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Haemodialysis in an emerging centre in a developing country: a two year review and predictors of mortality.

Ekrikpo UE, Udo AI, Ikpeme EE, Effa EE - BMC Nephrol (2011)

Bottom Line: Males and females had similar characteristics at baseline except for a higher median serum urea in the males.This study has highlighted the unchanging demographics of our advanced kidney failure patients.Efforts should be aimed at subsidizing the cost of dialysis for our teeming population of dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Haemodialysis Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Uyo Teaching Hospital, Uyo, Nigeria. udekrikpo@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Haemodialysis is the most common form of renal replacement therapy in Nigeria. The high cost of haemodialysis has made optimal therapy of end-stage renal disease difficult in Nigeria. This paper is a review of data collected over two years of provision of dialysis services in a new tertiary hospital in Southern Nigeria.

Methods: This retrospective analysis is done on data obtained from the patient case files and dialysis records in the first two years of provision of dialysis services in our centre. A gender comparison of the patients' baseline sociodemographic, clinical and biochemical was performed and a logistic regression model used to assess the predictors of mortality.

Results: A total of 98 patients had 471 sessions in the two years under review. Males and females had similar characteristics at baseline except for a higher median serum urea in the males. The commonest causes of end-stage renal disease were chronic glomerulonephritis (34.5%), hypertension (32.1%) and diabetes mellitus (17.9%). The main predictor of mortality was under treatment with haemodialysis due to inability to pay for more than a few dialysis sessions.

Conclusions: This study has highlighted the unchanging demographics of our advanced kidney failure patients. Efforts should be aimed at subsidizing the cost of dialysis for our teeming population of dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease patients.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Age distribution of dialysis patients by gender.
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Figure 2: Age distribution of dialysis patients by gender.

Mentions: A total of 98 patients were dialyzed in the period under review. They had a total of 471 dialysis sessions with the median number of sessions per patient being three. Fifty seven percent of the patients were males while 43% were females with a male: female ratio of 1.3:1. The median age at initiation of dialysis was 47.5 years (Males 47 years; Females 48 years) with a range of 12-72 years. Most were in the 20-59 year age group (Figure 2).


Haemodialysis in an emerging centre in a developing country: a two year review and predictors of mortality.

Ekrikpo UE, Udo AI, Ikpeme EE, Effa EE - BMC Nephrol (2011)

Age distribution of dialysis patients by gender.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3198883&req=5

Figure 2: Age distribution of dialysis patients by gender.
Mentions: A total of 98 patients were dialyzed in the period under review. They had a total of 471 dialysis sessions with the median number of sessions per patient being three. Fifty seven percent of the patients were males while 43% were females with a male: female ratio of 1.3:1. The median age at initiation of dialysis was 47.5 years (Males 47 years; Females 48 years) with a range of 12-72 years. Most were in the 20-59 year age group (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Males and females had similar characteristics at baseline except for a higher median serum urea in the males.This study has highlighted the unchanging demographics of our advanced kidney failure patients.Efforts should be aimed at subsidizing the cost of dialysis for our teeming population of dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Haemodialysis Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Uyo Teaching Hospital, Uyo, Nigeria. udekrikpo@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Haemodialysis is the most common form of renal replacement therapy in Nigeria. The high cost of haemodialysis has made optimal therapy of end-stage renal disease difficult in Nigeria. This paper is a review of data collected over two years of provision of dialysis services in a new tertiary hospital in Southern Nigeria.

Methods: This retrospective analysis is done on data obtained from the patient case files and dialysis records in the first two years of provision of dialysis services in our centre. A gender comparison of the patients' baseline sociodemographic, clinical and biochemical was performed and a logistic regression model used to assess the predictors of mortality.

Results: A total of 98 patients had 471 sessions in the two years under review. Males and females had similar characteristics at baseline except for a higher median serum urea in the males. The commonest causes of end-stage renal disease were chronic glomerulonephritis (34.5%), hypertension (32.1%) and diabetes mellitus (17.9%). The main predictor of mortality was under treatment with haemodialysis due to inability to pay for more than a few dialysis sessions.

Conclusions: This study has highlighted the unchanging demographics of our advanced kidney failure patients. Efforts should be aimed at subsidizing the cost of dialysis for our teeming population of dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease patients.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus