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GOMMA: a component-based infrastructure for managing and analyzing life science ontologies and their evolution.

Kirsten T, Gross A, Hartung M, Rahm E - J Biomed Semantics (2011)

Bottom Line: Their increasing size and the high frequency of updates resulting in a large set of ontology versions necessitates efficient management and analysis of this data.We introduce the component-based infrastructure and show analysis results for selected components and life science applications.GOMMA complements OnEX by providing functionalities to manage various versions of mappings between two ontologies and allows combining different match approaches.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Interdisciplinary Centre for Bioinformatics, Universität Leipzig, Härtelstraße 16-18, 04107 Leipzig, Germany. tkirsten@izbi.uni-leipzig.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: Ontologies are increasingly used to structure and semantically describe entities of domains, such as genes and proteins in life sciences. Their increasing size and the high frequency of updates resulting in a large set of ontology versions necessitates efficient management and analysis of this data.

Results: We present GOMMA, a generic infrastructure for managing and analyzing life science ontologies and their evolution. GOMMA utilizes a generic repository to uniformly and efficiently manage ontology versions and different kinds of mappings. Furthermore, it provides components for ontology matching, and determining evolutionary ontology changes. These components are used by analysis tools, such as the Ontology Evolution Explorer (OnEX) and the detection of unstable ontology regions. We introduce the component-based infrastructure and show analysis results for selected components and life science applications. GOMMA is available at http://dbs.uni-leipzig.de/GOMMA.

Conclusions: GOMMA provides a comprehensive and scalable infrastructure to manage large life science ontologies and analyze their evolution. Key functions include a generic storage of ontology versions and mappings, support for ontology matching and determining ontology changes. The supported features for analyzing ontology changes are helpful to assess their impact on ontology-dependent applications such as for term enrichment. GOMMA complements OnEX by providing functionalities to manage various versions of mappings between two ontologies and allows combining different match approaches.

No MeSH data available.


Overview of GOMMA's component-based infrastructure.
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Figure 2: Overview of GOMMA's component-based infrastructure.

Mentions: Figure 2 shows the architecture of the component-based GOMMA infrastructure. It consists of three levels, namely repository, functional components, and tools. The repository centrally and uniformly manages all versions of ontologies, entities, and the different kinds of mappings (annotation mappings, ontology mappings, and evolution mappings) introduced in the Background section (see also Figure 1).


GOMMA: a component-based infrastructure for managing and analyzing life science ontologies and their evolution.

Kirsten T, Gross A, Hartung M, Rahm E - J Biomed Semantics (2011)

Overview of GOMMA's component-based infrastructure.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3198872&req=5

Figure 2: Overview of GOMMA's component-based infrastructure.
Mentions: Figure 2 shows the architecture of the component-based GOMMA infrastructure. It consists of three levels, namely repository, functional components, and tools. The repository centrally and uniformly manages all versions of ontologies, entities, and the different kinds of mappings (annotation mappings, ontology mappings, and evolution mappings) introduced in the Background section (see also Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Their increasing size and the high frequency of updates resulting in a large set of ontology versions necessitates efficient management and analysis of this data.We introduce the component-based infrastructure and show analysis results for selected components and life science applications.GOMMA complements OnEX by providing functionalities to manage various versions of mappings between two ontologies and allows combining different match approaches.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Interdisciplinary Centre for Bioinformatics, Universität Leipzig, Härtelstraße 16-18, 04107 Leipzig, Germany. tkirsten@izbi.uni-leipzig.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: Ontologies are increasingly used to structure and semantically describe entities of domains, such as genes and proteins in life sciences. Their increasing size and the high frequency of updates resulting in a large set of ontology versions necessitates efficient management and analysis of this data.

Results: We present GOMMA, a generic infrastructure for managing and analyzing life science ontologies and their evolution. GOMMA utilizes a generic repository to uniformly and efficiently manage ontology versions and different kinds of mappings. Furthermore, it provides components for ontology matching, and determining evolutionary ontology changes. These components are used by analysis tools, such as the Ontology Evolution Explorer (OnEX) and the detection of unstable ontology regions. We introduce the component-based infrastructure and show analysis results for selected components and life science applications. GOMMA is available at http://dbs.uni-leipzig.de/GOMMA.

Conclusions: GOMMA provides a comprehensive and scalable infrastructure to manage large life science ontologies and analyze their evolution. Key functions include a generic storage of ontology versions and mappings, support for ontology matching and determining ontology changes. The supported features for analyzing ontology changes are helpful to assess their impact on ontology-dependent applications such as for term enrichment. GOMMA complements OnEX by providing functionalities to manage various versions of mappings between two ontologies and allows combining different match approaches.

No MeSH data available.