Limits...
Primary plasmacytoma of the testicle: a case report.

Berrondo C, Gorman TE, Yap RL - J Med Case Rep (2011)

Bottom Line: They rarely occur in the testis, and are commonly associated with concurrent multiple myeloma at the time of diagnosis.At the time of diagnosis, our patient did not have multiple myeloma, and is currently undergoing chemotherapy for treatment of his disease.This condition should be in the differential diagnosis in elderly men.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Concord Hospital Center for Urologic Care, 246 Pleasant Street, Memorial Building G-2 Concord, NH 03301, USA. ryap@crhc.org.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Extramedullary plasmacytoma is a rare plasma cell neoplasm. Plasmacytomas are most commonly found in the head and neck region, but can occur in many other locations. They rarely occur in the testis, and are commonly associated with concurrent multiple myeloma at the time of diagnosis. Isolated plasmacytoma of the testis is exceedingly rare, with few cases reported in the literature.

Case presentation: A 72-year-old Caucasian man presented with a painless testicular mass treated by orchiectomy. The mass was determined to be plasmacytoma on pathological examination. At the time of diagnosis, our patient did not have multiple myeloma, and is currently undergoing chemotherapy for treatment of his disease.

Conclusion: Isolated plasmacytoma of the testicle is a rare cause of testicular mass, and is seldom reported in the literature. Patients with this disease require careful monitoring because of their high risk of progression to multiple myeloma. The diagnosis of testicular plasmacytoma can be challenging for primary care doctors and urologic specialists. This condition should be in the differential diagnosis in elderly men.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Hematoxylin and eosin stain of a section of the tumor removed from the left testicle.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3198716&req=5

Figure 2: Hematoxylin and eosin stain of a section of the tumor removed from the left testicle.

Mentions: A 72-year-old Caucasian man presented to clinic complaining of a painless left testicular mass. He had no associated bone pain or weight loss. A physical exam revealed a nontender 3 by 5 cm indurated mass in his left testicle. A comprehensive metabolic panel and complete blood count (CBC) revealed a total protein of 8.3, but were otherwise normal. Tumor markers (α-fetoprotein, lactate dehydrogenase, β-human chorionic growth hormone) were negative. On a scrotal ultrasound, the mass appeared multilobar and heterogeneous, thus raising concern for malignancy (Figure 1). Our patient underwent an uncomplicated left inguinal radical orchiectomy. Pathologic evaluation of the testicular mass demonstrated plasmacytoma (Figure 2). Serum protein electrophoresis (SPEP) showed an immunoglobulin A (IgA) level of 2631 mg/dL indicative of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). A skeletal survey was negative for coexisting lesions. A bone marrow biopsy was negative for clonal plasma cells. Our patient continued follow-up with medical oncology and subsequently developed metastatic disease two and a half years later, detected by skeletal survey. He is currently being treated with the chemotherapeutic agent bortezomib with dexamethasone and zoledronic acid.


Primary plasmacytoma of the testicle: a case report.

Berrondo C, Gorman TE, Yap RL - J Med Case Rep (2011)

Hematoxylin and eosin stain of a section of the tumor removed from the left testicle.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3198716&req=5

Figure 2: Hematoxylin and eosin stain of a section of the tumor removed from the left testicle.
Mentions: A 72-year-old Caucasian man presented to clinic complaining of a painless left testicular mass. He had no associated bone pain or weight loss. A physical exam revealed a nontender 3 by 5 cm indurated mass in his left testicle. A comprehensive metabolic panel and complete blood count (CBC) revealed a total protein of 8.3, but were otherwise normal. Tumor markers (α-fetoprotein, lactate dehydrogenase, β-human chorionic growth hormone) were negative. On a scrotal ultrasound, the mass appeared multilobar and heterogeneous, thus raising concern for malignancy (Figure 1). Our patient underwent an uncomplicated left inguinal radical orchiectomy. Pathologic evaluation of the testicular mass demonstrated plasmacytoma (Figure 2). Serum protein electrophoresis (SPEP) showed an immunoglobulin A (IgA) level of 2631 mg/dL indicative of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). A skeletal survey was negative for coexisting lesions. A bone marrow biopsy was negative for clonal plasma cells. Our patient continued follow-up with medical oncology and subsequently developed metastatic disease two and a half years later, detected by skeletal survey. He is currently being treated with the chemotherapeutic agent bortezomib with dexamethasone and zoledronic acid.

Bottom Line: They rarely occur in the testis, and are commonly associated with concurrent multiple myeloma at the time of diagnosis.At the time of diagnosis, our patient did not have multiple myeloma, and is currently undergoing chemotherapy for treatment of his disease.This condition should be in the differential diagnosis in elderly men.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Concord Hospital Center for Urologic Care, 246 Pleasant Street, Memorial Building G-2 Concord, NH 03301, USA. ryap@crhc.org.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Extramedullary plasmacytoma is a rare plasma cell neoplasm. Plasmacytomas are most commonly found in the head and neck region, but can occur in many other locations. They rarely occur in the testis, and are commonly associated with concurrent multiple myeloma at the time of diagnosis. Isolated plasmacytoma of the testis is exceedingly rare, with few cases reported in the literature.

Case presentation: A 72-year-old Caucasian man presented with a painless testicular mass treated by orchiectomy. The mass was determined to be plasmacytoma on pathological examination. At the time of diagnosis, our patient did not have multiple myeloma, and is currently undergoing chemotherapy for treatment of his disease.

Conclusion: Isolated plasmacytoma of the testicle is a rare cause of testicular mass, and is seldom reported in the literature. Patients with this disease require careful monitoring because of their high risk of progression to multiple myeloma. The diagnosis of testicular plasmacytoma can be challenging for primary care doctors and urologic specialists. This condition should be in the differential diagnosis in elderly men.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus