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Atomic characterization of Si nanoclusters embedded in SiO2 by atom probe tomography.

Roussel M, Talbot E, Gourbilleau F, Pareige P - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: Such a technique and its analysis give information on the structure at the atomic level and allow obtaining complementary information with respect to other techniques.An atomic scale description of the Si nanoclusters/SiO2 ML will be fully described.This system is composed of 3.8-nm-thick SiO layers and 4-nm-thick SiO2 layers annealed 1 h at 900°C.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, Université et INSA de Rouen, UMR CNRS 6634, Av, de l'université, BP 12, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray, France. manuel.roussel@etu.univ-rouen.fr.

ABSTRACT
Silicon nanoclusters are of prime interest for new generation of optoelectronic and microelectronics components. Physical properties (light emission, carrier storage...) of systems using such nanoclusters are strongly dependent on nanostructural characteristics. These characteristics (size, composition, distribution, and interface nature) are until now obtained using conventional high-resolution analytic methods, such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, EFTEM, or EELS. In this article, a complementary technique, the atom probe tomography, was used for studying a multilayer (ML) system containing silicon clusters. Such a technique and its analysis give information on the structure at the atomic level and allow obtaining complementary information with respect to other techniques. A description of the different steps for such analysis: sample preparation, atom probe analysis, and data treatment are detailed. An atomic scale description of the Si nanoclusters/SiO2 ML will be fully described. This system is composed of 3.8-nm-thick SiO layers and 4-nm-thick SiO2 layers annealed 1 h at 900°C.

No MeSH data available.


3D reconstruction of SRSO/SiO2 MLs of APT analysis. a. Distribution of silicon atoms in the analyzed volume. Each red dot corresponds to a silicon atom. Arrows indicate the location of SRSO layers. b. Oxygen atoms. Arrows indicate the location of SiO2 layers. c. Analyzed volume after cluster identification algorithm. Each red volume corresponds to silicon rich volumes (more than 75% of silicon) and green volumes correspond to silica composition (33% of silicon).
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Figure 3: 3D reconstruction of SRSO/SiO2 MLs of APT analysis. a. Distribution of silicon atoms in the analyzed volume. Each red dot corresponds to a silicon atom. Arrows indicate the location of SRSO layers. b. Oxygen atoms. Arrows indicate the location of SiO2 layers. c. Analyzed volume after cluster identification algorithm. Each red volume corresponds to silicon rich volumes (more than 75% of silicon) and green volumes correspond to silica composition (33% of silicon).

Mentions: Figure 3 shows a 3D reconstruction of the same material analyzed by LA-WATAP. In Figure 3a,b, which represents the chemical map of Si and O atoms, each red dot corresponds to a silicon atom and each green dot corresponds to an oxygen one. The SRSO/SiO2 stacking sequence is clearly visible. In order to identify all the Si-nc (crystalline and amorphous), a cluster identification algorithm has been used. In this method, a sphere (1-nm radius) is placed over each atom of the volume, and the local composition is estimated by counting atoms within this sphere. The 3D reconstruction atoms, where the local concentration is above a given threshold (75 at.% in this case), permits revealing clearly Si-rich regions. A threshold of 33 at.% of Si can be used to evidence SiO2 regions. Figure 3c illustrates the result of this data treatment. Red volumes correspond to Si-nc and green ones to SiO2 matrix. Once this treatment is achieved, it is possible to estimate compositions of phases and interface, size distribution of Si-nc, and particle density in the analyzed volume.


Atomic characterization of Si nanoclusters embedded in SiO2 by atom probe tomography.

Roussel M, Talbot E, Gourbilleau F, Pareige P - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

3D reconstruction of SRSO/SiO2 MLs of APT analysis. a. Distribution of silicon atoms in the analyzed volume. Each red dot corresponds to a silicon atom. Arrows indicate the location of SRSO layers. b. Oxygen atoms. Arrows indicate the location of SiO2 layers. c. Analyzed volume after cluster identification algorithm. Each red volume corresponds to silicon rich volumes (more than 75% of silicon) and green volumes correspond to silica composition (33% of silicon).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211216&req=5

Figure 3: 3D reconstruction of SRSO/SiO2 MLs of APT analysis. a. Distribution of silicon atoms in the analyzed volume. Each red dot corresponds to a silicon atom. Arrows indicate the location of SRSO layers. b. Oxygen atoms. Arrows indicate the location of SiO2 layers. c. Analyzed volume after cluster identification algorithm. Each red volume corresponds to silicon rich volumes (more than 75% of silicon) and green volumes correspond to silica composition (33% of silicon).
Mentions: Figure 3 shows a 3D reconstruction of the same material analyzed by LA-WATAP. In Figure 3a,b, which represents the chemical map of Si and O atoms, each red dot corresponds to a silicon atom and each green dot corresponds to an oxygen one. The SRSO/SiO2 stacking sequence is clearly visible. In order to identify all the Si-nc (crystalline and amorphous), a cluster identification algorithm has been used. In this method, a sphere (1-nm radius) is placed over each atom of the volume, and the local composition is estimated by counting atoms within this sphere. The 3D reconstruction atoms, where the local concentration is above a given threshold (75 at.% in this case), permits revealing clearly Si-rich regions. A threshold of 33 at.% of Si can be used to evidence SiO2 regions. Figure 3c illustrates the result of this data treatment. Red volumes correspond to Si-nc and green ones to SiO2 matrix. Once this treatment is achieved, it is possible to estimate compositions of phases and interface, size distribution of Si-nc, and particle density in the analyzed volume.

Bottom Line: Such a technique and its analysis give information on the structure at the atomic level and allow obtaining complementary information with respect to other techniques.An atomic scale description of the Si nanoclusters/SiO2 ML will be fully described.This system is composed of 3.8-nm-thick SiO layers and 4-nm-thick SiO2 layers annealed 1 h at 900°C.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, Université et INSA de Rouen, UMR CNRS 6634, Av, de l'université, BP 12, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray, France. manuel.roussel@etu.univ-rouen.fr.

ABSTRACT
Silicon nanoclusters are of prime interest for new generation of optoelectronic and microelectronics components. Physical properties (light emission, carrier storage...) of systems using such nanoclusters are strongly dependent on nanostructural characteristics. These characteristics (size, composition, distribution, and interface nature) are until now obtained using conventional high-resolution analytic methods, such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, EFTEM, or EELS. In this article, a complementary technique, the atom probe tomography, was used for studying a multilayer (ML) system containing silicon clusters. Such a technique and its analysis give information on the structure at the atomic level and allow obtaining complementary information with respect to other techniques. A description of the different steps for such analysis: sample preparation, atom probe analysis, and data treatment are detailed. An atomic scale description of the Si nanoclusters/SiO2 ML will be fully described. This system is composed of 3.8-nm-thick SiO layers and 4-nm-thick SiO2 layers annealed 1 h at 900°C.

No MeSH data available.