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Multiple Aspergillus cerebellar abscesses in a middle-aged female: case report and literature review.

Chen S, Pu JL, Yu J, Zhang JM - Int J Med Sci (2011)

Bottom Line: Aspergillus abscesses in the cerebellum are extremely rare, and most cases are solitary.The possible pathogenesis of this unusual event is discussed.Good outcome was achieved by treatment with a combination of neurosurgical resection and voriconazole (VRC) administration, which we suggest is a potential management plan.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.

ABSTRACT
Aspergillus abscesses in the cerebellum are extremely rare, and most cases are solitary. Here, we report the first case of multiple Aspergillus cerebellar abscesses in a 46-year-old female after one mastoidectomy, two craniectomies, and extended use of antibiotics. The possible pathogenesis of this unusual event is discussed. Good outcome was achieved by treatment with a combination of neurosurgical resection and voriconazole (VRC) administration, which we suggest is a potential management plan.

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Enhanced MRI and CT of the brain through the entire course of the illness. (A) and (B) Enhanced MRI showing a ring-enhancing lesion in the right cerebellum suggesting an otogenic pyogenic abscess (arrowhead). (G), (H) and (I) Enhanced MRI showing multiple oval-shaped contrast-enhanced lesions (arrow) with irregular thick peripheral enhancement which were hypointense in T1-weighted images and hyperintense in T2-weighted images and which occupied the right cerebellum.
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Figure 1: Enhanced MRI and CT of the brain through the entire course of the illness. (A) and (B) Enhanced MRI showing a ring-enhancing lesion in the right cerebellum suggesting an otogenic pyogenic abscess (arrowhead). (G), (H) and (I) Enhanced MRI showing multiple oval-shaped contrast-enhanced lesions (arrow) with irregular thick peripheral enhancement which were hypointense in T1-weighted images and hyperintense in T2-weighted images and which occupied the right cerebellum.


Multiple Aspergillus cerebellar abscesses in a middle-aged female: case report and literature review.

Chen S, Pu JL, Yu J, Zhang JM - Int J Med Sci (2011)

Enhanced MRI and CT of the brain through the entire course of the illness. (A) and (B) Enhanced MRI showing a ring-enhancing lesion in the right cerebellum suggesting an otogenic pyogenic abscess (arrowhead). (G), (H) and (I) Enhanced MRI showing multiple oval-shaped contrast-enhanced lesions (arrow) with irregular thick peripheral enhancement which were hypointense in T1-weighted images and hyperintense in T2-weighted images and which occupied the right cerebellum.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3198260&req=5

Figure 1: Enhanced MRI and CT of the brain through the entire course of the illness. (A) and (B) Enhanced MRI showing a ring-enhancing lesion in the right cerebellum suggesting an otogenic pyogenic abscess (arrowhead). (G), (H) and (I) Enhanced MRI showing multiple oval-shaped contrast-enhanced lesions (arrow) with irregular thick peripheral enhancement which were hypointense in T1-weighted images and hyperintense in T2-weighted images and which occupied the right cerebellum.
Bottom Line: Aspergillus abscesses in the cerebellum are extremely rare, and most cases are solitary.The possible pathogenesis of this unusual event is discussed.Good outcome was achieved by treatment with a combination of neurosurgical resection and voriconazole (VRC) administration, which we suggest is a potential management plan.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.

ABSTRACT
Aspergillus abscesses in the cerebellum are extremely rare, and most cases are solitary. Here, we report the first case of multiple Aspergillus cerebellar abscesses in a 46-year-old female after one mastoidectomy, two craniectomies, and extended use of antibiotics. The possible pathogenesis of this unusual event is discussed. Good outcome was achieved by treatment with a combination of neurosurgical resection and voriconazole (VRC) administration, which we suggest is a potential management plan.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus