlap the GaN/InGaN emission peak, leaving space for better enhancement. In fact, the SPP resonant energy must be in the vicinity of the emission energy in order to achieve the best enhancement. This rule has since been verified by other experiments [20-23]. Hence, only a small subset of LEDs can be enhanced via SPP/emitter coupling because the SPP resonant frequency of a metal film cannot be easily tuned. Another challenge is that the metal film is typically opaque, thereby making light extraction from the metal side of the device difficult. It has been shown that light can be effectively extracted from the metal side by exploiting the surface plasmon cross-coupling effect, but incorporation of the appropriately scaled nanostructures is necessary [24,25].


Light-emitting diodes enhanced by localized surface plasmon resonance.

Gu X, Qiu T, Zhang W, Chu PK - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Enhanced emission efficiency, Purcell factor, and PL spectrum of the sample. These are shown as red dashed line, blue solid line, and black dotted line, respectively. Nearly 100% emission efficiency can be obtained at around 440 nm; however, this does not perfectly match the emission peak. Reproduced from [18]. Copyright Nature Publishing Group, 2004.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211255&req=5

Figure 1: Enhanced emission efficiency, Purcell factor, and PL spectrum of the sample. These are shown as red dashed line, blue solid line, and black dotted line, respectively. Nearly 100% emission efficiency can be obtained at around 440 nm; however, this does not perfectly match the emission peak. Reproduced from [18]. Copyright Nature Publishing Group, 2004.
Mentions: where ηint represents the original IQE. Figure 1 shows the wavelength-dependent η*int, Purcell factor, and the emission spectrum of their sample. It is clear that greater enhancement can be obtained at shorter wavelengths (~440 nm). However, this wavelength does not perfectly overlap the GaN/InGaN emission peak, leaving space for better enhancement. In fact, the SPP resonant energy must be in the vicinity of the emission energy in order to achieve the best enhancement. This rule has since been verified by other experiments [20-23]. Hence, only a small subset of LEDs can be enhanced via SPP/emitter coupling because the SPP resonant frequency of a metal film cannot be easily tuned. Another challenge is that the metal film is typically opaque, thereby making light extraction from the metal side of the device difficult. It has been shown that light can be effectively extracted from the metal side by exploiting the surface plasmon cross-coupling effect, but incorporation of the appropriately scaled nanostructures is necessary [24,25].

Bottom Line: The mechanism is based on the energy coupling effect between the emitted photons from the semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles fabricated by nanotechnology.In this review, we describe the mechanism of this coupling effect and summarize the common fabrication techniques.The prospect, including the potential to replace fluorescent/incandescent lighting devices as well as applications to flat panel displays and optoelectronics, and future challenges with regard to the design of metallic nanostructures and fabrication techniques are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, People's Republic of China. tqiu@seu.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
Light-emitting diodes [LEDs] are of particular interest recently as their performance is approaching fluorescent/incandescent tubes. Moreover, their energy-saving property is attracting many researchers because of the huge energy crisis we are facing. Among all methods intending to enhance the efficiency and intensity of a conventional LED, localized surface plasmon resonance is a promising way. The mechanism is based on the energy coupling effect between the emitted photons from the semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles fabricated by nanotechnology. In this review, we describe the mechanism of this coupling effect and summarize the common fabrication techniques. The prospect, including the potential to replace fluorescent/incandescent lighting devices as well as applications to flat panel displays and optoelectronics, and future challenges with regard to the design of metallic nanostructures and fabrication techniques are discussed.

No MeSH data available.