Limits...
Confined conversion of CuS nanowires to CuO nanotubes by annealing-induced diffusion in nanochannels.

Mu C, He J - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: Copper oxide (CuO) nanotubes were successfully converted from CuS nanowires embedded in anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template by annealing-induced diffusion in a confined tube-type space.The spreading of CuO and formation of CuO layer on the nanochannel surface of AAO, and the confinement offered by AAO nanochannels play a key role in the formation of CuO nanotubes.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Functional Nanomaterials Laboratory and Key Laboratory of Photochemical Conversion and Optoelectronic Materials, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhongguancun Beiyitiao 2, Haidianqu, Beijing 100190, China. jhhe@mail.ipc.ac.cn.

ABSTRACT
Copper oxide (CuO) nanotubes were successfully converted from CuS nanowires embedded in anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template by annealing-induced diffusion in a confined tube-type space. The spreading of CuO and formation of CuO layer on the nanochannel surface of AAO, and the confinement offered by AAO nanochannels play a key role in the formation of CuO nanotubes.

No MeSH data available.


TEM images of a single CuS nanowire. (a) and CuO nanotube (c) with a diameter of 50 nm. The insets in (a, c) are the electron diffraction patterns of the CuS nanowire and CuO nanotube. HRTEM images of CuS nanowire (b), and CuO nanotube (d).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211201&req=5

Figure 3: TEM images of a single CuS nanowire. (a) and CuO nanotube (c) with a diameter of 50 nm. The insets in (a, c) are the electron diffraction patterns of the CuS nanowire and CuO nanotube. HRTEM images of CuS nanowire (b), and CuO nanotube (d).

Mentions: The morphology of the CuO nanotubes was further confirmed by TEM observations. Figure 3a is a typical TEM image of the CuS nanowire, indicating that the nanowire possesses a smooth surface and a uniform diameter of ca. 50 nm that is again in good agreement with that of the AAO pore. The inset of Figure 3a shows the SAED spots of CuS nanowire, and could be well assigned to the hexagonal crystal system, in agreement with the above XRD results. The clear distribution of spots indicates the single crystal nature of the CuS nanowire. The HRTEM image of CuS nanowire (Figure 3b) with clearly visible lattice fringes also provides the evidence of single-crystal nature. A typical TEM image of the CuO nanotube is shown in Figure 3c. The inner/outer surfaces of the CuO nanotube were not quite smooth as compared to the CuS nanowire, and its diameter was estimated to be ca. 55 nm, which is larger than that of the CuS nanowire. The SAED analysis on the CuO nanotube gave a clear electron diffraction pattern (the inset of Figure 3c) composed of several rings. At least three diffraction rings could be identified, with average d spacings of 2.53 and 2.52 Å associated with the 002 and -111 reflections, 2.32 and 2.31 Å associated with the 111 and 200 reflections, and 1.87 Å associated with the -202 reflection. The SAED results, in accordance with the XRD data, demonstrate that the CuO nanotube is polycrystalline of the monoclinic phase, and has lost the preferred orientation. The HRTEM image of CuO nanotube shown in Figure 3d further identifies a polycrystalline structure.


Confined conversion of CuS nanowires to CuO nanotubes by annealing-induced diffusion in nanochannels.

Mu C, He J - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

TEM images of a single CuS nanowire. (a) and CuO nanotube (c) with a diameter of 50 nm. The insets in (a, c) are the electron diffraction patterns of the CuS nanowire and CuO nanotube. HRTEM images of CuS nanowire (b), and CuO nanotube (d).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211201&req=5

Figure 3: TEM images of a single CuS nanowire. (a) and CuO nanotube (c) with a diameter of 50 nm. The insets in (a, c) are the electron diffraction patterns of the CuS nanowire and CuO nanotube. HRTEM images of CuS nanowire (b), and CuO nanotube (d).
Mentions: The morphology of the CuO nanotubes was further confirmed by TEM observations. Figure 3a is a typical TEM image of the CuS nanowire, indicating that the nanowire possesses a smooth surface and a uniform diameter of ca. 50 nm that is again in good agreement with that of the AAO pore. The inset of Figure 3a shows the SAED spots of CuS nanowire, and could be well assigned to the hexagonal crystal system, in agreement with the above XRD results. The clear distribution of spots indicates the single crystal nature of the CuS nanowire. The HRTEM image of CuS nanowire (Figure 3b) with clearly visible lattice fringes also provides the evidence of single-crystal nature. A typical TEM image of the CuO nanotube is shown in Figure 3c. The inner/outer surfaces of the CuO nanotube were not quite smooth as compared to the CuS nanowire, and its diameter was estimated to be ca. 55 nm, which is larger than that of the CuS nanowire. The SAED analysis on the CuO nanotube gave a clear electron diffraction pattern (the inset of Figure 3c) composed of several rings. At least three diffraction rings could be identified, with average d spacings of 2.53 and 2.52 Å associated with the 002 and -111 reflections, 2.32 and 2.31 Å associated with the 111 and 200 reflections, and 1.87 Å associated with the -202 reflection. The SAED results, in accordance with the XRD data, demonstrate that the CuO nanotube is polycrystalline of the monoclinic phase, and has lost the preferred orientation. The HRTEM image of CuO nanotube shown in Figure 3d further identifies a polycrystalline structure.

Bottom Line: Copper oxide (CuO) nanotubes were successfully converted from CuS nanowires embedded in anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template by annealing-induced diffusion in a confined tube-type space.The spreading of CuO and formation of CuO layer on the nanochannel surface of AAO, and the confinement offered by AAO nanochannels play a key role in the formation of CuO nanotubes.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Functional Nanomaterials Laboratory and Key Laboratory of Photochemical Conversion and Optoelectronic Materials, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhongguancun Beiyitiao 2, Haidianqu, Beijing 100190, China. jhhe@mail.ipc.ac.cn.

ABSTRACT
Copper oxide (CuO) nanotubes were successfully converted from CuS nanowires embedded in anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template by annealing-induced diffusion in a confined tube-type space. The spreading of CuO and formation of CuO layer on the nanochannel surface of AAO, and the confinement offered by AAO nanochannels play a key role in the formation of CuO nanotubes.

No MeSH data available.