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Improved subjective symptoms of conjunctivochalasis using bipolar diathermy method for conjunctival shrinkage.

Kashima T, Akiyama H, Miura F, Kishi S - Clin Ophthalmol (2011)

Bottom Line: The mean postoperative symptom score obtained from the questionnaire was 3.27 ± 3.31, which was significantly lower than the preoperative score (P < 0.0001).Thermal cauterization can achieve conjunctival shrinkage and adherence to the subconjunctival tissues.Operation time is only a few minutes, postoperative pain is not severe, and the procedure can be performed in an outpatient clinic, all of which represent benefits to the patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Gunma University School of Medicine, Gunma, Japan. kasimatomoyuki@yahoo.co.jp

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate the improvement in subjective symptoms of conjunctivochalasis after bipolar coagulation.

Methods: Forty-three eyes of 26 patients (average age, 75.7 ± 8.4 years) were included in this study. The inferior conjunctivas were cauterized between April 2009 and June 2010. Surgery involved pinching the excess conjunctiva and performing bipolar cauterization after subconjunctival injection of a local anesthetic agent. Patients were asked to describe the postoperative foreign-body sensation and change in subjective symptoms 1 month postoperatively, with the preoperative symptom score defined as 10.

Results: Twenty-two patients (84.6%) reported symptom relief immediately after the procedure, though all patients had a mild gritty sensation for 1-2 weeks postoperatively. The mean postoperative symptom score obtained from the questionnaire was 3.27 ± 3.31, which was significantly lower than the preoperative score (P < 0.0001). No patients had experienced recurrent symptoms at the end of the follow-up period.

Conclusion: Thermal cauterization can achieve conjunctival shrinkage and adherence to the subconjunctival tissues. Operation time is only a few minutes, postoperative pain is not severe, and the procedure can be performed in an outpatient clinic, all of which represent benefits to the patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The patient presented with ocular irritation. (A) Preoperative photograph showing CCh on the edge of the lower eyelid. The patient also had keratoconjunctivitis sicca. (B) A preoperative photograph showing fluorescein staining. The CCh divides the tear meniscus into two layers. Punctate conjunctivitis is seen on the CCh.Abbreviation: CCh, conjunctivochalasis.
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f3-opth-5-1391: The patient presented with ocular irritation. (A) Preoperative photograph showing CCh on the edge of the lower eyelid. The patient also had keratoconjunctivitis sicca. (B) A preoperative photograph showing fluorescein staining. The CCh divides the tear meniscus into two layers. Punctate conjunctivitis is seen on the CCh.Abbreviation: CCh, conjunctivochalasis.

Mentions: All patients reported only mild postoperative irritation. A total of 24 patients had conjunctival injection that resolved within 2 weeks, though this was prolonged for 1 month in two patients with severe dry eye. The coagulated region was stained with fluorescein 1 week postoperatively in all patients. The subjective symptoms resolved along with diminution of the staining. The coagulated conjunctiva adhered to the sclera or Tenon’s capsule within 1 month (Figures 3–5), and the integrity of the tear meniscus was restored in all but two patients. These two patients had severe CCh with drooping lower eyelids, and residual postoperative CCh. No severe side effects such as symblepharon or restriction of ocular motility developed. The subjective symptoms clearly decreased, but a second surgery was performed to further improve the outcome in one patient. A normal tear meniscus was obtained after the second procedure. No recurrent CCh developed postoperatively in any patient during the observation period.


Improved subjective symptoms of conjunctivochalasis using bipolar diathermy method for conjunctival shrinkage.

Kashima T, Akiyama H, Miura F, Kishi S - Clin Ophthalmol (2011)

The patient presented with ocular irritation. (A) Preoperative photograph showing CCh on the edge of the lower eyelid. The patient also had keratoconjunctivitis sicca. (B) A preoperative photograph showing fluorescein staining. The CCh divides the tear meniscus into two layers. Punctate conjunctivitis is seen on the CCh.Abbreviation: CCh, conjunctivochalasis.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3198412&req=5

f3-opth-5-1391: The patient presented with ocular irritation. (A) Preoperative photograph showing CCh on the edge of the lower eyelid. The patient also had keratoconjunctivitis sicca. (B) A preoperative photograph showing fluorescein staining. The CCh divides the tear meniscus into two layers. Punctate conjunctivitis is seen on the CCh.Abbreviation: CCh, conjunctivochalasis.
Mentions: All patients reported only mild postoperative irritation. A total of 24 patients had conjunctival injection that resolved within 2 weeks, though this was prolonged for 1 month in two patients with severe dry eye. The coagulated region was stained with fluorescein 1 week postoperatively in all patients. The subjective symptoms resolved along with diminution of the staining. The coagulated conjunctiva adhered to the sclera or Tenon’s capsule within 1 month (Figures 3–5), and the integrity of the tear meniscus was restored in all but two patients. These two patients had severe CCh with drooping lower eyelids, and residual postoperative CCh. No severe side effects such as symblepharon or restriction of ocular motility developed. The subjective symptoms clearly decreased, but a second surgery was performed to further improve the outcome in one patient. A normal tear meniscus was obtained after the second procedure. No recurrent CCh developed postoperatively in any patient during the observation period.

Bottom Line: The mean postoperative symptom score obtained from the questionnaire was 3.27 ± 3.31, which was significantly lower than the preoperative score (P < 0.0001).Thermal cauterization can achieve conjunctival shrinkage and adherence to the subconjunctival tissues.Operation time is only a few minutes, postoperative pain is not severe, and the procedure can be performed in an outpatient clinic, all of which represent benefits to the patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Gunma University School of Medicine, Gunma, Japan. kasimatomoyuki@yahoo.co.jp

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate the improvement in subjective symptoms of conjunctivochalasis after bipolar coagulation.

Methods: Forty-three eyes of 26 patients (average age, 75.7 ± 8.4 years) were included in this study. The inferior conjunctivas were cauterized between April 2009 and June 2010. Surgery involved pinching the excess conjunctiva and performing bipolar cauterization after subconjunctival injection of a local anesthetic agent. Patients were asked to describe the postoperative foreign-body sensation and change in subjective symptoms 1 month postoperatively, with the preoperative symptom score defined as 10.

Results: Twenty-two patients (84.6%) reported symptom relief immediately after the procedure, though all patients had a mild gritty sensation for 1-2 weeks postoperatively. The mean postoperative symptom score obtained from the questionnaire was 3.27 ± 3.31, which was significantly lower than the preoperative score (P < 0.0001). No patients had experienced recurrent symptoms at the end of the follow-up period.

Conclusion: Thermal cauterization can achieve conjunctival shrinkage and adherence to the subconjunctival tissues. Operation time is only a few minutes, postoperative pain is not severe, and the procedure can be performed in an outpatient clinic, all of which represent benefits to the patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus