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Where were those rabbits? A new paradigm to determine cerebral lateralisation of visuospatial memory function in children.

Groen MA, Whitehouse AJ, Badcock NA, Bishop DV - Neuropsychologia (2011)

Bottom Line: In a group of 24 adults we found this child-friendly version gave similar results to the original version of the task.In addition, fourteen children aged 6-8 years successfully completed the child-friendly fTCD task, showing a negative lateralisation index, indicating right hemispheric specialisation at the group level.Additionally, we assessed effects of task accuracy and reaction time on the lateralisation index.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. m.groen@pwo.ru.nl

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Mean difference waveforms for adult data on the Circles (black) and the Rabbits (grey) paradigm. The time points where the stimulus appeared (Stimulus), part of the stimulus reappeared and the response cue (Response cue) was given, and the period of interest (POI) for calculation of the laterality index is also indicated.
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fig0005: Mean difference waveforms for adult data on the Circles (black) and the Rabbits (grey) paradigm. The time points where the stimulus appeared (Stimulus), part of the stimulus reappeared and the response cue (Response cue) was given, and the period of interest (POI) for calculation of the laterality index is also indicated.

Mentions: Mean difference curves (cerebral blood flow velocity change in the left minus the right channel) for the Circles and the Rabbits paradigm are plotted in Fig. 1. The curves looked similar, as was confirmed by the strong and statistically significant positive intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC)2, r = .91, p < .001. Table 1 summarizes the LIs and their latencies, as well as the t-value for testing difference from zero. For both paradigms the LI was negative and significantly different from zero, indicating lateralisation to the right hemisphere at the group level. Paired t-tests did not show significant differences between the Circles and the Rabbits paradigm with regard to the LIs (t(23) = 0.44, p = .663) or the latency at which the LIs occurred (t(23) = 1.52, p = .144).


Where were those rabbits? A new paradigm to determine cerebral lateralisation of visuospatial memory function in children.

Groen MA, Whitehouse AJ, Badcock NA, Bishop DV - Neuropsychologia (2011)

Mean difference waveforms for adult data on the Circles (black) and the Rabbits (grey) paradigm. The time points where the stimulus appeared (Stimulus), part of the stimulus reappeared and the response cue (Response cue) was given, and the period of interest (POI) for calculation of the laterality index is also indicated.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3198251&req=5

fig0005: Mean difference waveforms for adult data on the Circles (black) and the Rabbits (grey) paradigm. The time points where the stimulus appeared (Stimulus), part of the stimulus reappeared and the response cue (Response cue) was given, and the period of interest (POI) for calculation of the laterality index is also indicated.
Mentions: Mean difference curves (cerebral blood flow velocity change in the left minus the right channel) for the Circles and the Rabbits paradigm are plotted in Fig. 1. The curves looked similar, as was confirmed by the strong and statistically significant positive intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC)2, r = .91, p < .001. Table 1 summarizes the LIs and their latencies, as well as the t-value for testing difference from zero. For both paradigms the LI was negative and significantly different from zero, indicating lateralisation to the right hemisphere at the group level. Paired t-tests did not show significant differences between the Circles and the Rabbits paradigm with regard to the LIs (t(23) = 0.44, p = .663) or the latency at which the LIs occurred (t(23) = 1.52, p = .144).

Bottom Line: In a group of 24 adults we found this child-friendly version gave similar results to the original version of the task.In addition, fourteen children aged 6-8 years successfully completed the child-friendly fTCD task, showing a negative lateralisation index, indicating right hemispheric specialisation at the group level.Additionally, we assessed effects of task accuracy and reaction time on the lateralisation index.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. m.groen@pwo.ru.nl

Show MeSH