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Single scrotal incision orchiopexy for children with palpable low-lying undescended testis: early outcome of a prospective randomized controlled study.

Na SW, Kim SO, Hwang EC, Oh KJ, Jeong SI, Kang TW, Kwon DD, Park K, Ryu SB - Korean J Urol (2011)

Bottom Line: Surgical outcomes and complications were compared between the two groups.Postoperative complications were found in two cases (hematoma, wound dehiscence) in group I and in one case (wound dehiscence) in group II; all cases with complications recovered with conservative care.The subjective rate of satisfaction with the cosmetic result was 96.6% in group I and 96.5% in group II (p=0.97).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: We prospectively evaluated the surgical outcomes of single scrotal incision orchiopexy in children with a palpable undescended testis compared with the traditional two incision orchiopexy.

Materials and methods: A total of 398 orchiopexies (292 children) were included and randomly assigned to the single scrotal incision orchiopexy group (Group I, 147 children, 201 testes) or the traditional inguinal incision orchiopexy group (Group II, 145 children, 197 testes). The final number of patients enrolled (excluding those lost to follow-up) was 107 children (146 testes) in group I and 105 children (141 testes) in group II. Success was defined as no complications, postoperative intrascrotal location of the testis, and no conversion to the traditional inguinal approach. Surgical outcomes and complications were compared between the two groups. Testicular location, complications, and subjective satisfaction rate were assessed at the follow-up evaluation at least 12 months postoperatively.

Results: The overall success rate in group I was 92.5% in 135 of 146 testes; the remaining 9 testes required conversion to traditional two incision orchiopexy. In group II, orchiopexy was successful in 136 of 141 testes (96.5%). The operation time and hospital stay were significantly shorter in group I (40.5±25.9 minutes, 2.1±0.8 days) than in group II (62.3±35.6 minutes, 2.5±0.7 days), respectively (p<0.001, p=0.03). Postoperative complications were found in two cases (hematoma, wound dehiscence) in group I and in one case (wound dehiscence) in group II; all cases with complications recovered with conservative care. The subjective rate of satisfaction with the cosmetic result was 96.6% in group I and 96.5% in group II (p=0.97).

Conclusions: We conclude that single scrotal incision orchiopexy is a simple technique that is associated with a shorter operation time and hospital stay than the traditional method and that is more feasible cosmetically.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Disposition of subjects assigned to the study.
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Figure 1: Disposition of subjects assigned to the study.

Mentions: From January 2007 to December 2010, a total of 292 children (398 testes) with palpable undescended testes were randomly assigned to two groups: single scrotal incision orchiopexy (Group I, 147 children with 201 testes) or traditional inguinal incision orchiopexy (Group II, 145 children with 197 testes). Patients were assigned to the scrotal or inguinal group in a 1:1 ratio through a simple randomization procedure. A total of 80 patients were lost to follow-up (Fig. 1). A total of 107 children (146 testes) underwent single scrotal incision orchiopexy (group I) and 105 children (141 testes) underwent traditional inguinal incision orchiopexy (group II). They were followed up and evaluated until 12 months after the operation and included in the final data analysis. The patients' mean ages (months) at the time of operation in groups I and II were 40.1±10.3 and 41.8±11.4, respectively (Table 1). All patients were seen at least 1 week postoperatively to evaluate the possible occurrence of wound infection or skin problems and to assess for any other operation-related complications. At 3 months and 12 months after the operation, the patients were followed up for evaluation of long-term complications, overall success rate, and parents' satisfaction rate. Success was defined as no complications, postoperative intrascrotal location of the testis, and no conversion to the other method. The parents' satisfaction with the cosmetic results of the operation was assessed by use of a simple questionnaire that consisted of the answers 'satisfied,' 'not fully satisfied,' and 'unsatisfied.' This study was approved by the institutional review board of our hospital. All parents signed an informed consent form before participation in this study allowing the use of the patients' medical records for a scientific purpose.


