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Presence of cartilage stem/progenitor cells in adult mice auricular perichondrium.

Kobayashi S, Takebe T, Zheng YW, Mizuno M, Yabuki Y, Maegawa J, Taniguchi H - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, LRCs were successfully isolated and cultivated from auricular cartilage.Immunocytochemical analyses showed that LRCs express CD44 and integrin-α(5).Further characterization and utilization of the cell population should improve our understanding of basic cartilage biology and lead to advances in cartilage tissue engineering and novel therapeutic strategies for patients with craniofacial defects, including long-term tissue restoration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Regenerative Medicine, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Based on evidence from several other tissues, cartilage stem/progenitor cells in the auricular cartilage presumably contribute to tissue development or homeostasis of the auricle. However, no definitive studies have identified or characterized a stem/progenitor population in mice auricle.

Methodology/principal findings: The 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) label-retaining technique was used to label dividing cells in fetal mice. Observations one year following the labeling revealed that label-retaining cells (LRCs) were present specifically in auricular perichondrium at a rate of 0.08±0.06%, but LRCs were not present in chondrium. Furthermore, LRCs were successfully isolated and cultivated from auricular cartilage. Immunocytochemical analyses showed that LRCs express CD44 and integrin-α(5). These LRCs, putative stem/progenitor cells, possess clonogenicity and chondrogenic capability in vitro.

Conclusions/significance: We have identified a population of putative cartilage stem/progenitor cells in the auricular perichondrium of mice. Further characterization and utilization of the cell population should improve our understanding of basic cartilage biology and lead to advances in cartilage tissue engineering and novel therapeutic strategies for patients with craniofacial defects, including long-term tissue restoration.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Development of murine external ears.(A) The external ear at several developmental stages. From the left, ears were photographed 3 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and 48 weeks after birth. (B) Mean surface area of the external ear and mean thickness of auricular cartilages changed during postnatal development. * ; 3 days, ; mean surface area of the external ear (mm2), ; mean thickness of auricular cartilage in the middle area of the external ear (µm) (N = 6).
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pone-0026393-g001: Development of murine external ears.(A) The external ear at several developmental stages. From the left, ears were photographed 3 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and 48 weeks after birth. (B) Mean surface area of the external ear and mean thickness of auricular cartilages changed during postnatal development. * ; 3 days, ; mean surface area of the external ear (mm2), ; mean thickness of auricular cartilage in the middle area of the external ear (µm) (N = 6).

Mentions: The mean surface area of the outer ear was 9.4±0.7 mm2, 15.9±0.3 mm2, 63.0±5.3 mm2, 175.8±10.0 mm2, 191.6±3.3 mm2, and 235.9±11.1 mm2 (N = 6) 3 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 24 weeks, and 48 weeks, respectively, following birth (Figure 1A and B). Growth of the auricle was rapid during the 4 weeks following birth, but growth slowed after that point. Mean thickness, which was measured at the identical time points, was 32.0±2.6 mm, 37.0±2.0 mm, 38.7±1.5 mm, 29.7±1.4 mm, 24.7±1.5 mm, and 23.7±1.3 mm, respectively (N = 6) (Figure 1B). The surface area of the auricular cartilage increased throughout the first 4 postnatal weeks, while the thickness of the auricular cartilage decreased over the first 2 weeks. These results indicate that cells in the auricular cartilage, which consists of chondrium and perichondrium, were proliferating rapidly within the first 4 weeks following birth. Consequently, putative stem cells, if exist, will transition to a dormant state 4 weeks post-birth. These observations let us examine the label-retaining approach to clarify the presence of stem cells in the auricle, which was well established technique to identify the dormant or slowly cycling cells.


Presence of cartilage stem/progenitor cells in adult mice auricular perichondrium.

Kobayashi S, Takebe T, Zheng YW, Mizuno M, Yabuki Y, Maegawa J, Taniguchi H - PLoS ONE (2011)

Development of murine external ears.(A) The external ear at several developmental stages. From the left, ears were photographed 3 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and 48 weeks after birth. (B) Mean surface area of the external ear and mean thickness of auricular cartilages changed during postnatal development. * ; 3 days, ; mean surface area of the external ear (mm2), ; mean thickness of auricular cartilage in the middle area of the external ear (µm) (N = 6).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3198405&req=5

pone-0026393-g001: Development of murine external ears.(A) The external ear at several developmental stages. From the left, ears were photographed 3 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and 48 weeks after birth. (B) Mean surface area of the external ear and mean thickness of auricular cartilages changed during postnatal development. * ; 3 days, ; mean surface area of the external ear (mm2), ; mean thickness of auricular cartilage in the middle area of the external ear (µm) (N = 6).
Mentions: The mean surface area of the outer ear was 9.4±0.7 mm2, 15.9±0.3 mm2, 63.0±5.3 mm2, 175.8±10.0 mm2, 191.6±3.3 mm2, and 235.9±11.1 mm2 (N = 6) 3 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 24 weeks, and 48 weeks, respectively, following birth (Figure 1A and B). Growth of the auricle was rapid during the 4 weeks following birth, but growth slowed after that point. Mean thickness, which was measured at the identical time points, was 32.0±2.6 mm, 37.0±2.0 mm, 38.7±1.5 mm, 29.7±1.4 mm, 24.7±1.5 mm, and 23.7±1.3 mm, respectively (N = 6) (Figure 1B). The surface area of the auricular cartilage increased throughout the first 4 postnatal weeks, while the thickness of the auricular cartilage decreased over the first 2 weeks. These results indicate that cells in the auricular cartilage, which consists of chondrium and perichondrium, were proliferating rapidly within the first 4 weeks following birth. Consequently, putative stem cells, if exist, will transition to a dormant state 4 weeks post-birth. These observations let us examine the label-retaining approach to clarify the presence of stem cells in the auricle, which was well established technique to identify the dormant or slowly cycling cells.

Bottom Line: Furthermore, LRCs were successfully isolated and cultivated from auricular cartilage.Immunocytochemical analyses showed that LRCs express CD44 and integrin-α(5).Further characterization and utilization of the cell population should improve our understanding of basic cartilage biology and lead to advances in cartilage tissue engineering and novel therapeutic strategies for patients with craniofacial defects, including long-term tissue restoration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Regenerative Medicine, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Based on evidence from several other tissues, cartilage stem/progenitor cells in the auricular cartilage presumably contribute to tissue development or homeostasis of the auricle. However, no definitive studies have identified or characterized a stem/progenitor population in mice auricle.

Methodology/principal findings: The 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) label-retaining technique was used to label dividing cells in fetal mice. Observations one year following the labeling revealed that label-retaining cells (LRCs) were present specifically in auricular perichondrium at a rate of 0.08±0.06%, but LRCs were not present in chondrium. Furthermore, LRCs were successfully isolated and cultivated from auricular cartilage. Immunocytochemical analyses showed that LRCs express CD44 and integrin-α(5). These LRCs, putative stem/progenitor cells, possess clonogenicity and chondrogenic capability in vitro.

Conclusions/significance: We have identified a population of putative cartilage stem/progenitor cells in the auricular perichondrium of mice. Further characterization and utilization of the cell population should improve our understanding of basic cartilage biology and lead to advances in cartilage tissue engineering and novel therapeutic strategies for patients with craniofacial defects, including long-term tissue restoration.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus