Limits...
Anthropometrically determined nutritional status of urban primary schoolchildren in Makurdi, Nigeria.

Goon DT, Toriola AL, Shaw BS, Amusa LO, Monyeki MA, Akinyemi O, Alabi OA - BMC Public Health (2011)

Bottom Line: Conversely, girls tend to be more stunted (56.8%) compared to boys (48.4%) (p = 0.004; p < 0.05).Most of the children are underweight, stunted and thinned.As such, providing community education on environmental sanitation and personal hygienic practices, proper child rearing, breast-feeding and weaning practices would possibly reverse the trends.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Sport, Rehabilitation and Dental Sciences, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria, South Africa. daniel_goon2004@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Background: No information exists on the nutritional status of primary school children residing in Makurdi, Nigeria. It is envisaged that the data could serve as baseline data for future studies, as well as inform public health policy. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of malnutrition among urban school children in Makurdi, Nigeria.

Methods: Height and weight of 2015 (979 boys and 1036 girls), aged 9-12 years, attending public primary school in Makurdi were measured and the body mass index (BMI) calculated. Anthropometric indices of weight-for-age (WA) and height-for-age (HA) were used to estimate the children's nutritional status. The BMI thinness classification was also calculated.

Results: Underweight (WAZ < -2) and stunting (HAZ < -2) occurred in 43.4% and 52.7%, respectively. WAZ and HAZ mean scores of the children were -0.91(SD = 0.43) and -0.83 (SD = 0.54), respectively. Boys were more underweight (48.8%) than girls (38.5%), and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.024; p < 0.05). Conversely, girls tend to be more stunted (56.8%) compared to boys (48.4%) (p = 0.004; p < 0.05). Normal WAZ and HAZ occurred in 54.6% and 44.2% of the children, respectively. Using the 2007 World Health Organisation BMI thinness classification, majority of the children exhibited Grade 1 thinness (77.3%), which was predominant at all ages (9-12 years) in both boys and girls. Gender wise, 79.8% boys and 75.0% girls fall within the Grade I thinness category. Based on the WHO classification, severe malnutrition occurred in 31.3% of the children.

Conclusions: There is severe malnutrition among the school children living in Makurdi. Most of the children are underweight, stunted and thinned. As such, providing community education on environmental sanitation and personal hygienic practices, proper child rearing, breast-feeding and weaning practices would possibly reverse the trends.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Nutritional status of pre-adolescents school children stratified by gender.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3198944&req=5

Figure 1: Nutritional status of pre-adolescents school children stratified by gender.

Mentions: Shown in Figure 1 is the nutritional status of pre-adolescent school children stratified by gender. The prevalence of underweight status was higher in boys than the girls, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.004; p < 0.05). Conversely, girls tended to be more stunted compared to boys and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.004; p < 0.05). Based on the WHO classification of severity of malnutrition, the prevalence of underweight and stunting was 31.3% among the children.


Anthropometrically determined nutritional status of urban primary schoolchildren in Makurdi, Nigeria.

Goon DT, Toriola AL, Shaw BS, Amusa LO, Monyeki MA, Akinyemi O, Alabi OA - BMC Public Health (2011)

Nutritional status of pre-adolescents school children stratified by gender.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3198944&req=5

Figure 1: Nutritional status of pre-adolescents school children stratified by gender.
Mentions: Shown in Figure 1 is the nutritional status of pre-adolescent school children stratified by gender. The prevalence of underweight status was higher in boys than the girls, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.004; p < 0.05). Conversely, girls tended to be more stunted compared to boys and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.004; p < 0.05). Based on the WHO classification of severity of malnutrition, the prevalence of underweight and stunting was 31.3% among the children.

Bottom Line: Conversely, girls tend to be more stunted (56.8%) compared to boys (48.4%) (p = 0.004; p < 0.05).Most of the children are underweight, stunted and thinned.As such, providing community education on environmental sanitation and personal hygienic practices, proper child rearing, breast-feeding and weaning practices would possibly reverse the trends.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Sport, Rehabilitation and Dental Sciences, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria, South Africa. daniel_goon2004@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Background: No information exists on the nutritional status of primary school children residing in Makurdi, Nigeria. It is envisaged that the data could serve as baseline data for future studies, as well as inform public health policy. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of malnutrition among urban school children in Makurdi, Nigeria.

Methods: Height and weight of 2015 (979 boys and 1036 girls), aged 9-12 years, attending public primary school in Makurdi were measured and the body mass index (BMI) calculated. Anthropometric indices of weight-for-age (WA) and height-for-age (HA) were used to estimate the children's nutritional status. The BMI thinness classification was also calculated.

Results: Underweight (WAZ < -2) and stunting (HAZ < -2) occurred in 43.4% and 52.7%, respectively. WAZ and HAZ mean scores of the children were -0.91(SD = 0.43) and -0.83 (SD = 0.54), respectively. Boys were more underweight (48.8%) than girls (38.5%), and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.024; p < 0.05). Conversely, girls tend to be more stunted (56.8%) compared to boys (48.4%) (p = 0.004; p < 0.05). Normal WAZ and HAZ occurred in 54.6% and 44.2% of the children, respectively. Using the 2007 World Health Organisation BMI thinness classification, majority of the children exhibited Grade 1 thinness (77.3%), which was predominant at all ages (9-12 years) in both boys and girls. Gender wise, 79.8% boys and 75.0% girls fall within the Grade I thinness category. Based on the WHO classification, severe malnutrition occurred in 31.3% of the children.

Conclusions: There is severe malnutrition among the school children living in Makurdi. Most of the children are underweight, stunted and thinned. As such, providing community education on environmental sanitation and personal hygienic practices, proper child rearing, breast-feeding and weaning practices would possibly reverse the trends.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus