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Influence of familial risk on diabetes risk-reducing behaviors among U.S. adults without diabetes.

Chang MH, Valdez R, Ned RM, Liu T, Yang Q, Yesupriya A, Dowling NF, Meigs JB, Bowen MS, Khoury MJ - Diabetes Care (2011)

Bottom Line: Among them, ~39.8% reported receiving advice from a physician during the past year regarding any of the three selected behaviors compared with 29.2% of participants with no family history (P < 0.01).In univariate analysis, adults with a family history of diabetes were more likely to perform these risk-reducing behaviors compared with adults without a family history.However, fewer than half of participants with familial risk reported receiving physician advice for adopting these behaviors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. mdc9@cdc.gov

ABSTRACT

Objective: To test the association of family history of diabetes with the adoption of diabetes risk-reducing behaviors and whether this association is strengthened by physician advice or commonly known factors associated with diabetes risk.

Research design and methods: We used cross-sectional data from the 2005-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) to examine the effects of family history of diabetes on the adoption of selected risk-reducing behaviors in 8,598 adults (aged ≥20 years) without diabetes. We used multiple logistic regression to model three risk reduction behaviors (controlling or losing weight, increasing physical activity, and reducing the amount of dietary fat or calories) with family history of diabetes.

Results: Overall, 36.2% of U.S. adults without diabetes had a family history of diabetes. Among them, ~39.8% reported receiving advice from a physician during the past year regarding any of the three selected behaviors compared with 29.2% of participants with no family history (P < 0.01). In univariate analysis, adults with a family history of diabetes were more likely to perform these risk-reducing behaviors compared with adults without a family history. Physician advice was strongly associated with each of the behavioral changes (P < 0.01), and this did not differ by family history of diabetes.

Conclusions: Familial risk for diabetes and physician advice both independently influence the adoption of diabetes risk-reducing behaviors. However, fewer than half of participants with familial risk reported receiving physician advice for adopting these behaviors.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Behavior risk reduction profile of adults without diabetes by family history of diabetes, NHANES 2005–2008. *P < 0.01 for each comparison of FHx− and FHx+ participants within each behavior category. †Individuals who reported both receiving physician advice and performing the specified activity in the past 12 months; P ≥ 0.15 for each comparison of FHx− and FHx+ participants within each behavior category.
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Figure 1: Behavior risk reduction profile of adults without diabetes by family history of diabetes, NHANES 2005–2008. *P < 0.01 for each comparison of FHx− and FHx+ participants within each behavior category. †Individuals who reported both receiving physician advice and performing the specified activity in the past 12 months; P ≥ 0.15 for each comparison of FHx− and FHx+ participants within each behavior category.

Mentions: Figure 1 displays the unadjusted prevalence of the three risk reduction behaviors among adults without diabetes who, in the past 12 months, reported performing risk-reducing behaviors (regardless of receiving physician advice), reported receiving physician advice, or reported both receiving physician advice and performing the behavioral changes. Compared with FHx− adults, FHx+ adults were more likely (P < 0.01) to have controlled or lost weight, increased exercise, or changed their diet regardless of physician advice (53.2 vs. 46.5%, 48.5 vs. 44.4%, and 51.9 vs. 44.5%, respectively). For each individual risk reduction behavior, FHx+ adults were also more likely (P < 0.01) to have received physician advice about these behavior changes compared with FHx− adults (25.2 vs. 17.0%, 32.2 vs. 23.8%, and 28.8 vs. 19.3%, respectively). However, among adults who received and followed the physician advice, there were no significant differences (P ≥ 0.15) between FHx+ and FHx− adults regarding the percentage of individuals performing each of the three risk-reducing behaviors (77.2 vs. 80.5%, 67.7 vs. 70.7%, and 78.5 vs. 81.2%, respectively).


Influence of familial risk on diabetes risk-reducing behaviors among U.S. adults without diabetes.

Chang MH, Valdez R, Ned RM, Liu T, Yang Q, Yesupriya A, Dowling NF, Meigs JB, Bowen MS, Khoury MJ - Diabetes Care (2011)

Behavior risk reduction profile of adults without diabetes by family history of diabetes, NHANES 2005–2008. *P < 0.01 for each comparison of FHx− and FHx+ participants within each behavior category. †Individuals who reported both receiving physician advice and performing the specified activity in the past 12 months; P ≥ 0.15 for each comparison of FHx− and FHx+ participants within each behavior category.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3198289&req=5

Figure 1: Behavior risk reduction profile of adults without diabetes by family history of diabetes, NHANES 2005–2008. *P < 0.01 for each comparison of FHx− and FHx+ participants within each behavior category. †Individuals who reported both receiving physician advice and performing the specified activity in the past 12 months; P ≥ 0.15 for each comparison of FHx− and FHx+ participants within each behavior category.
Mentions: Figure 1 displays the unadjusted prevalence of the three risk reduction behaviors among adults without diabetes who, in the past 12 months, reported performing risk-reducing behaviors (regardless of receiving physician advice), reported receiving physician advice, or reported both receiving physician advice and performing the behavioral changes. Compared with FHx− adults, FHx+ adults were more likely (P < 0.01) to have controlled or lost weight, increased exercise, or changed their diet regardless of physician advice (53.2 vs. 46.5%, 48.5 vs. 44.4%, and 51.9 vs. 44.5%, respectively). For each individual risk reduction behavior, FHx+ adults were also more likely (P < 0.01) to have received physician advice about these behavior changes compared with FHx− adults (25.2 vs. 17.0%, 32.2 vs. 23.8%, and 28.8 vs. 19.3%, respectively). However, among adults who received and followed the physician advice, there were no significant differences (P ≥ 0.15) between FHx+ and FHx− adults regarding the percentage of individuals performing each of the three risk-reducing behaviors (77.2 vs. 80.5%, 67.7 vs. 70.7%, and 78.5 vs. 81.2%, respectively).

Bottom Line: Among them, ~39.8% reported receiving advice from a physician during the past year regarding any of the three selected behaviors compared with 29.2% of participants with no family history (P < 0.01).In univariate analysis, adults with a family history of diabetes were more likely to perform these risk-reducing behaviors compared with adults without a family history.However, fewer than half of participants with familial risk reported receiving physician advice for adopting these behaviors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. mdc9@cdc.gov

ABSTRACT

Objective: To test the association of family history of diabetes with the adoption of diabetes risk-reducing behaviors and whether this association is strengthened by physician advice or commonly known factors associated with diabetes risk.

Research design and methods: We used cross-sectional data from the 2005-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) to examine the effects of family history of diabetes on the adoption of selected risk-reducing behaviors in 8,598 adults (aged ≥20 years) without diabetes. We used multiple logistic regression to model three risk reduction behaviors (controlling or losing weight, increasing physical activity, and reducing the amount of dietary fat or calories) with family history of diabetes.

Results: Overall, 36.2% of U.S. adults without diabetes had a family history of diabetes. Among them, ~39.8% reported receiving advice from a physician during the past year regarding any of the three selected behaviors compared with 29.2% of participants with no family history (P < 0.01). In univariate analysis, adults with a family history of diabetes were more likely to perform these risk-reducing behaviors compared with adults without a family history. Physician advice was strongly associated with each of the behavioral changes (P < 0.01), and this did not differ by family history of diabetes.

Conclusions: Familial risk for diabetes and physician advice both independently influence the adoption of diabetes risk-reducing behaviors. However, fewer than half of participants with familial risk reported receiving physician advice for adopting these behaviors.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus