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Guided assembly of nanoparticles on electrostatically charged nanocrystalline diamond thin films.

Verveniotis E, Kromka A, Ledinský M, Cermák J, Rezek B - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: We apply atomic force microscope for local electrostatic charging of oxygen-terminated nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films deposited on silicon, to induce electrostatically driven self-assembly of colloidal alumina nanoparticles into micro-patterns.We demonstrate that electrostatic potential contrast on the NCD films varies between 0.1 and 1.2 V and that the contrast of more than ±1 V (as detected by Kelvin force microscopy) is able to induce self-assembly of the nanoparticles via coulombic and polarization forces.This opens prospects for applications of diamond and its unique set of properties in self-assembly of nano-devices and nano-systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Physics ASCR, Cukrovarnicka 10, 16253, Prague 6, Czech Republic. verven@fzu.cz.

ABSTRACT
We apply atomic force microscope for local electrostatic charging of oxygen-terminated nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films deposited on silicon, to induce electrostatically driven self-assembly of colloidal alumina nanoparticles into micro-patterns. Considering possible capacitive, sp2 phase and spatial uniformity factors to charging, we employ films with sub-100 nm thickness and about 60% relative sp2 phase content, probe the spatial material uniformity by Raman and electron microscopy, and repeat experiments at various positions. We demonstrate that electrostatic potential contrast on the NCD films varies between 0.1 and 1.2 V and that the contrast of more than ±1 V (as detected by Kelvin force microscopy) is able to induce self-assembly of the nanoparticles via coulombic and polarization forces. This opens prospects for applications of diamond and its unique set of properties in self-assembly of nano-devices and nano-systems.

No MeSH data available.


Surface potential shifts after electrostatic charging for positive and negative polarity. The data points correspond to average potential within the individual stripes that were charged using (a) ±20 V or (b) ±25 V. Positive and negative data points at the same x-value were obtained from a charging experiment and KFM in one scan frame. Only in the case of x = 4 in (b) the patterns were charged in separate frames. The x-axis values between two integer values in (a) correspond to experiments conducted within the same day.
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Figure 4: Surface potential shifts after electrostatic charging for positive and negative polarity. The data points correspond to average potential within the individual stripes that were charged using (a) ±20 V or (b) ±25 V. Positive and negative data points at the same x-value were obtained from a charging experiment and KFM in one scan frame. Only in the case of x = 4 in (b) the patterns were charged in separate frames. The x-axis values between two integer values in (a) correspond to experiments conducted within the same day.

Mentions: The maximum achievable potential shift in each polarity was varying when the experiment was repeated (inherently at another position on the sample). This is illustrated in Figure 4a,b, where we can see the total potential contrast varying from 230 to 2000 mV. The data points in Figure 4 correspond to average potential within the individual stripes that were charged using ±20 V (Figure 4a) or ±25 V (Figure 4b). The x-axis values between two integer values in Figure 4a correspond to experiments conducted within the same day. Positive and negative data points at the same x-value were obtained from a charging experiment and KFM in one scan frame such as the ones in Figure 3. Only in the case of x = 4 in Figure 4b the patterns were charged in separate frames (shown in Figure 5c,d). On the graphs we can also observe that charging with ±25 V does not always result in higher potential. Even though we did obtain the highest contrast to date with this voltage (x = 4, Figure 4b), there are features charged with ±20 V that exhibit higher potential than others charged with ±25 V (e.g., x = 2-3 in Figure 4a vs. x = 2, 3 in Figure 4b).


Guided assembly of nanoparticles on electrostatically charged nanocrystalline diamond thin films.

Verveniotis E, Kromka A, Ledinský M, Cermák J, Rezek B - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Surface potential shifts after electrostatic charging for positive and negative polarity. The data points correspond to average potential within the individual stripes that were charged using (a) ±20 V or (b) ±25 V. Positive and negative data points at the same x-value were obtained from a charging experiment and KFM in one scan frame. Only in the case of x = 4 in (b) the patterns were charged in separate frames. The x-axis values between two integer values in (a) correspond to experiments conducted within the same day.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211194&req=5

Figure 4: Surface potential shifts after electrostatic charging for positive and negative polarity. The data points correspond to average potential within the individual stripes that were charged using (a) ±20 V or (b) ±25 V. Positive and negative data points at the same x-value were obtained from a charging experiment and KFM in one scan frame. Only in the case of x = 4 in (b) the patterns were charged in separate frames. The x-axis values between two integer values in (a) correspond to experiments conducted within the same day.
Mentions: The maximum achievable potential shift in each polarity was varying when the experiment was repeated (inherently at another position on the sample). This is illustrated in Figure 4a,b, where we can see the total potential contrast varying from 230 to 2000 mV. The data points in Figure 4 correspond to average potential within the individual stripes that were charged using ±20 V (Figure 4a) or ±25 V (Figure 4b). The x-axis values between two integer values in Figure 4a correspond to experiments conducted within the same day. Positive and negative data points at the same x-value were obtained from a charging experiment and KFM in one scan frame such as the ones in Figure 3. Only in the case of x = 4 in Figure 4b the patterns were charged in separate frames (shown in Figure 5c,d). On the graphs we can also observe that charging with ±25 V does not always result in higher potential. Even though we did obtain the highest contrast to date with this voltage (x = 4, Figure 4b), there are features charged with ±20 V that exhibit higher potential than others charged with ±25 V (e.g., x = 2-3 in Figure 4a vs. x = 2, 3 in Figure 4b).

Bottom Line: We apply atomic force microscope for local electrostatic charging of oxygen-terminated nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films deposited on silicon, to induce electrostatically driven self-assembly of colloidal alumina nanoparticles into micro-patterns.We demonstrate that electrostatic potential contrast on the NCD films varies between 0.1 and 1.2 V and that the contrast of more than ±1 V (as detected by Kelvin force microscopy) is able to induce self-assembly of the nanoparticles via coulombic and polarization forces.This opens prospects for applications of diamond and its unique set of properties in self-assembly of nano-devices and nano-systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Physics ASCR, Cukrovarnicka 10, 16253, Prague 6, Czech Republic. verven@fzu.cz.

ABSTRACT
We apply atomic force microscope for local electrostatic charging of oxygen-terminated nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films deposited on silicon, to induce electrostatically driven self-assembly of colloidal alumina nanoparticles into micro-patterns. Considering possible capacitive, sp2 phase and spatial uniformity factors to charging, we employ films with sub-100 nm thickness and about 60% relative sp2 phase content, probe the spatial material uniformity by Raman and electron microscopy, and repeat experiments at various positions. We demonstrate that electrostatic potential contrast on the NCD films varies between 0.1 and 1.2 V and that the contrast of more than ±1 V (as detected by Kelvin force microscopy) is able to induce self-assembly of the nanoparticles via coulombic and polarization forces. This opens prospects for applications of diamond and its unique set of properties in self-assembly of nano-devices and nano-systems.

No MeSH data available.