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In situ – Directed Growth of Organic Nanofibers and Nanoflakes: Electrical and Morphological Properties

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ABSTRACT

Organic nanostructures made from organic molecules such as para-hexaphenylene (p-6P) could form nanoscale components in future electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, the integration of such fragile nanostructures with the necessary interface circuitry such as metal electrodes for electrical connection continues to be a significant hindrance toward their large-scale implementation. Here, we demonstrate in situ–directed growth of such organic nanostructures between pre-fabricated contacts, which are source–drain gold electrodes on a transistor platform (bottom-gate) on silicon dioxide patterned by a combination of optical lithography and electron beam lithography. The dimensions of the gold electrodes strongly influence the morphology of the resulting structures leading to notably different electrical properties. The ability to control such nanofiber or nanoflake growth opens the possibility for large-scale optoelectronic device fabrication.

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Probability for having at least one bridging p-6P structure on a device with varied electrode widths and separation gaps.
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Figure 4: Probability for having at least one bridging p-6P structure on a device with varied electrode widths and separation gaps.

Mentions: In order for a field-effect transistor to reach saturation, short-channel effects should be avoided by having a channel length that is at least 10 times larger than the gate oxide thickness [25,26]. All experiments presented here have been made on substrates with 100 nm oxide, so in order to minimize short-channel effects, the channel length i.e. the gap to be bridged should be increased to 1 μm. The first experiments on platforms with gaps of these dimensions showed that the nanoflakes or nanofibers are not able to bridge such long gaps. In order to determine the maximum gap that the organic structures can bridge, a set of devices with varied electrodes widths w and separation gaps g were fabricated and investigated. Figure 4 illustrates the probabilities for the organic nanostructures to bridge at different configurations. The data were extracted from around 150 devices, and it shows the probability for the device to have at least one bridging structure. For g < 200 nm, the probability for bridging structures is 1, but it decreases when g increases, and it is 0 for g = 1 μm. Therefore, the chosen standard separation gap was 200 nm.


In situ – Directed Growth of Organic Nanofibers and Nanoflakes: Electrical and Morphological Properties
Probability for having at least one bridging p-6P structure on a device with varied electrode widths and separation gaps.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211154&req=5

Figure 4: Probability for having at least one bridging p-6P structure on a device with varied electrode widths and separation gaps.
Mentions: In order for a field-effect transistor to reach saturation, short-channel effects should be avoided by having a channel length that is at least 10 times larger than the gate oxide thickness [25,26]. All experiments presented here have been made on substrates with 100 nm oxide, so in order to minimize short-channel effects, the channel length i.e. the gap to be bridged should be increased to 1 μm. The first experiments on platforms with gaps of these dimensions showed that the nanoflakes or nanofibers are not able to bridge such long gaps. In order to determine the maximum gap that the organic structures can bridge, a set of devices with varied electrodes widths w and separation gaps g were fabricated and investigated. Figure 4 illustrates the probabilities for the organic nanostructures to bridge at different configurations. The data were extracted from around 150 devices, and it shows the probability for the device to have at least one bridging structure. For g < 200 nm, the probability for bridging structures is 1, but it decreases when g increases, and it is 0 for g = 1 μm. Therefore, the chosen standard separation gap was 200 nm.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Organic nanostructures made from organic molecules such as para-hexaphenylene (p-6P) could form nanoscale components in future electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, the integration of such fragile nanostructures with the necessary interface circuitry such as metal electrodes for electrical connection continues to be a significant hindrance toward their large-scale implementation. Here, we demonstrate in situ&ndash;directed growth of such organic nanostructures between pre-fabricated contacts, which are source&ndash;drain gold electrodes on a transistor platform (bottom-gate) on silicon dioxide patterned by a combination of optical lithography and electron beam lithography. The dimensions of the gold electrodes strongly influence the morphology of the resulting structures leading to notably different electrical properties. The ability to control such nanofiber or nanoflake growth opens the possibility for large-scale optoelectronic device fabrication.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus