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Carbon nanotubes: are they dispersed or dissolved in liquids?

Geckeler KE, Premkumar T - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) constitute a novel class of nanomaterials with remarkable applications in diverse domains.However, the main intrincsic problem of CNTs is their insolubility or very poor solubility in most of the common solvents.In this article, we address this fundamental issue to give basic insight specifically to the researchers who are working with CNTs as well asgenerally to scientists who deal with nano-related research domains.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics, World-Class University (WCU), 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712, South Korea. gistprof@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) constitute a novel class of nanomaterials with remarkable applications in diverse domains. However, the main intrincsic problem of CNTs is their insolubility or very poor solubility in most of the common solvents. The basic key question here is: are carbon nanotubes dissolved or dispersed in liquids, specifically in water? When analyzing the scientific research articles published in various leading journals, we found that many researchers confused between "dispersion" and "solubilization" and use the terms interchangeably, particularly when stating the interaction of CNTs with liquids. In this article, we address this fundamental issue to give basic insight specifically to the researchers who are working with CNTs as well asgenerally to scientists who deal with nano-related research domains.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic showing the transition of the bundled to the individualized, dispersed state of carbon nanotubes in a liquid with the aid of a dispersing agent.
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Figure 1: Schematic showing the transition of the bundled to the individualized, dispersed state of carbon nanotubes in a liquid with the aid of a dispersing agent.

Mentions: As far as CNTs are concerned, even though the diameter of the tubes is in the nanometer range (approximately between 0.4 and 3 nm for single-walled carbon nanotubes, and 1.4 and 100 nm for multi-walled carbon nanotubes) [10], their length can be up to several micrometers to millimeters. Further, it is a well-known fact that CNTs are not equal in size with respect to both diameter and length. Hence, the result of dispersion techniques mostly used and adopted to produce well-dispersed CNTs in either aqueous and/or organic media are typically dispersions of differently sized tubes. Consequently, based on the definition [6,7] and the abovementioned points, the mixture of CNTs and water or organic solvents, whether in the presence or non-presence of dispersing agents such as surfactants or polymers, is just a colloidal dispersion and not a solution. Figure 1 shows the schematic illustration for the formation of dispersed CNTs in a liquid with the aid of a dispersing agent. Simultaneously, the dispersion can result in a debundling or individualization of the bundled CNTs.


Carbon nanotubes: are they dispersed or dissolved in liquids?

Geckeler KE, Premkumar T - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Schematic showing the transition of the bundled to the individualized, dispersed state of carbon nanotubes in a liquid with the aid of a dispersing agent.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211183&req=5

Figure 1: Schematic showing the transition of the bundled to the individualized, dispersed state of carbon nanotubes in a liquid with the aid of a dispersing agent.
Mentions: As far as CNTs are concerned, even though the diameter of the tubes is in the nanometer range (approximately between 0.4 and 3 nm for single-walled carbon nanotubes, and 1.4 and 100 nm for multi-walled carbon nanotubes) [10], their length can be up to several micrometers to millimeters. Further, it is a well-known fact that CNTs are not equal in size with respect to both diameter and length. Hence, the result of dispersion techniques mostly used and adopted to produce well-dispersed CNTs in either aqueous and/or organic media are typically dispersions of differently sized tubes. Consequently, based on the definition [6,7] and the abovementioned points, the mixture of CNTs and water or organic solvents, whether in the presence or non-presence of dispersing agents such as surfactants or polymers, is just a colloidal dispersion and not a solution. Figure 1 shows the schematic illustration for the formation of dispersed CNTs in a liquid with the aid of a dispersing agent. Simultaneously, the dispersion can result in a debundling or individualization of the bundled CNTs.

Bottom Line: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) constitute a novel class of nanomaterials with remarkable applications in diverse domains.However, the main intrincsic problem of CNTs is their insolubility or very poor solubility in most of the common solvents.In this article, we address this fundamental issue to give basic insight specifically to the researchers who are working with CNTs as well asgenerally to scientists who deal with nano-related research domains.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics, World-Class University (WCU), 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712, South Korea. gistprof@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) constitute a novel class of nanomaterials with remarkable applications in diverse domains. However, the main intrincsic problem of CNTs is their insolubility or very poor solubility in most of the common solvents. The basic key question here is: are carbon nanotubes dissolved or dispersed in liquids, specifically in water? When analyzing the scientific research articles published in various leading journals, we found that many researchers confused between "dispersion" and "solubilization" and use the terms interchangeably, particularly when stating the interaction of CNTs with liquids. In this article, we address this fundamental issue to give basic insight specifically to the researchers who are working with CNTs as well asgenerally to scientists who deal with nano-related research domains.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus