Limits...
Doping graphene films via chemically mediated charge transfer.

Ishikawa R, Bando M, Morimoto Y, Sandhu A - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Bottom Line: Graphene-based TCFs have attracted a lot of attention because of their high electrical conductivity, transparency, and low cost.Notably, TCNQ is well known as a powerful electron accepter and is expected to favor electron transfer from graphene into TCNQ molecules, thereby leading to p-type doping of graphene films.Small amounts of TCNQ drastically improved the resistivity without degradation of optical transparency.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8552, Japan. ishikawa.r.ab@m.titech.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT
Transparent conductive films (TCFs) are critical components of a myriad of technologies including flat panel displays, light-emitting diodes, and solar cells. Graphene-based TCFs have attracted a lot of attention because of their high electrical conductivity, transparency, and low cost. Carrier doping of graphene would potentially improve the properties of graphene-based TCFs for practical industrial applications. However, controlling the carrier type and concentration of dopants in graphene films is challenging, especially for the synthesis of p-type films. In this article, a new method for doping graphene using the conjugated organic molecule, tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ), is described. Notably, TCNQ is well known as a powerful electron accepter and is expected to favor electron transfer from graphene into TCNQ molecules, thereby leading to p-type doping of graphene films. Small amounts of TCNQ drastically improved the resistivity without degradation of optical transparency. Our carrier doping method based on charge transfer has a huge potential for graphene-based TCFs.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic image of doping graphene by adsorbed TCNQ molecules.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211156&req=5

Figure 1: Schematic image of doping graphene by adsorbed TCNQ molecules.

Mentions: Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) is well known as a powerful electron accepter and is expected to favor electron transfer from graphene into TCNQ molecules, thereby leading to p-type doping of graphene films. Figure 1 shows a schematic image of graphene doping by adsorbed TCNQ molecules. In fact, small amounts of TCNQ improved the resistivity by two orders of magnitude without degradation of optical transparency. Our new doping method opens up the possibility of graphene-based TCFs.


Doping graphene films via chemically mediated charge transfer.

Ishikawa R, Bando M, Morimoto Y, Sandhu A - Nanoscale Res Lett (2011)

Schematic image of doping graphene by adsorbed TCNQ molecules.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211156&req=5

Figure 1: Schematic image of doping graphene by adsorbed TCNQ molecules.
Mentions: Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) is well known as a powerful electron accepter and is expected to favor electron transfer from graphene into TCNQ molecules, thereby leading to p-type doping of graphene films. Figure 1 shows a schematic image of graphene doping by adsorbed TCNQ molecules. In fact, small amounts of TCNQ improved the resistivity by two orders of magnitude without degradation of optical transparency. Our new doping method opens up the possibility of graphene-based TCFs.

Bottom Line: Graphene-based TCFs have attracted a lot of attention because of their high electrical conductivity, transparency, and low cost.Notably, TCNQ is well known as a powerful electron accepter and is expected to favor electron transfer from graphene into TCNQ molecules, thereby leading to p-type doping of graphene films.Small amounts of TCNQ drastically improved the resistivity without degradation of optical transparency.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8552, Japan. ishikawa.r.ab@m.titech.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT
Transparent conductive films (TCFs) are critical components of a myriad of technologies including flat panel displays, light-emitting diodes, and solar cells. Graphene-based TCFs have attracted a lot of attention because of their high electrical conductivity, transparency, and low cost. Carrier doping of graphene would potentially improve the properties of graphene-based TCFs for practical industrial applications. However, controlling the carrier type and concentration of dopants in graphene films is challenging, especially for the synthesis of p-type films. In this article, a new method for doping graphene using the conjugated organic molecule, tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ), is described. Notably, TCNQ is well known as a powerful electron accepter and is expected to favor electron transfer from graphene into TCNQ molecules, thereby leading to p-type doping of graphene films. Small amounts of TCNQ drastically improved the resistivity without degradation of optical transparency. Our carrier doping method based on charge transfer has a huge potential for graphene-based TCFs.

No MeSH data available.