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Guided assembly of nanoparticles on electrostatically charged nanocrystalline diamond thin films.

Verveniotis E, Kromka A, Ledinský M, Cermák J, Rezek B - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: We apply atomic force microscope for local electrostatic charging of oxygen-terminated nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films deposited on silicon, to induce electrostatically driven self-assembly of colloidal alumina nanoparticles into micro-patterns.We demonstrate that electrostatic potential contrast on the NCD films varies between 0.1 and 1.2 V and that the contrast of more than ±1 V (as detected by Kelvin force microscopy) is able to induce self-assembly of the nanoparticles via coulombic and polarization forces.This opens prospects for applications of diamond and its unique set of properties in self-assembly of nano-devices and nano-systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Physics ASCR, Cukrovarnicka 10, 16253, Prague 6, Czech Republic. verven@fzu.cz.

ABSTRACT
We apply atomic force microscope for local electrostatic charging of oxygen-terminated nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films deposited on silicon, to induce electrostatically driven self-assembly of colloidal alumina nanoparticles into micro-patterns. Considering possible capacitive, sp2 phase and spatial uniformity factors to charging, we employ films with sub-100 nm thickness and about 60% relative sp2 phase content, probe the spatial material uniformity by Raman and electron microscopy, and repeat experiments at various positions. We demonstrate that electrostatic potential contrast on the NCD films varies between 0.1 and 1.2 V and that the contrast of more than ±1 V (as detected by Kelvin force microscopy) is able to induce self-assembly of the nanoparticles via coulombic and polarization forces. This opens prospects for applications of diamond and its unique set of properties in self-assembly of nano-devices and nano-systems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Kelvin force microscopy surface potential maps after typical charging experiments. (a) up to ±20 V and (b) at ±25 V. Charging voltages are indicated near each stripe pattern.
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Figure 3: Kelvin force microscopy surface potential maps after typical charging experiments. (a) up to ±20 V and (b) at ±25 V. Charging voltages are indicated near each stripe pattern.

Mentions: Figure 3 shows KFM surface potential maps after the typical charging experiments. In Figure 3a we applied the charging voltage of 10, 20, -10, -20 V in an 8 μm2 area during contact mode AFM scan, while scanning horizontally and with slow scan direction from the bottom to the top. The maximum potential values with respect to the background for the charging voltages of ±20 V are 210 mV for the positive and -390 mV for the negative polarity. Figure 3b shows the KFM map after charging with ±25 V in another 2 μm2 area. Those voltages are at or above the saturation threshold of charging [20]. Yet the maximum potential values are only 110 mV for the positive and -140 mV for the negative polarity.


Guided assembly of nanoparticles on electrostatically charged nanocrystalline diamond thin films.

Verveniotis E, Kromka A, Ledinský M, Cermák J, Rezek B - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Kelvin force microscopy surface potential maps after typical charging experiments. (a) up to ±20 V and (b) at ±25 V. Charging voltages are indicated near each stripe pattern.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211194&req=5

Figure 3: Kelvin force microscopy surface potential maps after typical charging experiments. (a) up to ±20 V and (b) at ±25 V. Charging voltages are indicated near each stripe pattern.
Mentions: Figure 3 shows KFM surface potential maps after the typical charging experiments. In Figure 3a we applied the charging voltage of 10, 20, -10, -20 V in an 8 μm2 area during contact mode AFM scan, while scanning horizontally and with slow scan direction from the bottom to the top. The maximum potential values with respect to the background for the charging voltages of ±20 V are 210 mV for the positive and -390 mV for the negative polarity. Figure 3b shows the KFM map after charging with ±25 V in another 2 μm2 area. Those voltages are at or above the saturation threshold of charging [20]. Yet the maximum potential values are only 110 mV for the positive and -140 mV for the negative polarity.

Bottom Line: We apply atomic force microscope for local electrostatic charging of oxygen-terminated nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films deposited on silicon, to induce electrostatically driven self-assembly of colloidal alumina nanoparticles into micro-patterns.We demonstrate that electrostatic potential contrast on the NCD films varies between 0.1 and 1.2 V and that the contrast of more than ±1 V (as detected by Kelvin force microscopy) is able to induce self-assembly of the nanoparticles via coulombic and polarization forces.This opens prospects for applications of diamond and its unique set of properties in self-assembly of nano-devices and nano-systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Physics ASCR, Cukrovarnicka 10, 16253, Prague 6, Czech Republic. verven@fzu.cz.

ABSTRACT
We apply atomic force microscope for local electrostatic charging of oxygen-terminated nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films deposited on silicon, to induce electrostatically driven self-assembly of colloidal alumina nanoparticles into micro-patterns. Considering possible capacitive, sp2 phase and spatial uniformity factors to charging, we employ films with sub-100 nm thickness and about 60% relative sp2 phase content, probe the spatial material uniformity by Raman and electron microscopy, and repeat experiments at various positions. We demonstrate that electrostatic potential contrast on the NCD films varies between 0.1 and 1.2 V and that the contrast of more than ±1 V (as detected by Kelvin force microscopy) is able to induce self-assembly of the nanoparticles via coulombic and polarization forces. This opens prospects for applications of diamond and its unique set of properties in self-assembly of nano-devices and nano-systems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus