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Integrated analysis of three bacterial conjunctivitis trials of besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension, 0.6%: etiology of bacterial conjunctivitis and antibacterial susceptibility profile.

Haas W, Gearinger LS, Usner DW, Decory HH, Morris TW - Clin Ophthalmol (2011)

Bottom Line: Against ciprofloxacin-resistant MRSA and MRSE, besifloxacin was four-fold to ≥ 128-fold more potent than other fluoroquinolones.Patient age and local antibiotic resistance trends should be considered in the treatment of this ocular infection.Besifloxacin showed broad-spectrum in vitro activity and was particularly potent against multidrug-resistant staphylococcal isolates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Microbiology and Sterilization Sciences, Bausch and Lomb Inc, Rochester, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: The purpose of this paper is to report on the bacterial species isolated from patients with bacterial conjunctivitis participating in three clinical trials of besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension, 0.6%, and their in vitro antibacterial susceptibility profiles.

Methods: Microbial data from three clinical studies, conducted at multiple clinical sites in the US and Asia were integrated. Species were identified at a central laboratory, and minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined for various antibiotics, including β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, and macrolides.

Results: A total of 1324 bacterial pathogens representing more than 70 species were isolated. The most common species were Haemophilus influenzae (26.0%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (22.8%), Staphylococcus aureus (14.4%), and Staphylococcus epidermidis (8.4%). H. influenzae was most frequently isolated among patients aged 1-18 years, while S. aureus was most prevalent among those >65 years. Drug resistance was prevalent: Of H. influenzae isolates, 25.3% were β-lactamase positive and 27.2% of S. pneumoniae isolates were penicillin-intermediate/ resistant; of S. aureus isolates, 13.7% were methicillin-resistant (MRSA), and of these, 65.4% were ciprofloxacin-resistant, while 45.9% of S. epidermidis isolates were methicillin-resistant (MRSE), and, of these, 47.1% were ciprofloxacin-resistant. Besifloxacin was more potent than comparator fluoroquinolones overall, and particularly against Gram-positive bacteria. Against ciprofloxacin-resistant MRSA and MRSE, besifloxacin was four-fold to ≥ 128-fold more potent than other fluoroquinolones.

Conclusions: While the pathogen distribution in bacterial conjunctivitis has not changed, drug resistance is increasing. Patient age and local antibiotic resistance trends should be considered in the treatment of this ocular infection. Besifloxacin showed broad-spectrum in vitro activity and was particularly potent against multidrug-resistant staphylococcal isolates.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and other species among bacterial conjunctivitis isolates stratified by age group.
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f1-opth-5-1369: Distribution of Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and other species among bacterial conjunctivitis isolates stratified by age group.

Mentions: Of the isolates, 11.8% (156/1324) were contributed by patients aged 1–2 years, 32.3% (428/1324) by patients aged 3–18 years, 40.7% (539/1324) by patients aged 19–64 years, and 15.2% (201/1324) by patients aged 65 years and older. Figure 1 presents the pathogen distribution by age group. H. influenzae was the most prevalent species in patients aged 1–2 years, representing 46.8% (73/156) of the isolates in that age group, and gradually decreased in prevalence as the patient age increased. However, even in the patients aged 65 years and older, 13.4% (27/201) of all isolates were H. influenzae. S. pneumoniae was commonly isolated from patients 1–64 years of age and peaked with 29.7% (127/428) in the 3–18-year age group. Only 9.5% (19/201) of isolates in the 65+ age group were S. pneumoniae. Other species of Streptococcus, most notably those belonging to the Streptococcus mitis group, were also more prevalent in younger than in older patients (data not shown). Moraxella spp accounted for only 23 isolates, but those were more frequently isolated from patients aged 1–2 years and 3–18 years compared with older patients.


Integrated analysis of three bacterial conjunctivitis trials of besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension, 0.6%: etiology of bacterial conjunctivitis and antibacterial susceptibility profile.

Haas W, Gearinger LS, Usner DW, Decory HH, Morris TW - Clin Ophthalmol (2011)

Distribution of Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and other species among bacterial conjunctivitis isolates stratified by age group.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3198410&req=5

f1-opth-5-1369: Distribution of Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and other species among bacterial conjunctivitis isolates stratified by age group.
Mentions: Of the isolates, 11.8% (156/1324) were contributed by patients aged 1–2 years, 32.3% (428/1324) by patients aged 3–18 years, 40.7% (539/1324) by patients aged 19–64 years, and 15.2% (201/1324) by patients aged 65 years and older. Figure 1 presents the pathogen distribution by age group. H. influenzae was the most prevalent species in patients aged 1–2 years, representing 46.8% (73/156) of the isolates in that age group, and gradually decreased in prevalence as the patient age increased. However, even in the patients aged 65 years and older, 13.4% (27/201) of all isolates were H. influenzae. S. pneumoniae was commonly isolated from patients 1–64 years of age and peaked with 29.7% (127/428) in the 3–18-year age group. Only 9.5% (19/201) of isolates in the 65+ age group were S. pneumoniae. Other species of Streptococcus, most notably those belonging to the Streptococcus mitis group, were also more prevalent in younger than in older patients (data not shown). Moraxella spp accounted for only 23 isolates, but those were more frequently isolated from patients aged 1–2 years and 3–18 years compared with older patients.

Bottom Line: Against ciprofloxacin-resistant MRSA and MRSE, besifloxacin was four-fold to ≥ 128-fold more potent than other fluoroquinolones.Patient age and local antibiotic resistance trends should be considered in the treatment of this ocular infection.Besifloxacin showed broad-spectrum in vitro activity and was particularly potent against multidrug-resistant staphylococcal isolates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Microbiology and Sterilization Sciences, Bausch and Lomb Inc, Rochester, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: The purpose of this paper is to report on the bacterial species isolated from patients with bacterial conjunctivitis participating in three clinical trials of besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension, 0.6%, and their in vitro antibacterial susceptibility profiles.

Methods: Microbial data from three clinical studies, conducted at multiple clinical sites in the US and Asia were integrated. Species were identified at a central laboratory, and minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined for various antibiotics, including β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, and macrolides.

Results: A total of 1324 bacterial pathogens representing more than 70 species were isolated. The most common species were Haemophilus influenzae (26.0%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (22.8%), Staphylococcus aureus (14.4%), and Staphylococcus epidermidis (8.4%). H. influenzae was most frequently isolated among patients aged 1-18 years, while S. aureus was most prevalent among those >65 years. Drug resistance was prevalent: Of H. influenzae isolates, 25.3% were β-lactamase positive and 27.2% of S. pneumoniae isolates were penicillin-intermediate/ resistant; of S. aureus isolates, 13.7% were methicillin-resistant (MRSA), and of these, 65.4% were ciprofloxacin-resistant, while 45.9% of S. epidermidis isolates were methicillin-resistant (MRSE), and, of these, 47.1% were ciprofloxacin-resistant. Besifloxacin was more potent than comparator fluoroquinolones overall, and particularly against Gram-positive bacteria. Against ciprofloxacin-resistant MRSA and MRSE, besifloxacin was four-fold to ≥ 128-fold more potent than other fluoroquinolones.

Conclusions: While the pathogen distribution in bacterial conjunctivitis has not changed, drug resistance is increasing. Patient age and local antibiotic resistance trends should be considered in the treatment of this ocular infection. Besifloxacin showed broad-spectrum in vitro activity and was particularly potent against multidrug-resistant staphylococcal isolates.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus