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Haptic/graphic rehabilitation: integrating a robot into a virtual environment library and applying it to stroke therapy.

Sharp I, Patton J, Listenberger M, Case E - J Vis Exp (2011)

Bottom Line: However, recent efforts in the open source community have proposed a wrapper class approach that can elicit nearly identical responses regardless of the robot used.The result can lead researchers across the globe to perform similar experiments using shared code.Therefore modular "switching out"of one robot for another would not affect development time.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago and Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, USA.

ABSTRACT
Recent research that tests interactive devices for prolonged therapy practice has revealed new prospects for robotics combined with graphical and other forms of biofeedback. Previous human-robot interactive systems have required different software commands to be implemented for each robot leading to unnecessary developmental overhead time each time a new system becomes available. For example, when a haptic/graphic virtual reality environment has been coded for one specific robot to provide haptic feedback, that specific robot would not be able to be traded for another robot without recoding the program. However, recent efforts in the open source community have proposed a wrapper class approach that can elicit nearly identical responses regardless of the robot used. The result can lead researchers across the globe to perform similar experiments using shared code. Therefore modular "switching out"of one robot for another would not affect development time. In this paper, we outline the successful creation and implementation of a wrapper class for one robot into the open-source H3DAPI, which integrates the software commands most commonly used by all robots.

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Haptic/graphic rehabilitation: integrating a robot into a virtual environment library and applying it to stroke therapy.

Sharp I, Patton J, Listenberger M, Case E - J Vis Exp (2011)

© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3211130&req=5

Bottom Line: However, recent efforts in the open source community have proposed a wrapper class approach that can elicit nearly identical responses regardless of the robot used.The result can lead researchers across the globe to perform similar experiments using shared code.Therefore modular "switching out"of one robot for another would not affect development time.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago and Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, USA.

ABSTRACT
Recent research that tests interactive devices for prolonged therapy practice has revealed new prospects for robotics combined with graphical and other forms of biofeedback. Previous human-robot interactive systems have required different software commands to be implemented for each robot leading to unnecessary developmental overhead time each time a new system becomes available. For example, when a haptic/graphic virtual reality environment has been coded for one specific robot to provide haptic feedback, that specific robot would not be able to be traded for another robot without recoding the program. However, recent efforts in the open source community have proposed a wrapper class approach that can elicit nearly identical responses regardless of the robot used. The result can lead researchers across the globe to perform similar experiments using shared code. Therefore modular "switching out"of one robot for another would not affect development time. In this paper, we outline the successful creation and implementation of a wrapper class for one robot into the open-source H3DAPI, which integrates the software commands most commonly used by all robots.

Show MeSH