Single scrotal incision orchiopexy for children with palpable low-lying undescended testis: early outcome of a prospective randomized controlled study.

Na SW, Kim SO, Hwang EC, Oh KJ, Jeong SI, Kang TW, Kwon DD, Park K, Ryu SB - Korean J Urol (2011)

Disposition of subjects assigned to the study.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3198239&req=5

Figure 1: Disposition of subjects assigned to the study.
Mentions: From January 2007 to December 2010, a total of 292 children (398 testes) with palpable undescended testes were randomly assigned to two groups: single scrotal incision orchiopexy (Group I, 147 children with 201 testes) or traditional inguinal incision orchiopexy (Group II, 145 children with 197 testes). Patients were assigned to the scrotal or inguinal group in a 1:1 ratio through a simple randomization procedure. A total of 80 patients were lost to follow-up (Fig. 1). A total of 107 children (146 testes) underwent single scrotal incision orchiopexy (group I) and 105 children (141 testes) underwent traditional inguinal incision orchiopexy (group II). They were followed up and evaluated until 12 months after the operation and included in the final data analysis. The patients' mean ages (months) at the time of operation in groups I and II were 40.1±10.3 and 41.8±11.4, respectively (Table 1). All patients were seen at least 1 week postoperatively to evaluate the possible occurrence of wound infection or skin problems and to assess for any other operation-related complications. At 3 months and 12 months after the operation, the patients were followed up for evaluation of long-term complications, overall success rate, and parents' satisfaction rate. Success was defined as no complications, postoperative intrascrotal location of the testis, and no conversion to the other method. The parents' satisfaction with the cosmetic results of the operation was assessed by use of a simple questionnaire that consisted of the answers 'satisfied,' 'not fully satisfied,' and 'unsatisfied.' This study was approved by the institutional review board of our hospital. All parents signed an informed consent form before participation in this study allowing the use of the patients' medical records for a scientific purpose.

Bottom Line: Surgical outcomes and complications were compared between the two groups.Postoperative complications were found in two cases (hematoma, wound dehiscence) in group I and in one case (wound dehiscence) in group II; all cases with complications recovered with conservative care.The subjective rate of satisfaction with the cosmetic result was 96.6% in group I and 96.5% in group II (p=0.97).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: We prospectively evaluated the surgical outcomes of single scrotal incision orchiopexy in children with a palpable undescended testis compared with the traditional two incision orchiopexy.

Materials and methods: A total of 398 orchiopexies (292 children) were included and randomly assigned to the single scrotal incision orchiopexy group (Group I, 147 children, 201 testes) or the traditional inguinal incision orchiopexy group (Group II, 145 children, 197 testes). The final number of patients enrolled (excluding those lost to follow-up) was 107 children (146 testes) in group I and 105 children (141 testes) in group II. Success was defined as no complications, postoperative intrascrotal location of the testis, and no conversion to the traditional inguinal approach. Surgical outcomes and complications were compared between the two groups. Testicular location, complications, and subjective satisfaction rate were assessed at the follow-up evaluation at least 12 months postoperatively.

Results: The overall success rate in group I was 92.5% in 135 of 146 testes; the remaining 9 testes required conversion to traditional two incision orchiopexy. In group II, orchiopexy was successful in 136 of 141 testes (96.5%). The operation time and hospital stay were significantly shorter in group I (40.5±25.9 minutes, 2.1±0.8 days) than in group II (62.3±35.6 minutes, 2.5±0.7 days), respectively (p<0.001, p=0.03). Postoperative complications were found in two cases (hematoma, wound dehiscence) in group I and in one case (wound dehiscence) in group II; all cases with complications recovered with conservative care. The subjective rate of satisfaction with the cosmetic result was 96.6% in group I and 96.5% in group II (p=0.97).

Conclusions: We conclude that single scrotal incision orchiopexy is a simple technique that is associated with a shorter operation time and hospital stay than the traditional method and that is more feasible cosmetically.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus