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The effects of magnesium on the course of atrial fibrillation and coagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing mitral valve annuloplasty.

Kang WS, Yun HJ, Han SJ, Kim HY, Kim DK, Lim JA, Woo NS, Kim SH - Korean J Anesthesiol (2011)

Bottom Line: After magnesium infusion, the serum level of magnesium increased significantly but serum calcium did not change significantly.ACT did not change significantly before or after magnesium infusion.The thromboelastographic parameters showed no significant changes before or after magnesium infusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anaesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. Magnesium has been reported to be effective in reducing the incidence or prophylaxis of AF. Magnesium is also an essential constituent of many enzyme systems and plays a physiological role in coagulation regulation. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of magnesium, whether magnesium infusion might decrease the incidence of AF and induce hypocoagulable state in patients with AF, who were undergoing mitral valve annuloplasty.

Methods: This prospective laboratory study was performed using blood from patients with AF undergoing mitral valve annuloplasty. The radial artery was punctured with a 20 gauge catheter and used for monitoring continuous arterial pressure and blood sampling. After anesthesia induction, 4 g of magnesium was mixed with 100 ml normal saline and infused for 5 minutes. Magnesium, calcium, activated clotting time (ACT) and thromboelastographic parameters were checked before and 60 minutes after the magnesium infusion. The electrocardiography changes after magnesium infusion were also checked before commencing cardiopulmonary bypass.

Results: After magnesium infusion, the serum level of magnesium increased significantly but serum calcium did not change significantly. ACT did not change significantly before or after magnesium infusion. The thromboelastographic parameters showed no significant changes before or after magnesium infusion. None of the patients converted to sinus rhythm from AF after the magnesium infusion.

Conclusions: A magnesium infusion did not influence the course of AF and coagulation in patients during prebypass period with AF undergoing mitral valve annuloplasty.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Rotational thromboelastometry parameters. clotting time (CT), clot formation time (CFT), α angle, maximum clot firmness (MCF) and maximum lysis (ML).
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Figure 1: Rotational thromboelastometry parameters. clotting time (CT), clot formation time (CFT), α angle, maximum clot firmness (MCF) and maximum lysis (ML).

Mentions: CT was the time until the initiation of clotting. CFT was the time from the initiation of clotting until the clot reached 20 mm, which represented the speed of clot formation. The α angle was the tangent of the curve made as 20 mm of firmness was reached and describes the kinetics of clot formation. MCF described the maximum amplitude of thromboelastogram and reflected clot strength. ML was the reduction in clot firmness in relation to MCF and represented maximum fibrinolysis detected during analysis (Fig. 1).


The effects of magnesium on the course of atrial fibrillation and coagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing mitral valve annuloplasty.

Kang WS, Yun HJ, Han SJ, Kim HY, Kim DK, Lim JA, Woo NS, Kim SH - Korean J Anesthesiol (2011)

Rotational thromboelastometry parameters. clotting time (CT), clot formation time (CFT), α angle, maximum clot firmness (MCF) and maximum lysis (ML).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3198181&req=5

Figure 1: Rotational thromboelastometry parameters. clotting time (CT), clot formation time (CFT), α angle, maximum clot firmness (MCF) and maximum lysis (ML).
Mentions: CT was the time until the initiation of clotting. CFT was the time from the initiation of clotting until the clot reached 20 mm, which represented the speed of clot formation. The α angle was the tangent of the curve made as 20 mm of firmness was reached and describes the kinetics of clot formation. MCF described the maximum amplitude of thromboelastogram and reflected clot strength. ML was the reduction in clot firmness in relation to MCF and represented maximum fibrinolysis detected during analysis (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: After magnesium infusion, the serum level of magnesium increased significantly but serum calcium did not change significantly.ACT did not change significantly before or after magnesium infusion.The thromboelastographic parameters showed no significant changes before or after magnesium infusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anaesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. Magnesium has been reported to be effective in reducing the incidence or prophylaxis of AF. Magnesium is also an essential constituent of many enzyme systems and plays a physiological role in coagulation regulation. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of magnesium, whether magnesium infusion might decrease the incidence of AF and induce hypocoagulable state in patients with AF, who were undergoing mitral valve annuloplasty.

Methods: This prospective laboratory study was performed using blood from patients with AF undergoing mitral valve annuloplasty. The radial artery was punctured with a 20 gauge catheter and used for monitoring continuous arterial pressure and blood sampling. After anesthesia induction, 4 g of magnesium was mixed with 100 ml normal saline and infused for 5 minutes. Magnesium, calcium, activated clotting time (ACT) and thromboelastographic parameters were checked before and 60 minutes after the magnesium infusion. The electrocardiography changes after magnesium infusion were also checked before commencing cardiopulmonary bypass.

Results: After magnesium infusion, the serum level of magnesium increased significantly but serum calcium did not change significantly. ACT did not change significantly before or after magnesium infusion. The thromboelastographic parameters showed no significant changes before or after magnesium infusion. None of the patients converted to sinus rhythm from AF after the magnesium infusion.

Conclusions: A magnesium infusion did not influence the course of AF and coagulation in patients during prebypass period with AF undergoing mitral valve annuloplasty.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus