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Inner speech during silent reading reflects the reader's regional accent.

Filik R, Barber E - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: To investigate this issue, we compared reading behaviour of Northern and Southern English participants who have differing pronunciations for words like 'glass', in which the vowel duration is short in a Northern accent and long in a Southern accent.The final word of the limerick (e.g., mass/sparse) then either did or did not rhyme, depending on the reader's accent.Results showed disruption to eye movement behaviour when the final word did not rhyme, determined by the reader's accent, suggesting that inner speech resembles our own voice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom. ruth.filik@nottingham.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
While reading silently, we often have the subjective experience of inner speech. However, there is currently little evidence regarding whether this inner voice resembles our own voice while we are speaking out loud. To investigate this issue, we compared reading behaviour of Northern and Southern English participants who have differing pronunciations for words like 'glass', in which the vowel duration is short in a Northern accent and long in a Southern accent. Participants' eye movements were monitored while they silently read limericks in which the end words of the first two lines (e.g., glass/class) would be pronounced differently by Northern and Southern participants. The final word of the limerick (e.g., mass/sparse) then either did or did not rhyme, depending on the reader's accent. Results showed disruption to eye movement behaviour when the final word did not rhyme, determined by the reader's accent, suggesting that inner speech resembles our own voice.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Sample eye movement trace illustrating the disruption experienced at the end of a trial (in this case for a short vowel participant reading a limerick designed to rhyme for long vowel participants only).Analysis regions are denoted by forward slashes. Circles represent fixations, and lines represent saccadic eye movements. Circles 1 and 2 represent the gaze duration on the critical word. The dashed line represents a first-pass regression out of the critical word, and a regression in to the end word of line 1. Circles 3 and 4 represent second-pass reading times for the end word of line 1, and circle 5 represents second-pass reading times for the end word of line 2. Circles 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 represent regression path (or go-past) reading times for the critical word.
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pone-0025782-g001: Sample eye movement trace illustrating the disruption experienced at the end of a trial (in this case for a short vowel participant reading a limerick designed to rhyme for long vowel participants only).Analysis regions are denoted by forward slashes. Circles represent fixations, and lines represent saccadic eye movements. Circles 1 and 2 represent the gaze duration on the critical word. The dashed line represents a first-pass regression out of the critical word, and a regression in to the end word of line 1. Circles 3 and 4 represent second-pass reading times for the end word of line 1, and circle 5 represents second-pass reading times for the end word of line 2. Circles 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 represent regression path (or go-past) reading times for the critical word.

Mentions: Materials were divided into regions for analysis (see Figure 1). Measures of eye movement behavior are reported for the critical region, which comprised the final word of the limerick (e.g., Kath, Garth). The critical word would either rhyme or not rhyme with the end words in the first two lines depending on the participant's accent. Participants' tendencies to go back and re-inspect these earlier words (e.g., Bath, path) were also examined.


Inner speech during silent reading reflects the reader's regional accent.

Filik R, Barber E - PLoS ONE (2011)

Sample eye movement trace illustrating the disruption experienced at the end of a trial (in this case for a short vowel participant reading a limerick designed to rhyme for long vowel participants only).Analysis regions are denoted by forward slashes. Circles represent fixations, and lines represent saccadic eye movements. Circles 1 and 2 represent the gaze duration on the critical word. The dashed line represents a first-pass regression out of the critical word, and a regression in to the end word of line 1. Circles 3 and 4 represent second-pass reading times for the end word of line 1, and circle 5 represents second-pass reading times for the end word of line 2. Circles 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 represent regression path (or go-past) reading times for the critical word.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3198452&req=5

pone-0025782-g001: Sample eye movement trace illustrating the disruption experienced at the end of a trial (in this case for a short vowel participant reading a limerick designed to rhyme for long vowel participants only).Analysis regions are denoted by forward slashes. Circles represent fixations, and lines represent saccadic eye movements. Circles 1 and 2 represent the gaze duration on the critical word. The dashed line represents a first-pass regression out of the critical word, and a regression in to the end word of line 1. Circles 3 and 4 represent second-pass reading times for the end word of line 1, and circle 5 represents second-pass reading times for the end word of line 2. Circles 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 represent regression path (or go-past) reading times for the critical word.
Mentions: Materials were divided into regions for analysis (see Figure 1). Measures of eye movement behavior are reported for the critical region, which comprised the final word of the limerick (e.g., Kath, Garth). The critical word would either rhyme or not rhyme with the end words in the first two lines depending on the participant's accent. Participants' tendencies to go back and re-inspect these earlier words (e.g., Bath, path) were also examined.

Bottom Line: To investigate this issue, we compared reading behaviour of Northern and Southern English participants who have differing pronunciations for words like 'glass', in which the vowel duration is short in a Northern accent and long in a Southern accent.The final word of the limerick (e.g., mass/sparse) then either did or did not rhyme, depending on the reader's accent.Results showed disruption to eye movement behaviour when the final word did not rhyme, determined by the reader's accent, suggesting that inner speech resembles our own voice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom. ruth.filik@nottingham.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
While reading silently, we often have the subjective experience of inner speech. However, there is currently little evidence regarding whether this inner voice resembles our own voice while we are speaking out loud. To investigate this issue, we compared reading behaviour of Northern and Southern English participants who have differing pronunciations for words like 'glass', in which the vowel duration is short in a Northern accent and long in a Southern accent. Participants' eye movements were monitored while they silently read limericks in which the end words of the first two lines (e.g., glass/class) would be pronounced differently by Northern and Southern participants. The final word of the limerick (e.g., mass/sparse) then either did or did not rhyme, depending on the reader's accent. Results showed disruption to eye movement behaviour when the final word did not rhyme, determined by the reader's accent, suggesting that inner speech resembles our own voice.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus