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Genotypic and phenotypic properties of cattle-associated Campylobacter and their implications to public health in the USA.

Sanad YM, Kassem II, Abley M, Gebreyes W, LeJeune JT, Rajashekara G - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: The prevalence of Campylobacter varied regionally and was significantly (P<0.05) higher in fecal samples collected from the South (32.8%) as compared to those from the North (14.8%), Midwest (15.83%), and East (12%).Furthermore, many cattle associated Campylobacter isolates showed resistance to several antimicrobials including ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, and gentamicin.Taken together, our results highlight the importance of cattle as a potential reservoir for clinically important Campylobacter.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Food Animal Health Research Program, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, The Ohio State University, Wooster, Ohio, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Since cattle are a major source of food and the cattle industry engages people from farms to processing plants and meat markets, it is conceivable that beef-products contaminated with Campylobacter spp. would pose a significant public health concern. To better understand the epidemiology of cattle-associated Campylobacter spp. in the USA, we characterized the prevalence, genotypic and phenotypic properties of these pathogens. Campylobacter were detected in 181 (19.2%) out of 944 fecal samples. Specifically, 71 C. jejuni, 132 C. coli, and 10 other Campylobacter spp. were identified. The prevalence of Campylobacter varied regionally and was significantly (P<0.05) higher in fecal samples collected from the South (32.8%) as compared to those from the North (14.8%), Midwest (15.83%), and East (12%). Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis showed that C. jejuni and C. coli isolates were genotypically diverse and certain genotypes were shared across two or more of the geographic locations. In addition, 13 new C. jejuni and two C. coli sequence types (STs) were detected by Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST). C. jejuni associated with clinically human health important sequence type, ST-61 which was not previously reported in the USA, was identified in the present study. Most frequently observed clonal complexes (CC) were CC ST-21, CC ST-42, and CC ST-61, which are also common in humans. Further, the cattle associated C. jejuni strains showed varying invasion and intracellular survival capacity; however, C. coli strains showed a lower invasion and intracellular survival potential compared to C. jejuni strains. Furthermore, many cattle associated Campylobacter isolates showed resistance to several antimicrobials including ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, and gentamicin. Taken together, our results highlight the importance of cattle as a potential reservoir for clinically important Campylobacter.

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Antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter isolated from cattle.C. jejuni (A) and C. coli (B) isolates obtained from four different locations across the US. Percentage of isolates resistant to different antimicrobials used in this study is shown. C. jejuni 81–176 and C. coli ATCC 33559 strains were used for quality control.
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pone-0025778-g002: Antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter isolated from cattle.C. jejuni (A) and C. coli (B) isolates obtained from four different locations across the US. Percentage of isolates resistant to different antimicrobials used in this study is shown. C. jejuni 81–176 and C. coli ATCC 33559 strains were used for quality control.

Mentions: To better assess the potential public health impact of the Campylobacter spp. associated with cattle, the isolates were assayed for their potential to resist antibiotics that are of both clinical and veterinary importance. Antimicrobial susceptibility was assessed on 66 (the 5 remaining isolates lost cultivability after storage) C. jejuni isolates using commercially available Sensititre Campy plates. The C. jejuni isolates were resistant to different antimicrobials including, ciprofloxacin (MIC: 4–64 µg ml−1), erythromycin (MIC: 32 µg ml−1), tetracycline (MIC: 16–64 µg ml−1), and clindamycin (MIC: 8–16 µg ml−1) (Fig. 2A). However, resistance to tetracycline was observed for the majority of the tested C. jejuni (72.7%), while resistance to nalidixic acid was observed for only 27.3% of the isolates (Fig. 2A). Furthermore, 10 (15.1%) tested C. jejuni were resistant only to tetracycline, while 34 (51.5%) isolates were resistant to 3 or more antimicrobials, including ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, nalidixic acid, erythromycin, and clindamycin. Overall, a higher percentage of C. jejuni isolates from the South region showed decreased resistance to most of the antimicrobials (See asterisk Table 2). The MRPs and antimicrobial resistance profiles of the C. jejuni isolates analyzed by MLST are summarized in Table S1.


Genotypic and phenotypic properties of cattle-associated Campylobacter and their implications to public health in the USA.

Sanad YM, Kassem II, Abley M, Gebreyes W, LeJeune JT, Rajashekara G - PLoS ONE (2011)

Antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter isolated from cattle.C. jejuni (A) and C. coli (B) isolates obtained from four different locations across the US. Percentage of isolates resistant to different antimicrobials used in this study is shown. C. jejuni 81–176 and C. coli ATCC 33559 strains were used for quality control.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3198382&req=5

pone-0025778-g002: Antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter isolated from cattle.C. jejuni (A) and C. coli (B) isolates obtained from four different locations across the US. Percentage of isolates resistant to different antimicrobials used in this study is shown. C. jejuni 81–176 and C. coli ATCC 33559 strains were used for quality control.
Mentions: To better assess the potential public health impact of the Campylobacter spp. associated with cattle, the isolates were assayed for their potential to resist antibiotics that are of both clinical and veterinary importance. Antimicrobial susceptibility was assessed on 66 (the 5 remaining isolates lost cultivability after storage) C. jejuni isolates using commercially available Sensititre Campy plates. The C. jejuni isolates were resistant to different antimicrobials including, ciprofloxacin (MIC: 4–64 µg ml−1), erythromycin (MIC: 32 µg ml−1), tetracycline (MIC: 16–64 µg ml−1), and clindamycin (MIC: 8–16 µg ml−1) (Fig. 2A). However, resistance to tetracycline was observed for the majority of the tested C. jejuni (72.7%), while resistance to nalidixic acid was observed for only 27.3% of the isolates (Fig. 2A). Furthermore, 10 (15.1%) tested C. jejuni were resistant only to tetracycline, while 34 (51.5%) isolates were resistant to 3 or more antimicrobials, including ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, nalidixic acid, erythromycin, and clindamycin. Overall, a higher percentage of C. jejuni isolates from the South region showed decreased resistance to most of the antimicrobials (See asterisk Table 2). The MRPs and antimicrobial resistance profiles of the C. jejuni isolates analyzed by MLST are summarized in Table S1.

Bottom Line: The prevalence of Campylobacter varied regionally and was significantly (P<0.05) higher in fecal samples collected from the South (32.8%) as compared to those from the North (14.8%), Midwest (15.83%), and East (12%).Furthermore, many cattle associated Campylobacter isolates showed resistance to several antimicrobials including ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, and gentamicin.Taken together, our results highlight the importance of cattle as a potential reservoir for clinically important Campylobacter.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Food Animal Health Research Program, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, The Ohio State University, Wooster, Ohio, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Since cattle are a major source of food and the cattle industry engages people from farms to processing plants and meat markets, it is conceivable that beef-products contaminated with Campylobacter spp. would pose a significant public health concern. To better understand the epidemiology of cattle-associated Campylobacter spp. in the USA, we characterized the prevalence, genotypic and phenotypic properties of these pathogens. Campylobacter were detected in 181 (19.2%) out of 944 fecal samples. Specifically, 71 C. jejuni, 132 C. coli, and 10 other Campylobacter spp. were identified. The prevalence of Campylobacter varied regionally and was significantly (P<0.05) higher in fecal samples collected from the South (32.8%) as compared to those from the North (14.8%), Midwest (15.83%), and East (12%). Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis showed that C. jejuni and C. coli isolates were genotypically diverse and certain genotypes were shared across two or more of the geographic locations. In addition, 13 new C. jejuni and two C. coli sequence types (STs) were detected by Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST). C. jejuni associated with clinically human health important sequence type, ST-61 which was not previously reported in the USA, was identified in the present study. Most frequently observed clonal complexes (CC) were CC ST-21, CC ST-42, and CC ST-61, which are also common in humans. Further, the cattle associated C. jejuni strains showed varying invasion and intracellular survival capacity; however, C. coli strains showed a lower invasion and intracellular survival potential compared to C. jejuni strains. Furthermore, many cattle associated Campylobacter isolates showed resistance to several antimicrobials including ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, and gentamicin. Taken together, our results highlight the importance of cattle as a potential reservoir for clinically important Campylobacter.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus