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In situ – Directed Growth of Organic Nanofibers and Nanoflakes: Electrical and Morphological Properties

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ABSTRACT

Organic nanostructures made from organic molecules such as para-hexaphenylene (p-6P) could form nanoscale components in future electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, the integration of such fragile nanostructures with the necessary interface circuitry such as metal electrodes for electrical connection continues to be a significant hindrance toward their large-scale implementation. Here, we demonstrate in situ–directed growth of such organic nanostructures between pre-fabricated contacts, which are source–drain gold electrodes on a transistor platform (bottom-gate) on silicon dioxide patterned by a combination of optical lithography and electron beam lithography. The dimensions of the gold electrodes strongly influence the morphology of the resulting structures leading to notably different electrical properties. The ability to control such nanofiber or nanoflake growth opens the possibility for large-scale optoelectronic device fabrication.

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a, b AFM images of gold electrodes with g = 200 nm and a w = 150 nm (nanoflakes) and b 2.4 μm (nanofibers) after p-6P deposition. The cross-sectional profiles of both organic structures are shown in (c)
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Figure 2: a, b AFM images of gold electrodes with g = 200 nm and a w = 150 nm (nanoflakes) and b 2.4 μm (nanofibers) after p-6P deposition. The cross-sectional profiles of both organic structures are shown in (c)

Mentions: In order to investigate how the electrode design influences the resulting nanostructures, pairs of drain and source gold electrodes were fabricated with the separation gap g varying from 150 nm to 1 μm and the electrode width w between 150 nm and 2.4 μm; see Figure 1a. Upon deposition of p-6P molecules, elongated organic nanostructures are formed on the gold surfaces and in most cases bridge the gaps, thereby establishing electrical connection. Figure 1b,c shows SEM images of nanostructures grown on electrodes with two different widths at a gap of 200 nm. The AFM images and cross-sectional profile of each of the p-6P structures are shown in Figure 2. In both cases, the p-6P nanostructures are bridging the gaps; however, there is a difference in the morphology of structures depending on the electrode width. Narrow gold electrodes (Figure 2a) lead to tall and narrow nanostructures (here termed "nanoflakes"). This type of structures is also observed for nanostructures formed on alumina templates without gold coating [24]. Wider electrodes (Figure 2b) lead to fiber-like nanostructures ("nanofibers") more resembling those grown on plane (non-structured) gold surfaces.


In situ – Directed Growth of Organic Nanofibers and Nanoflakes: Electrical and Morphological Properties
a, b AFM images of gold electrodes with g = 200 nm and a w = 150 nm (nanoflakes) and b 2.4 μm (nanofibers) after p-6P deposition. The cross-sectional profiles of both organic structures are shown in (c)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211154&req=5

Figure 2: a, b AFM images of gold electrodes with g = 200 nm and a w = 150 nm (nanoflakes) and b 2.4 μm (nanofibers) after p-6P deposition. The cross-sectional profiles of both organic structures are shown in (c)
Mentions: In order to investigate how the electrode design influences the resulting nanostructures, pairs of drain and source gold electrodes were fabricated with the separation gap g varying from 150 nm to 1 μm and the electrode width w between 150 nm and 2.4 μm; see Figure 1a. Upon deposition of p-6P molecules, elongated organic nanostructures are formed on the gold surfaces and in most cases bridge the gaps, thereby establishing electrical connection. Figure 1b,c shows SEM images of nanostructures grown on electrodes with two different widths at a gap of 200 nm. The AFM images and cross-sectional profile of each of the p-6P structures are shown in Figure 2. In both cases, the p-6P nanostructures are bridging the gaps; however, there is a difference in the morphology of structures depending on the electrode width. Narrow gold electrodes (Figure 2a) lead to tall and narrow nanostructures (here termed "nanoflakes"). This type of structures is also observed for nanostructures formed on alumina templates without gold coating [24]. Wider electrodes (Figure 2b) lead to fiber-like nanostructures ("nanofibers") more resembling those grown on plane (non-structured) gold surfaces.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Organic nanostructures made from organic molecules such as para-hexaphenylene (p-6P) could form nanoscale components in future electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, the integration of such fragile nanostructures with the necessary interface circuitry such as metal electrodes for electrical connection continues to be a significant hindrance toward their large-scale implementation. Here, we demonstrate in situ–directed growth of such organic nanostructures between pre-fabricated contacts, which are source–drain gold electrodes on a transistor platform (bottom-gate) on silicon dioxide patterned by a combination of optical lithography and electron beam lithography. The dimensions of the gold electrodes strongly influence the morphology of the resulting structures leading to notably different electrical properties. The ability to control such nanofiber or nanoflake growth opens the possibility for large-scale optoelectronic device fabrication.

No MeSH data available.